Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
Journal of Industrial Relations ; : 00221856221114449, 2022.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1956972

ABSTRACT

A short health workers? strike held in early 2020 in Hong Kong at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic demonstrates the importance of democratic framing of social movement unionism. A trade union was established during a period of massive civil unrest against the local government in 2019 and then proceeded to organise a strike within 2 months of formation to pressure both their employer and the government to enhance citizen and health workers? safety as the pandemic entered Hong Kong. The paper explains the organisation, progress and reaction to the strike by different stakeholders. The case exemplifies mobilisation through strong democratic trade unionism and provides an example of social movement framing that combined membership and societal interests. The strike represents the last instance of successful independent union mobilisation in Hong Kong as governance shifted from laisse-faire industrial relations that favoured the local capitalist elite to state authoritarianism focussed on obedience to the national political elite.

2.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 35(4): 213-217, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861898

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is now endemic and has taken a terrible toll on the health workforce and its leaders. Stress and burnout are rampant, and health workers are leaving in record numbers. Using data collected during the first four waves of the pandemic, and a longitudinal analysis of these data, the authors identify ongoing challenges to health leadership related to building resilience and psychologically healthy workplaces. The article is organized around three questions: What happened during Waves 1 to 4? What did we learn? And what should be done differently? Eight actions emerged around the theme of "leaders supporting leaders": build personal resilience; practice compassionate leadership; model effective interpersonal leadership behaviour; ensure frequent and authentic communication; participate in networks and communities of practice; balance short- and long-term commitments; apply systems thinking; and contribute to a collaborative, national strategy.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , Workplace
3.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 55(1): 166-169, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700704

ABSTRACT

This was a preliminary study on ultraviolet C (UVC) irradiation for SARS-CoV-2-contaminated hospital environments. Forty-eight locations were tested for SARS-CoV-2 using RT-PCR (33.3% contamination rate). After series dosages of 222-nm UVC irradiation, samples from the surfaces were negative at 15 s irradiation at 2 cm length (fluence: 81 mJ/cm2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Disinfection , Humans , Ultraviolet Rays , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects
4.
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl) ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570195

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This first phase of a three-phase action research project aims to define leadership practices that should be used during and after the pandemic to re-imagine and rebuild the health and social care system. Specifically, the objectives were to determine what effective leadership practices Canadian health leaders have used through the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, to explore how these differ from pre-crisis practices; and to identify what leadership practices might be leveraged to create the desired health and care systems of the future. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The authors used an action research methodology. In the first phase, reported here, the authors conducted one-on-one, virtual interviews with 18 health leaders from across Canada and across leadership roles. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. FINDINGS: Five key practices emerged from the data, within the core dimension of disrupting entrenched structures and leadership practices. These were, namely, responding to more complex emotions in self and others. Future practice identified to create more psychologically supportive workplaces. Agile and adaptive leadership. Future practice should allow leaders to move systemic change forward more quickly. Integrating diverse perspectives, within and across organizations, leveling hierarchies through bringing together a variety of perspectives in the decision-making process and engaging people more broadly in the co-creation of strategies. Applying existing leadership capabilities and experience. Future practice should develop and expand mentorship to support early career leadership. Communication was increased to build credibility and trust in response to changing and often contradictory emerging evidence and messaging. Future practice should increase communication. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The project was limited to health leaders in Canada and did not represent all provinces/territories. Participants were recruited through the leadership networks, while diverse, were not demographically representative. All interviews were conducted in English; in the second phase of the study, the authors will recruit a larger and more diverse sample and conduct interviews in both English and French. As the interviews took place during the early stages of the pandemic, it may be that health leaders' views of what may be required to re-define future health systems may change as the crisis shifts over time. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The sponsoring organization of this research - the Canadian Health Leadership Network and each of its individual member partners - will mobilize knowledge from this research, and subsequent phases, to inform processes for leadership development and, succession planning across, the Canadian health system, particularly those attributes unique to a context of crisis management but also necessary in post-crisis recovery. SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS: This research has shown that there is an immediate need to develop innovative and influential leadership action - commensurate with its findings - to supporting the evolution of the Canadian health system, the emotional well-being of the health-care workforce, the mental health of the population and challenges inherent in structural inequities across health and health care that discriminate against certain populations. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: An interdisciplinary group of health researchers and decision-makers from across Canada who came together rapidly to examine leadership practices during COVID-19's first wave using action research study design.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Canada , Health Services Research , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542797

ABSTRACT

To overcome the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, transmission routes, such as healthcare worker infection, must be effectively prevented. Ultraviolet C (UVC) (254 nm) has recently been demonstrated to prevent environmental contamination by infected patients; however, studies on its application in contaminated hospital settings are limited. Herein, we explored the clinical application of UVC and determined its optimal dose. Environmental samples (n = 267) collected in 2021 were analyzed by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subjected to UVC irradiation for different durations (minutes). We found that washbasins had a high contamination rate (45.5%). SARS-CoV-2 was inactivated after 15 min (estimated dose: 126 mJ/cm2) of UVC irradiation, and the contamination decreased from 41.7% before irradiation to 16.7%, 8.3%, and 0% after 5, 10, and 15 min of irradiation, respectively (p = 0.005). However, SARS-CoV-2 was still detected in washbasins after irradiation for 20 min but not after 30 min (252 mJ/cm2). Thus, 15 min of 254-nm UVC irradiation was effective in cleaning plastic, steel, and wood surfaces in the isolation ward. For silicon items, such as washbasins, 30 min was suggested; however, further studies using hospital environmental samples are needed to confirm the effective UVC inactivation of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Ultraviolet Rays , COVID-19/virology , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time Factors
6.
Respirol Case Rep ; 9(12): e0877, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525484

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary mucormycosis (PM) is a rare, life-threatening fungal infection usually affecting immunocompromised patients. Its incidence is rising, with a recent outbreak associated with COVID-19 co-infection. Amphotericin B along with early surgery are considered the standard treatment. Recurrence has been reported in patients without adequate treatment and without permanent reversal of predisposing factors. We report a case of late recurrence of PM in a renal transplant recipient. In 2012, he was diagnosed with PM. Imaging at the time showed a lingular mass. He was treated with antifungal for 1 year until complete radiological resolution. Surgical intervention was considered but no further follow-up action was taken. In 2020, he presented with fever and haemoptysis. Imaging again showed a lingular mass, which was confirmed to be PM by bronchoscopic lung biopsy. This case highlights the importance of secondary antifungal prophylaxis for PM if permanent reversal of immunosuppression is not possible.

7.
J Intensive Care ; 9(1): 60, 2021 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456012

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Asia has more critically ill people than any other part of our planet. The aim of this article is to review the development of critical care as a specialty, critical care societies and education and research, the epidemiology of critical illness as well as epidemics and pandemics, accessibility and cost and quality of critical care, culture and end-of-life care, and future directions for critical care in Asia. MAIN BODY: Although the first Asian intensive care units (ICUs) surfaced in the 1960s and the 1970s and specialisation started in the 1990s, multiple challenges still exist, including the lack of intensivists, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists in many countries. This is aggravated by the brain drain of skilled ICU staff to high-income countries. Critical care societies have been integral to the development of the discipline and have increasingly contributed to critical care education, although critical care research is only just starting to take off through collaboration across groups. Sepsis, increasingly aggravated by multidrug resistance, contributes to a significant burden of critical illness, while epidemics and pandemics continue to haunt the continent intermittently. In particular, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has highlighted the central role of critical care in pandemic response. Accessibility to critical care is affected by lack of ICU beds and high costs, and quality of critical care is affected by limited capability for investigations and treatment in low- and middle-income countries. Meanwhile, there are clear cultural differences across countries, with considerable variations in end-of-life care. Demand for critical care will rise across the continent due to ageing populations and rising comorbidity burdens. Even as countries respond by increasing critical care capacity, the critical care community must continue to focus on training for ICU healthcare workers, processes anchored on evidence-based medicine, technology guided by feasibility and impact, research applicable to Asian and local settings, and rallying of governments for support for the specialty. CONCLUSIONS: Critical care in Asia has progressed through the years, but multiple challenges remain. These challenges should be addressed through a collaborative approach across disciplines, ICUs, hospitals, societies, governments, and countries.

8.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(6): 326-331, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403172

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has created a unique context for the practice of leadership in healthcare. Given the significant use of the LEADS in a Caring Environment capabilities framework (LEADS) in Canada's health system, it is important to document the relevancy of LEADS. The authors reviewed literature, conducted research, and reflected on their own experience to identify leadership practices during the pandemic and related them to LEADS. Findings are presented in three sections: Hindsight (before), Insight (during), and Foresight (post). We profile the issue of improving long-term Care to provide an example of how LEADS can be applied in crisis times. Our analysis suggests that while LEADS appears to specify the leadership capabilities needed, it requires adaptation to context. The vision Canada has for healthcare will dictate how LEADS will be used as a guide to leadership practice in the current context or to shape a bolder vision of healthcare's future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed ; 107(2): 174-180, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Synthesise evidence on production of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in human milk of individuals who had COVID-19, and antibodies' ability to neutralise SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. DESIGN: A systematic review of studies published from 1 December 2019 to 16 February 2021 without study design restrictions. SETTING: Data were sourced from PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, CNKI, CINAHL and WHO COVID-19 database. Search was also performed through reviewing references of selected articles, Google Scholar and preprint servers. Studies that tested human milk for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were included. PATIENTS: Individuals with COVID-19 infection and human milk tested for anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralising antibodies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of neutralising antibodies in milk samples provided by individuals with COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Individual participant data from 161 persons (14 studies) were extracted and re-pooled. Milk from 133 (82.6%) individuals demonstrated the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM and/or IgG. Illness severity data were available in 146 individuals; 5 (3.4%) had severe disease, 128 (87.7%) had mild disease, while 13 (8.9%) were asymptomatic. Presence of neutralising antibodies in milk from 20 (41.7%) of 48 individuals neutralised SARS-CoV-2 infectivity in vitro. Neutralising capacity of antibodies was lost after Holder pasteurisation but preserved after high-pressure pasteurisation. CONCLUSION: Human milk of lactating individuals after COVID-19 infection contains anti-SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG, IgM and/or IgA, even after mild or asymptomatic infection. Current evidence demonstrates that these antibodies can neutralise SARS-CoV-2 virus in vitro. Holder pasteurisation deactivates SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA, while high-pressure pasteurisation preserves the SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Milk, Human/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Humans , Immunoglobulins/analysis , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL