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1.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7): 2135, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860452
2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325537

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the enveloped RNA virus SARS-CoV-2 primarily affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. SARS-CoV-2 was isolated from faecal samples and active viral replication was reported in human intestinal cells. The human gut also harbors an enormous amount of resident viruses (collectively known as the virome) that play a role in regulating host immunity and disease pathophysiology. Understanding gut virome perturbation that underlies SARS-CoV-2 infection and severity is an unmet need. Methods: : We enrolled 98 COVID-19 patients with varying disease severity (3 asymptomatic, 53 mild, 34 moderate, 5 severe, 3 critical) and 78 non-COVID-19 controls matched for gender and co-morbidities. All subjects had faecal specimens sampled at inclusion. Blood specimens were collected for COVID-19 patients at admission to test for inflammatory markers and white cell counts. Among COVID-19 cases, 37 (38%) patients had serial faecal samples collected 2 to 3 times per week from time of hospitalization until after discharge. Using shotgun metagenomics sequencing, we sequenced and profiled the faecal RNA and DNA virome. We investigated alterations and longitudinal dynamics of the gut virome in association with disease severity and blood parameters. Results: : Patients with COVID-19 showed underrepresentation of Pepper mild mottle virus (RNA virus) and multiple bacteriophage lineages (DNA viruses) and enrichment of environment-derived eukaryotic DNA viruses in faecal samples, compared to non-COVID-19 subjects. Such gut virome alterations persisted up to 30 days after disease resolution. Faecal virome in SARS-CoV-2 infection harboured more stress-, inflammation- and virulence-associated gene encoding capacities including those pertaining to bacteriophage integration, DNA repair, and metabolism and virulence associated with their bacterial host. Baseline fecal abundance of 10 virus species (1 RNA virus, Pepper chlorotic spot virus, and 9 DNA virus species) inversely correlated with disease COVID-19 severity. These viruses inversely correlated with blood levels of pro-inflammatory proteins, white cells and neutrophils. Among the 10 COVID-19 severity-associated DNA virus species, 4 showed inverse correlation with age;5 showed persistent lower abundance both during disease course and after disease resolution relative to non-COVID-19 subjects. Conclusions: Both enteric RNA and DNA virome in COVID-19 patients were different from non-COVID-19 subjects, which persisted after disease resolution of COVID-19. Gut virome may calibrate host immunity and regulate severity to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our observation that gut viruses inversely correlated with both severity of COVID-19 and host age may partly explain that older subjects are prone to severe and worse COVID-19 outcomes. Altogether our data highlight the importance of human gut virome in severity and potentially therapeutics of COVID-19.

3.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 37(5): 823-831, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gut dysbiosis is associated with immune dysfunction and severity of COVID-19. Whether targeting dysbiosis will improve outcomes of COVID-19 is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effects of a novel gut microbiota-derived synbiotic formula (SIM01) as an adjuvant therapy on immunological responses and changes in gut microbiota of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This was an open-label, proof-of-concept study. Consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted to an infectious disease referral center in Hong Kong were given a novel formula of Bifidobacteria strains, galactooligosaccharides, xylooligosaccharide, and resistant dextrin (SIM01). The latter was derived from metagenomic databases of COVID-19 patients and healthy population. COVID-19 patients who were admitted under another independent infectious disease team during the same period without receiving SIM01 acted as controls. All patients received standard treatments for COVID-19 according to the hospital protocol. We assessed antibody response, plasma proinflammatory markers, nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 viral load, and fecal microbiota profile from admission up to week 5. RESULTS: Twenty-five consecutive COVID-19 patients received SIM01 for 28 days; 30 patients who did not receive the formula acted as controls. Significantly more patients receiving SIM01 than controls developed SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody (88% vs 63.3%; P = 0.037) by Day 16. One (4%) and 8 patients (26.7%) in the SIM01 and control group, respectively, failed to develop positive IgG antibody upon discharge. At week 5, plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and IL-1RA reduced significantly in the SIM01 but not in the control group. There was a significant negative correlation of nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 viral load and SIM01 intervention. Metagenomic analysis showed that bacterial species in SIM01 formula were found in greater abundance leading to enrichment of commensal bacteria and suppression of opportunistic pathogens in COVID-19 patients by week 4 and week 5. CONCLUSIONS: This proof-of-concept study suggested that the use of a novel gut microbiota-derived synbiotic formula, SIM01, hastened antibody formation against SARS-CoV-2, reduced nasopharyngeal viral load, reduced pro-inflammatory immune markers, and restored gut dysbiosis in hospitalised COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Synbiotics , Bacteria , COVID-19/therapy , Dysbiosis , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Digestion ; 103(1): 7-21, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511552

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 outbreak abruptly restricted gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy services during the first wave of the pandemic. We aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the practice of GI endoscopy in Asian countries. METHODS: This was an International Questionnaire-based Internet Survey conducted at multiple facilities by the International Gastrointestinal Consensus Symposium. A total of 166 respondents in Japan, China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, and Singapore participated in this study. RESULTS: The volume of endoscopic screening or follow-up endoscopies and therapeutic endoscopies were markedly reduced during the first wave of the pandemic, which was mainly attributed to the decreased number of outpatients, cancellations by patients, and adherence to the guidelines of academic societies. The most common indications for GI endoscopy during the first wave were GI bleeding, cholangitis or obstructive jaundice, and a highly suspicious case of neoplasia. The most common GI symptoms of COVID-19 patients during the infected period included diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. The pandemic exacerbated some GI diseases, such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. There were cases with delayed diagnosis of cancers due to postponed endoscopic procedures, and the prescription of proton pump inhibitors/potassium-competitive acid blockers, steroids, immunosuppressive agents, and biologics was delayed or canceled. The personal protective equipment used during endoscopic procedures for high-risk patients were disposable gloves, disposable gowns, N95 or equivalent masks, and face shields. However, the devices on the patient side during endoscopic procedures included modified surgical masks, mouthpieces with filters, and disposable vinyl boxes or aerosol boxes covering the head. Furthermore, the time for education, basic research, clinical research, and daily clinical practice decreased during the first wave. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that the COVID-19 pandemic profoundly affected the method of performing GI endoscopy and medical treatment for patients with GI diseases in Asian countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Gastroenterology ; 162(2): 548-561.e4, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475507

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with altered gut microbiota composition. Phylogenetic groups of gut bacteria involved in the metabolism of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were depleted in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. We aimed to characterize a functional profile of the gut microbiome in patients with COVID-19 before and after disease resolution. METHODS: We performed shotgun metagenomic sequencing on fecal samples from 66 antibiotics-naïve patients with COVID-19 and 70 non-COVID-19 controls. Serial fecal samples were collected (at up to 6 times points) during hospitalization and beyond 1 month after discharge. We assessed gut microbial pathways in association with disease severity and blood inflammatory markers. We also determined changes of microbial functions in fecal samples before and after disease resolution and validated these functions using targeted analysis of fecal metabolites. RESULTS: Compared with non-COVID-19 controls, patients with COVID-19 with severe/critical illness showed significant alterations in gut microbiome functionality (P < .001), characterized by impaired capacity of gut microbiome for SCFA and L-isoleucine biosynthesis and enhanced capacity for urea production. Impaired SCFA and L-isoleucine biosynthesis in gut microbiome persisted beyond 30 days after recovery in patients with COVID-19. Targeted analysis of fecal metabolites showed significantly lower fecal concentrations of SCFAs and L-isoleucine in patients with COVID-19 before and after disease resolution. Lack of SCFA and L-isoleucine biosynthesis significantly correlated with disease severity and increased plasma concentrations of CXCL-10, NT- proB-type natriuretic peptide, and C-reactive protein (all P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Gut microbiome of patients with COVID-19 displayed impaired capacity for SCFA and L-isoleucine biosynthesis that persisted even after disease resolution. These 2 microbial functions correlated with host immune response underscoring the importance of gut microbial functions in SARS-CoV-2 infection pathogenesis and outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Fatty Acids, Volatile/biosynthesis , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Immunity/physiology , Isoleucine/biosynthesis , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , Case-Control Studies , Feces/microbiology , Female , Humans , Male , Metagenomics , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Gastroenterology ; 160(6): 2195-2196, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287837
7.
ACS Cent Sci ; 7(5): 792-802, 2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225483

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a global threat to human health. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we identified and validated the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor simeprevir as an especially promising repurposable drug for treating COVID-19. Simeprevir potently reduces SARS-CoV-2 viral load by multiple orders of magnitude and synergizes with remdesivir in vitro. Mechanistically, we showed that simeprevir not only inhibits the main protease (Mpro) and unexpectedly the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) but also modulates host immune responses. Our results thus reveal the possible anti-SARS-CoV-2 mechanism of simeprevir and highlight the translational potential of optimizing simeprevir as a therapeutic agent for managing COVID-19 and future outbreaks of CoV.

8.
Microbiome ; 9(1): 91, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183579

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the enveloped RNA virus SARS-CoV-2 primarily affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. SARS-CoV-2 was isolated from fecal samples, and active viral replication was reported in human intestinal cells. The human gut also harbors an enormous amount of resident viruses (collectively known as the virome) that play a role in regulating host immunity and disease pathophysiology. Understanding gut virome perturbation that underlies SARS-CoV-2 infection and severity is an unmet need. METHODS: We enrolled 98 COVID-19 patients with varying disease severity (3 asymptomatic, 53 mild, 34 moderate, 5 severe, 3 critical) and 78 non-COVID-19 controls matched for gender and co-morbidities. All subjects had fecal specimens sampled at inclusion. Blood specimens were collected for COVID-19 patients at admission to test for inflammatory markers and white cell counts. Among COVID-19 cases, 37 (38%) patients had serial fecal samples collected 2 to 3 times per week from time of hospitalization until after discharge. Using shotgun metagenomics sequencing, we sequenced and profiled the fecal RNA and DNA virome. We investigated alterations and longitudinal dynamics of the gut virome in association with disease severity and blood parameters. RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 showed underrepresentation of Pepper mild mottle virus (RNA virus) and multiple bacteriophage lineages (DNA viruses) and enrichment of environment-derived eukaryotic DNA viruses in fecal samples, compared to non-COVID-19 subjects. Such gut virome alterations persisted up to 30 days after disease resolution. Fecal virome in SARS-CoV-2 infection harbored more stress-, inflammation-, and virulence-associated gene encoding capacities including those pertaining to bacteriophage integration, DNA repair, and metabolism and virulence associated with their bacterial host. Baseline fecal abundance of 10 virus species (1 RNA virus, pepper chlorotic spot virus, and 9 DNA virus species) inversely correlated with disease COVID-19 severity. These viruses inversely correlated with blood levels of pro-inflammatory proteins, white cells, and neutrophils. Among the 10 COVID-19 severity-associated DNA virus species, 4 showed inverse correlation with age; 5 showed persistent lower abundance both during disease course and after disease resolution relative to non-COVID-19 subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Both enteric RNA and DNA virome in COVID-19 patients were different from non-COVID-19 subjects, which persisted after disease resolution of COVID-19. Gut virome may calibrate host immunity and regulate severity to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our observation that gut viruses inversely correlated with both severity of COVID-19 and host age may partly explain that older subjects are prone to severe and worse COVID-19 outcomes. Altogether, our data highlight the importance of human gut virome in severity and potentially therapeutics of COVID-19. Video Abstract.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Child, Preschool , DNA , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Humans , RNA , SARS-CoV-2 , Virome
9.
Trends Food Sci Technol ; 108: 187-196, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974673

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 exhibit diverse clinical manifestations and severity including enteric involvement. Commensal gut bacteria can contribute to defense against potential pathogens by promoting beneficial immune interactions. Interventions targeting the gut microbiome may have systemic anti-viral effects in SARS-CoV-2 infection. SCOPE AND APPROACH: To summarise alterations of gut microbiota in patients with COVID-19 including impact of specific bacteria on disease severity, discuss current knowledge on the role of probiotics, prebiotics and dietary approaches including vitamin D in preventing and reducing disease susceptibility and review clinical studies using probiotics to target coronavirus. A literature review on SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, gut microbiome and immunity was undertaken and relevant literature was summarised and critically examined. KEY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Integrity of gut microbiome was perturbed in SARS-CoV-2 infections and associated with disease severity. Poor prognosis in SARS-CoV-2 infection was observed in subjects with underlying co-morbidities who had increased gut permeability and reduced gut microbiome diversity. Dietary microbes, including probiotics or selected prebiotics of Chinese origin, had anti-viral effects against other forms of coronavirus, and could positively impact host immune functions during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Numerous studies are investigating the role of probiotics in preventing and reducing susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection in healthcare workers, household contacts and affected patients. An approach to strengthen intestinal barrier and lower pro-inflammatory states by adopting a more diversified diet during COVID-19 pandemic.SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with immune dysfunction and gut microbiota alterations. Delineating mechanisms of probiotics, prebiotics and diet with anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity present opportunities for discovery of microbial therapeutics to prevent and treat COVID-19.

10.
CMAJ ; 192(43): E1336-E1340, 2020 10 26.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962949
12.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-992

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies showed that SARS-CoV-2 RNA may be found in faecal specimens of patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but the s

13.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(8): 722-723, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641173
14.
J Infect ; 81(2): e31-e38, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593366

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Recent studies showed that SARS-CoV-2 RNA may be found in fecal specimens of COVID-19 patients, but the sample size is limited. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in fecal specimens of these patients according to their clinical characteristics. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, and three Chinese biomedical databases were searched up to 25 March 2020 with no language restriction. We included original observational studies that reported the detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in fecal specimens of COVID-19 patients. Two separate reviewers conducted the review. Metaprop was adopted to conduct a meta-analysis of prevalence with variances stabilized by Freeman-Tukey Double Arcsine Transformation. A random-effects model was used. Heterogeneity across different studies was computed using Cochran's Q test and chi square statistics. RESULTS: From 17 studies, the pooled detection rate of fecal SARS-CoV-2 RNA was 43.7% (95% CI 32.6%-55.0%) and 33.7% (95% C.I. 33.7%, 95% C.I. 20.1%-48.8%) by patient and number of specimens as a unit count, respectively. Female individuals (59.6% vs. 53.5%), those who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms (77.1% vs. 57.7%), and patients with more severe disease (68.3% vs. 34.6%) tended to have a higher detection rate. DISCUSSION: A significant proportion of COVID-19 patients carry SARS-CoV-2 in their intestinal tract. Feces being a self-collected specimen bears a potential to improve case identification in community, especially for young children where proper respiratory sampling at home is difficult. Specific infection control strategies focusing on spread via fecal contamination and faulty toilet drainage are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Feces/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Specimen Handling
15.
Gastroenterology ; 159(4): 1302-1310.e5, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects intestinal cells, and might affect the intestinal microbiota. We investigated changes in the fecal fungal microbiomes (mycobiome) of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection during hospitalization and on recovery. METHODS: We performed deep shotgun metagenomic sequencing analysis of fecal samples from 30 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hong Kong, from February 5 through May 12, 2020. Fecal samples were collected 2 to 3 times per week from time of hospitalization until discharge. We compared fecal mycobiome compositions of patients with COVID-19 with those from 9 subjects with community-acquired pneumonia and 30 healthy individuals (controls). We assessed fecal mycobiome profiles throughout time of hospitalization until clearance of SARS-CoV-2 from nasopharyngeal samples. RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 had significant alterations in their fecal mycobiomes compared with controls, characterized by enrichment of Candia albicans and a highly heterogeneous mycobiome configuration, at time of hospitalization. Although fecal mycobiomes of 22 patients with COVID-19 did not differ significantly from those of controls during times of hospitalization, 8 of 30 patients with COVID-19 had continued significant differences in fecal mycobiome composition, through the last sample collected. The diversity of the fecal mycobiome of the last sample collected from patients with COVID-19 was 2.5-fold higher than that of controls (P < .05). Samples collected at all timepoints from patients with COVID-19 had increased proportions of opportunistic fungal pathogens, Candida albicans, Candida auris, and Aspergillus flavus compared with controls. Two respiratory-associated fungal pathogens, A. flavus and Aspergillus niger, were detected in fecal samples from a subset of patients with COVID-19, even after clearance of SARS-CoV-2 from nasopharyngeal samples and resolution of respiratory symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In a pilot study, we found heterogeneous configurations of the fecal mycobiome, with enrichment of fungal pathogens from the genera Candida and Aspergillus, during hospitalization of 30 patients with COVID-19 compared with controls. Unstable gut mycobiomes and prolonged dysbiosis persisted in a subset of patients with COVID-19 up to 12 days after nasopharyngeal clearance of SARS-CoV-2. Studies are needed to determine whether alterations in intestinal fungi contribute to or result from SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the effects of these changes in disease progression.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/microbiology , Feces/microbiology , Fungi/isolation & purification , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Mycobiome , Pneumonia, Viral/microbiology , Adult , Aged , Aspergillus flavus/genetics , Aspergillus flavus/isolation & purification , Aspergillus niger/genetics , Aspergillus niger/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Candida/genetics , Candida/isolation & purification , Candida albicans/genetics , Candida albicans/isolation & purification , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , DNA, Fungal/analysis , Female , Fungi/genetics , Humans , Male , Metagenomics , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Pneumonia/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Young Adult
16.
Gastroenterology ; 159(3): 944-955.e8, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324569

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects gastrointestinal tissues, little is known about the roles of gut commensal microbes in susceptibility to and severity of infection. We investigated changes in fecal microbiomes of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection during hospitalization and associations with severity and fecal shedding of virus. METHODS: We performed shotgun metagenomic sequencing analyses of fecal samples from 15 patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hong Kong, from February 5 through March 17, 2020. Fecal samples were collected 2 or 3 times per week from time of hospitalization until discharge; disease was categorized as mild (no radiographic evidence of pneumonia), moderate (pneumonia was present), severe (respiratory rate ≥30/min, or oxygen saturation ≤93% when breathing ambient air), or critical (respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, shock, or organ failure requiring intensive care). We compared microbiome data with those from 6 subjects with community-acquired pneumonia and 15 healthy individuals (controls). We assessed gut microbiome profiles in association with disease severity and changes in fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 had significant alterations in fecal microbiomes compared with controls, characterized by enrichment of opportunistic pathogens and depletion of beneficial commensals, at time of hospitalization and at all timepoints during hospitalization. Depleted symbionts and gut dysbiosis persisted even after clearance of SARS-CoV-2 (determined from throat swabs) and resolution of respiratory symptoms. The baseline abundance of Coprobacillus, Clostridium ramosum, and Clostridium hathewayi correlated with COVID-19 severity; there was an inverse correlation between abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (an anti-inflammatory bacterium) and disease severity. Over the course of hospitalization, Bacteroides dorei, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides massiliensis, and Bacteroides ovatus, which downregulate expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in murine gut, correlated inversely with SARS-CoV-2 load in fecal samples from patients. CONCLUSIONS: In a pilot study of 15 patients with COVID-19, we found persistent alterations in the fecal microbiome during the time of hospitalization, compared with controls. Fecal microbiota alterations were associated with fecal levels of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 severity. Strategies to alter the intestinal microbiota might reduce disease severity.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/microbiology , Dysbiosis/virology , Feces/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/microbiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract/microbiology , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Gut ; 69(6): 991-996, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-30892

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 has become a global pandemic. Risk of transmission may occur during endoscopy and the goal is to prevent infection among healthcare professionals while providing essential services to patients. Asia was the first continent to have a COVID-19 outbreak, and this position statement of the Asian Pacific Society for Digestive Endoscopy shares our successful experience in maintaining safe and high-quality endoscopy practice at a time when resources are limited. Sixteen experts from key societies of digestive endoscopy in Asia were invited to develop position statements, including patient triage and risk assessment before endoscopy, resource prioritisation and allocation, regular monitoring of personal protective equipment, infection control measures, protective device training and implementation of a strategy for stepwise resumption of endoscopy services after control of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/adverse effects , Equipment Contamination , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
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