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2.
Cureus ; 14(3): e23361, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791866

ABSTRACT

Introduction The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disrupted traditional in-person learning models. Free Open Access Medical (FOAM) education resources naturally filled this void, so we evaluated how medical blog and podcast utilization changed during the early months of the pandemic. Methods Academic medical podcast and blog producers were surveyed on blog and podcast utilization immediately before (January-March 2020) and after (April-May 2020) the COVID-19 pandemic declaration and subsequent lockdown. Utilization is quantified in terms of blog post pageviews and podcast downloads. Linear regression was used to estimate the effect of publication during the COVID-19 period on 30-day downloads or pageviews. A linear mixed model was developed to confirm this relationship after adjustment for independent predictors of higher 30-day downloads or pageviews, using the podcast or blog as a random intercept. Results Compared to the pre-pandemic period, downloads and pageviews per unique blog and podcast publication significantly increased for blogs (median 30-day pageviews 802 to 1860, p<0.0001) but not for podcasts (median 30-day downloads 2726 to 1781, p=0.27). Publications that contained COVID-19 content were strongly associated with higher monthly utilization (ß=7.21, 95% CI 6.29-8.14 p<0.001), and even non-COVID-19 material had higher utilization in the early pandemic (median 30-day downloads/pageviews 868 to 1380, p<0.0001). Discussion The increased blog pageviews during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrated the important role of blogs in rapid knowledge translation. Podcasts did not experience a similar increase in utilization.

3.
CJEM ; 24(3): 288-292, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653877

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: A previous survey of Canadian emergency medicine (EM) physicians during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic documented less than 20% experienced high levels of burnout. This study examined the experience of a similar group of physicians during the second pandemic wave. We reported the associations between burnout and physician age, gender, having children at home and training route. METHODS: This study utilized a national survey of Canadian emergency physicians. We collected data on demographics and measured burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Multiple logistic regression models identified associations between the emotional exhaustion and depersonalization domains of the MBI and EM physician demographics (age, gender, children living at home, and training route). RESULTS: Between November 25, 2020, and February 4, 2021, 416 emergency physicians completed the survey, representing all Provinces or Territories in Canada (except Nunavut). The mean participant age was 44, 53% were male, 64% had children living at home and 41% were FRCPC and 41% CCFP-EM trained. Sixty percent reported high burnout (either high emotional exhaustion and/or high depersonalization). Increasing age was associated with lower emotional exhaustion and depersonalization; female or nonbinary gender was associated with an increase in emotional exhaustion; and having children living at home was associated with lower depersonalization. CONCLUSIONS: Most Canadian emergency physicians participating in our study during the COVID-19 pandemic reported high burnout levels. Younger physicians and female physicians were more likely than their coworkers to report high burnout levels. Hospitals should address emergency physician burnout during the pandemic because it is a threat to quality of patient care and retention of the workforce for the future.


RéSUMé: OBJECTIFS: Une enquête précédente sur les médecins d'urgence canadiens pendant la première vague de la pandémie de COVID-19 a montré que moins de 20 % d'entre eux souffraient de niveaux élevés d'épuisement professionnel. Cette étude a examiné l'expérience d'un groupe similaire de médecins au cours de la deuxième vague et a rapporté les associations entre l'épuisement professionnel et l'âge du médecin, son sexe, le fait d'avoir des enfants à la maison et le parcours de formation. MéTHODES: Cette étude s'est appuyée sur une enquête nationale auprès des médecins d'urgence canadiens. Nous avons recueilli des données démographiques et mesuré le burnout à l'aide du Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). De multiples modèles de régression logistique ont identifié des associations entre les domaines de l'épuisement émotionnel et de la dépersonnalisation du MBI et les données démographiques des médecins de la médecine d'urgence (âge, sexe, enfants vivant à la maison et parcours de formation). RéSULTATS: Entre le 25 novembre 2020 et le 4 février 2021, 416 médecins urgentistes ont répondu au sondage, représentant toutes les provinces ou territoires du Canada (sauf le Nunavut). L'âge moyen des participants était de 44 ans, 53% étaient des hommes, 64% avaient des enfants vivant à la maison et 41% étaient formés FRCPC et 41% CMFC-MU. Soixante pour cent ont signalé un épuisement professionnel élevé (soit un épuisement émotionnel élevé et/ou une dépersonnalisation élevée). L'augmentation de l'âge était associée à une diminution de l'épuisement émotionnel et de la dépersonnalisation ; le sexe féminin ou non binaire était associé à une augmentation de l'épuisement émotionnel ; et le fait d'avoir des enfants vivant à la maison était associé à une diminution de la dépersonnalisation. CONCLUSIONS: La plupart des médecins urgentistes canadiens ayant participé à notre étude pendant la pandémie de COVID-19 ont signalé des niveaux élevés d'épuisement professionnel. Les médecins plus jeunes et les femmes médecins étaient plus susceptibles que leurs collègues de déclarer des niveaux élevés d'épuisement professionnel. Les hôpitaux doivent s'attaquer au problème de l'épuisement professionnel des médecins urgentistes pendant la pandémie, car il constitue une menace pour la qualité des soins aux patients et la rétention de la main-d'œuvre pour l'avenir.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Acad Med ; 97(5): 679-683, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354310

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Physical distancing restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic led to the transition from in-person to online teaching for many medical educators. This report describes the Virtual Resus Room (VRR)-a free, novel, open-access resource for running collaborative online simulations. APPROACH: The lead author created the VRR in May 2020 to give learners the opportunity to rehearse their crisis resource management skills by working as a team to complete virtual tasks. The VRR uses Google Slides to link participants to the virtual environment and Zoom to link participants to each other. Students and facilitators in the emergency medicine clerkship at McMaster University used the VRR to run 2 cases between June and August 2020. Students and facilitators completed a postsession survey to assess usability and acceptability, applicability for learning or teaching, and fidelity. In addition, students took a knowledge test pre- and postsession. OUTCOMES: Forty-six students and 11 facilitators completed the postsession surveys. Facilitators and students rated the VRR's usability and acceptability, applicability for learning and teaching, and fidelity highly. Students showed a significant improvement in their postsession (mean = 89.06, standard deviation [SD] = 9.56) compared with their presession knowledge scores (mean = 71.17, SD = 15.77; t(34) = 7.28, P < .001, with a large effect size Cohen's d = 1.23). Two perceived learning outcomes were identified: content learning and communication skills development. The total time spent (in minutes) facilitating VRR simulations (mean = 119, SD = 36) was significantly lower than time spent leading in-person simulations (mean = 181, SD = 58; U = 20.50, P < .008). NEXT STEPS: Next steps will include expanding the evaluation of the VRR to include participants from additional learner levels, from varying sites, and from other health professions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Emergency Medicine/education , Humans , Learning , Pandemics
6.
Neurol Sci ; 42(11): 4437-4445, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1353704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As medical education shifted to a virtual environment during the early coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we evaluated how neurology podcasting may have been utilized during this period, and which features of podcasts have been more highly sought by a medical audience. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of neurology-themed blogs and/or podcasts between April 2019 and May 2020. Programs were eligible if they reported mean monthly downloads > 2000, were affiliated with an academic society, or offered continuing medical education credit. Thirty-day download counts were compared between study months, with adjustment for multiple testing. Exploratory analyses were performed to determine which podcast features were associated with higher downloads. RESULTS: Of the 12 neurology podcasts surveyed, 8 completed the survey and 5 met inclusion criteria. The median monthly download count was 2865 (IQR 869-7497), with significant variability between programs (p < 0.001). While there was a 358% increase in downloads during April 2020 when compared to the previous month, this was not significant (median 8124 [IQR 2913-14,177] vs. 2268 [IQR 540-6116], padj = 0.80). The non-significant increase in overall downloads during April 2020 corresponded to an increase in unique episodes during that month (r = 0.48, p = 0.003). There was no difference in 30-day downloads among episodes including COVID-19 content versus not (median 1979 [IQR 791-2873] vs. 1171 [IQR 405-2665], p = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS: In this unique, exploratory study of academic neurology-themed podcasts, there was no significant increase in episode downloads during the early COVID-19 pandemic. A more comprehensive analysis of general and subspecialty medical podcasts is underway.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Humans , Retrospective Studies
7.
Acad Med ; 96(10): 1379-1382, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320332

ABSTRACT

The world's health care providers have realized that being agile in their thinking and growth in times of rapid change is paramount and that continuing education can be a key facet of the future of health care. As the world recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, educators at academic health centers are faced with a crucial question: How can continuing professional development (CPD) within teams and health systems be improved so that health care providers will be ready for the next disruption? How can new information about the next disruption be collected and disseminated so that interprofessional teams will be able to effectively and efficiently manage a new disease, new information, or new procedures and keep themselves safe? Unlike undergraduate and graduate/postgraduate education, CPD does not always have an identified educational home and has had uneven and limited innovation during the pandemic. In this commentary, the authors explore the barriers to change in this sector and propose 4 principles that may serve to guide a way forward: identifying a home for interprofessional continuing education at academic health centers, improving workplace-based learning, enhancing assessment for individuals within health care teams, and creating a culture of continuous learning that promotes population health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Acad Med ; 96(10): 1419-1424, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197039

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: The COVID-19 pandemic restricted in-person gatherings, including residency conferences. The pressure to quickly reorganize educational conferences and convert content to a remote format overwhelmed many programs. This article describes the pilot event of a large-scale, interactive, virtual educational conference modeled, designed, and implemented by Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), called ALiEM Connect. APPROACH: The pilot ALiEM Connect event was conceptualized and implemented within a 2-week period in March 2020. The pilot was livestreamed via a combination of Zoom and YouTube and was archived by YouTube. Slack was used as a backchannel to allow interaction with other participants and engagement with the speakers (via moderators who posed questions from the backchannel to the speakers live during the videoconference). OUTCOMES: The RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework was used for program evaluation, showing that 64 U.S. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited emergency medicine residency programs participated in the pilot event, with 1,178 unique users during the event (reach). For effectiveness, 93% (139/149) of trainees reported the pilot as enjoyable and 85% (126/149) reported it was equivalent to or better than their usual academic proceedings. Adoption for ALiEM Connect was fairly good with 64/237 (27%) of invited residency programs registering and participating in the pilot event. Implementation was demonstrated by nearly half of the livestream viewers (47%, 553/1,178) interacting in the backchannel discussion, sending a total of 4,128 messages in the first 4 hours. NEXT STEPS: The final component of the RE-AIM framework, maintenance, will take more time to evaluate. Further study is required to measure the educational impact of events like the ALiEM Connect pilot. The ALiEM Connect model could potentially be used to replace educational conferences that have been canceled or to implement and/or augment a large-scale, shared curriculum among residency programs in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Curriculum , Emergency Medicine/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Virtual Reality , Adult , Congresses as Topic , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , United States , Young Adult
13.
AEM Educ Train ; 4(4): 330-339, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-622809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the advent of the 2019 coronavirus pandemic, a decision was made to remove medical students from clinical rotations for their own safety. This forced students on a core emergency medicine (EM) rotation at McMaster University to immediately cease all in-person activities. An urgent need for a virtual curriculum emerged. METHODS: A virtual curriculum consisting of asynchronous case-based learning on Slack, ask-me-anything webinars, and online e-modules was created to fill the need. We describe a program evaluation using the RE-AIM framework and a social networking analysis of participants. RESULTS: Medical students (n = 23) and 11 facilitators (five residents, six faculty members) participated in this pilot study. Faculty members sent a mean (±SD) of 115 (±117) messages (n = 6), and mean (±SD) message counts for students and residents were 49.96 (±25; n = 23) and 39 (±38; n = 5), respectively. A total of 62,237 words were written by the participants, with a mean of 1,831 per person. Each message consisted of a mean (±SD) of 25 words (±29). Students rapidly acquitted themselves to digital technology. Using the RE-AIM framework we highlight the feasibility of a virtual curriculum, discuss demands on faculty time, and reflect on strategies to engage learners. CONCLUSIONS: The use of asynchronous digital curricula creates opportunities for faculty-resident interaction and engagement. We report the successful deployment of a viable model for undergraduate EM training for senior medical students in the COVID-19 era of physical distancing.

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