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1.
JAMA Network Open ; 5(12):e2245263, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2148222

ABSTRACT

Importance: Few studies have used precise age-specific data to construct age-standardized estimates of the relative risks (RRs) of COVID-19 mortality for people experiencing homelessness (PEH) vs the general population, and none to date has addressed race and ethnicity and sex variations in COVID-19 mortality among PEH with COVID-19 infection.

2.
Current Protein & Peptide Science ; 30:30, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141232

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus currently named SARS-CoV-2 was announced by the World Health Organization as the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic. The pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 initiates upon contact of a structural spike protein with the angiotensin II-converting enzyme receptor, leading to the induction of inflammatory mechanisms and progression to severe disease in some cases. Currently, studies have emerged linking COVID-19 with angiotensin-(1-7), demonstrating the potential of angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas Receptor axis induction to control disease severity due to its anti-inflammatory, vasodilator, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticoagulant, antiangiogenic and fibrosis inhibitory effects. The renin angiotensin-system peptide Angiotensin-(1-7) shows a high therapeutic potential for COVID-19 mainly because of its ability to counteract the adverse effects caused in various organs due to angiotensin II-converting enzyme blockade. In light of these factors, the use of convalescent plasma conjugated therapy and Ang (1-7) agonists for the treatment of COVID-19 patients could be recommended. The differential expression of ACE2 and the varied response to SARS-CoV-2 are thought to be connected. According to several investigations, ACE2 antibodies and pharmacological inhibitors might be used to prevent viral entry. Given its capacity to eliminate the virus while ensuring lung and cardiovascular protection by regulating the inflammatory response, angiotensin-(1-7) is expected to be a safe choice. However, more clinical evidence is required to clarify the therapeutic usage of this peptide. The aim of this review article is to present an update of scientific data and clinical trials on the therapeutic potential of angiotensin-(1-7) in patients with COVID-19.

3.
Am J Public Health ; : e1-e5, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2141113

ABSTRACT

People experiencing homelessness (PEH) have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, yet their vaccination coverage is lower than is that of the general population. We implemented a COVID-19 vaccination program that used evidence-based and culturally tailored approaches to promote vaccine uptake and equity for PEH in Los Angeles County, California. From February 2021 through February 2022, 33 977 doses of vaccine were administered at 2658 clinics, and 9275 PEH were fully vaccinated. This program may serve as a model for future service delivery in vulnerable populations. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print December 1, 2022:e1-e5. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.307147).

4.
55th Annual IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Microarchitecture, MICRO 2022 ; 2022-October:727-743, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2136444

ABSTRACT

Genome analysis benefits precise medical care, wildlife conservation, pandemic treatment (e.g., COVID-19), and so on. Unfortunately, in genome analysis, the speed of data processing lags far behind the speed of data generation. Thus, hardware acceleration turns out to be necessary. As many applications in genome analysis are memory-bound, Processing-In-Memory (PIM) and Near-Data-Processing (NDP) solutions have been explored to tackle this problem. In particular, the Dual-Inline-Memory-Module (DIMM) based designs are very promising due to their non-invasive feature to the cost-sensitive DRAM dies. However, they have two critical limitations, i.e., performance bottle-necked by communication and the limited potential for memory expansion. In this paper, we address these two limitations by designing novel DIMM based accelerators located near the dis-aggregated memory pool with the support from the Compute Express Link (CXL), aiming to leverage the abundant memory within the memory pool and the high communication bandwidth provided by CXL. We propose BEACON, Scalable Near-Data-Processing Accelerators for Genome Analysis near Memory Pool with the CXL Support. BEAC-ON ad-opts a software-hardware co-design approach to tackle the above two limitations. The BEACON architecture builds the foundation for efficient communication and memory expansion by reducing data movement and leveraging the high communication bandwidth provided by CXL. Based on the BEACON architecture, we propose a memory management framework to enable memory expansion with unmodified CXL-DIMMs and further optimize communication by improving data locality. We also propose algorithm-specific optimizations to further boost the performance of BEACON. In addition, BEACON provides two design choices, i.e., BEACON- D and BEACON-S. BEACON-D and BEACON-S perform the computation within the enhanced CXL-DIMMs and enhanced CXL-Switches, respectively. Experimental results show that compared with state-of-the-art DIMM based NDP accelerators, on average, BEACON-D and BEACON-S improve the performance by 4. 70x and 4. 13x, respectively. © 2022 IEEE.

5.
JAMA Network Open ; 5(12):e2244486, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127465

ABSTRACT

Importance: Long-term sequelae after symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection may impact well-being, yet existing data primarily focus on discrete symptoms and/or health care use.

6.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 33:62, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2126312

ABSTRACT

Background: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is being increasingly used among critically ill patients some of whom have multiple organ failure and need concurrent use of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Limited data are available regarding outcomes among such patients. Method(s): We report retrospective data on patients who were treated with ECMO with or without CRRT over a period of 36 months (Jan 2019 - Mar 2022) at hospitals within a single integrated healthcare system in Pennsylvania. Patients with end stage renal disease were not eligible to receive ECMO within this system. Result(s): 166 patients were treated with ECMO of whom 50 (30.1%) received CRRT during the course of their treatment. Mean age of patients on ECMO was 52.1 years (interquartile range 43-64), 68.1% were male;and 23.5% had Covid-19. Reasons for ECMO included cardiac arrest (43%), post cardiac surgery (18%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (38%) and transcatheter aortic valve placement (2%). Patients received either Venoarterial (VA) ECMO (45.8% patients;mean age 60.0) and its variant extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) (9.6%;mean age 50.9) or Venovenous (VV) ECMO (44.6%;mean age 44.4). A comparison among patients who needed CRRT versus those who did not is provided in figure 1. 38% patients who received CRRT survived to discharge compared to 62.9% who did not receive CRRT (p=0.003) Conclusion(s): Nearly 1 in 3 patients treated with ECMO needed CRRT at some point during their care. Patients who needed CRRT on ECMO were significantly less likely to survive to discharge. Nephrology service was involved in the care of ECMO patients from the beginning in some cases. However, there remains a need for early multi-disciplinary care for critically ill patients requiring ECMO therapy. (Table Presented).

7.
J Acad Consult Liaison Psychiatry ; 63:S129-30, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2119638
9.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons ; 235(5):S28-S28, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083987
10.
Antimicrob Steward Healthc Epidemiol ; 1(Suppl 1):s59, 2021.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2076894

ABSTRACT

Background: Diagnostic stewardship modifies the ordering, performing, and reporting of diagnostic tests to optimize clinical care and infection prevention while conserving healthcare resources. Timely and accurate diagnosis of respiratory virus infections can optimize the use of antibiotics, antivirals, ancillary tests, and inpatient beds. Influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) are frequently caused by viruses. However, before COVID-19, specific antiviral medication was commonly used only for the treatment of influenza virus infections. Methods: Eskenazi Health (EH) had 2 respiratory PCR assays: influenza/RSV ($58.18 per assay) and a 20-pathogen respiratory pathogens panel (RPP) ($129 per assay). An inpatient ILI algorithm was developed and implemented in the electronic health record (EHR) in October 2018 to guide the selection of the appropriate assay (Figure 1). Ambulatory testing defaulted to the influenza/RSV assay. Prescribers retained the ability to override recommendations. We performed a retrospective chart review of all orders for RPP and influenza/RSV assays before implementation of the ILI algorithm (October 1, 2017, to September 30, 2018) and after implementation (October 1, 2018, to September 30, 2019). The primary end point was the number of RPP assays ordered. The secondary end point was the appropriateness of RPP assays ordered (ie, met ≥1 criteria) and number of influenza/RSVs assays ordered with virus detected. Results: Before the implementation of the intervention, 1,882 orders were reviewed. After implementation 1,621 orders were reviewed. All influenza/RSV and RPP assays were included if they were ordered between October 1, 2017, and September 30, 2019, at EH. There were no exclusion criteria. After implementation, RPP assays decreased ~40% (Table 1), with associated cost savings of $35,368.68 (22.6% of total assay costs;$163,742.88 before implementation and $128,374.20 after implementation). Although some of this reduction could be attributed to the lower number of overall assays ordered, the 40% reduction in RPP assays exceeded the 14% decrease in overall orders, demonstrating improvement in utilization of RPP assays. A corresponding increase in influenza/RSV assay orders was not observed;both groups had similar total influenza/RSV orders. Both groups also had similar percentages of viruses detected with influenza/RSV and RPP (33% before vs 31% after). After implementation, 1,522 (94%) of 1,621 orders followed the recommendations of the ILI algorithm (Table 2). Several prescribers ordered influenza/RSV despite the patient meeting criteria for RPP assay;of these 26 assays, 4 (15%) resulted in virus detection. Of the 73 instances in which prescribers bypassed recommendations for the influenza/RSV assay and ordered an RPP assay, 14 (19%) of the assays resulted in virus detection;only 1 of 14 was a virus that would have been detected by the influenza/RSV. We were unable to identify any trends that would assist in developing additional order questions to capture these patients. Conclusions: Implementation of the ILI algorithm was associated with high adherence, improvement in the appropriateness of ordering, and significant cost savings.Funding: NoDisclosures: NoneFigure 1.Table 1.Table 2.

12.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):1060, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063522

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Liver transplant (LT) recipients have a decreased response to 2 doses of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine compared to the general population, so we aimed to understand response to a third dose to inform vaccination strategies. Method(s): LT recipients in our observational cohort who received 3 homologous mRNA vaccines and available antibody levels pre- and post-dose 3 (D3) were identified. Those who reported a prior COVID-19 diagnosis or used belatacept were excluded. The peak anti-spike antibody level collected between the second (D2) and third dose (D3), was compared to the antibody level at 1 month post-D3. Samples were tested with Roche Elecsys Anti-Sars-CoV-2 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (positive >=0.8 U/mL) or EUROIMMUN EIA (positive >=1.1 AU). Result(s): 146 participants completed 3 homologous doses of BNT162b2 (53%) or mRNA-1273 (47%) vaccines between 5/15/2021 - 11/8/2021. The median (IQR) time of peak pre-D3 antibody collection was 89 (31, 104) days post-D2. The median time of 1-month post-D3 antibody collection was 30 (23, 33) days. The median time between D2 and D3 was 168 (149-188) days. Overall, 125/146 (86%) were seropositive pre-D3, and 139/146 (95%) were seropositive post-D3 (Figure 1). There were no seroreversions post D3, and among the 21 seronegative recipients pre-D3, 14 (67%) seroconverted post-D3. Risk factors significantly associated with persistent seronegativity post-D3 were less time since LT (1.3 vs 6 years, p=0.042), mycophenolate use (100% vs 37%, p=0.001), BNT162b2 series (100% vs 50%, p=0.01), and pre-D3 seronegative status (86% vs 10%, p<0.001). Conclusion(s): Most LT recipients have excellent responses to a third homologous mRNA vaccine dose, greater than that seen in other transplant recipients. Persons seronegative after D2, however, show weaker response and may remain at high risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection despite D3.

13.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):763, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063481

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Kidney transplant recipients taking belatacept (KTR-B) have poor immune response to two-dose SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. We sought to characterize the impact of an additional vaccine dose on plasma neutralizing capacity and cellular responses as compared to that of KTRs controls (KTR-C) not taking belatacept. Method(s): Within an observational cohort, we tested 26 KTR-Bs and 27 KTR-Cs for anti-spike antibody responses before and after a third SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose (D3) using two clinical assays (Roche Elecsys anti-S Ig and EUROIMMUN anti-S1 IgG). For a subset of 5 KTR-Bs and for all KTR-Cs we used a research assay (Meso Scale Diagnostics V-Plex [MSD]) to further assess anti-spike and RBD IgG, as well as surrogate plasma neutralizing activity (% ACE2 inhibition) versus the ancestral and delta variants. For 3 KTR-Bs, post D3 T cell response was assessed via IFN-y ELISpot and deemed positive if spot forming units > 20 per million PBMC and stimulation index > 3. Result(s): KTR-Bs had significant lower clinical anti-spike seroconversion than KTR-Cs (31% vs 74%, p=0.001) after D3 despite similar demographics, clinical factors, and vaccines administered (Table 1). No KTR-B (0/5) was seropositive by MSD anti-spike or anti-RBD IgG (Figure 1). % ACE2 inhibition versus the ancestral variant was significantly lower in KTR-Bs than in KTR-Cs (Median [IQR] 5.2 [2.8, 6.5] vs 12.5 [7.7, 23.9], p<0.01);all KTR-Bs were below a level consistent with detectable neutralizing antibody. All tested KTR-Bs (3/3) had a negative ELISpot, consistent with negligible cellular response. Conclusion(s): These results suggest minimal humoral or cellular immunogenicity of additional vaccine doses for KTR-Bs and indicates the need for alternative strategies to improve vaccine response such as immunosuppression alteration or use of passive immunoprophylaxis with monoclonal anti-spike antibody to improve protection versus SARS-CoV-2.

14.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):768-769, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063432

ABSTRACT

Purpose: nti-spike antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination is diminished in LT recipients compared to the general population so understanding durability for those that do respond is critical to mitigating risks of infection. We measured serial antibody titers in LT recipients for 6 months after two-dose mRNA vaccine series to describe kinetics and sero-reversion rates. Method(s): LT recipients without known prior COVID-19 had anti-spike antibody testing at 1, 3, and 6 months after the second dose of mRNA vaccine (D2) using two commercial assays (Roche Elecsys anti-receptor binding domain immunoassay (EIA) [positive >=0.8 U/mL] or EUROIMMUN anti-S1 EIA [positive >=1.1 AU]). We compared titer distributions over time and identified factors associated with sero-reversion. Result(s): 180 LT recipients received BNT162b2 (48%) or mRNA-1273 (52%) 2-dose series between 1/7/2021-5/7/2021. At 1 month post-D2 (n=173), 146 (84%) had positive antibody levels at a median (IQR) of 30 (28, 32) days post-D2. At 3 months post-D2 (n=164), 149 (91%) had positive levels at a median of 92 (90, 96) days post-D2. At 6 months post-D2 (n=73), 62 (85%) had positive levels at a median of 180 (176, 185) days post-D2. Among the 66 seropositive at 1 or 3 months post-D2, 58 (88%) remained seropositive by 6 months post-D2. Neither age, years since transplant, vaccine type, nor mycophenolate (MMF) use were associated with sero-reversion, though there was a trend toward more triple immunosuppressive use (25% vs 3%, p=0.07). Of those Roche-tested, the median anti-RBD levels were >=250 U/mL (14, >=250;n=120) at 1 month post-D2, >=250 U/mL (58, >=250;n=113) at 3 months, and >=250 U/mL (30, >=250;n=49) at 6 months . Of those EUROIMMUN-tested, the median anti-S1 levels were 7.25 AU (4.31, 8.71;n=53) at 1 month, 5.71 AU (1.27, 7.90;n=51) at 3 months, and 1.73 AU (0.76, 6.01;n=25) at 6 months. Conclusion(s): Overall, most LT recipients demonstrated 6 month durability of anti-spike antibody following vaccination, but a subset did sero-revert, potentially associated with heavier immunosuppression. Further investigation into clinical consequences of waning antibody levels is key to guide timing of additional vaccine doses.

15.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):440, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063372

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) use is associated with decreased antibody response to the SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine series in heart and lung transplant recipients (HLTRs). Higher MMF doses have been associated with poor immunogenicity in kidney transplant recipients, but limited data exist on HLTRs. We evaluated the relationship between daily MMF dose and vaccine-induced antibody response in HLTRs. Method(s): HLTRs (n= 212) from an observational cohort were categorized by daily MMF doses (None, Low: <1000mg, Moderate: 1000-2000mg, High: >=2000mg). Semi-quantitative antibody testing was performed at 1, 3, and 6-months post-dose 2 (D2) using the Roche Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2 S enzyme immunoassay (EIA), testing for antibodies to SARSCoV2 spike protein receptor binding domain, and the EUROIMMUN EIA, testing for S1 domain of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate the risk of a negative antibody response with increasing MMF dose. Result(s): At the time of vaccination, 94 (44.3%) HLTRs reported receiving no MMF, 33 (15.6%) reported a low dose, 54 (25.7%) reported a moderate dose, and 31 (14.8%) reported a high dose regimen. There were statistically significant differences in the number of participants on mTOR inhibitors and Triple immunosuppression among the groups but the participants in all 4 dose categories were otherwise comparable (Table 1) The risk ratio of a negative post-D2 titer with low, moderate and high dose regimens compared to no MMF was 0.65 1.15 2.05 (p=0.63), 1.34 2.043.10 (p=0.001) and 1.83 2.77 4.21 (p<0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, vaccine type, time since transplant, and corticosteroid use. Conclusion(s): HLTRs taking MMF >1000mg/day are at higher risk of remaining seronegative after mRNA vaccination, with evidence of a dose-nonresponse effect. The findings support the exploration of whether targeted MMF reduction strategies in HLTRs increase SARS-CoV-2 vaccine immunogenicity. (Table Presented).

16.
American Journal of Transplantation ; 22(Supplement 3):406, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2063340

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To compare antibody response to a third dose (D3) of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) with negative or low-positive antibody levels after 2-dose mRNA vaccination across D3 platforms. Method(s): From our observational study, 532 SOTRs who developed suboptimal antibody responses to 2-dose mRNA vaccination (Roche<50 U/mL or EUROIMMUN <1.1 AU) were selected. Belatacept recipients and persons with any COVID-19 diagnosis were excluded. We compared post-D3 antibody levels among SOTRs who received an mRNA vaccine for D3 (n=487) versus Ad.26.COV2.S for D3 (n=45). Poisson regression with robust standard error was used to study the association between vaccine platform and seroconversion, adjusting for immunosuppression, age, time since transplant, and liver transplant status. Result(s): Pre-D3, 342 SOTRs (64%) were seronegative, of whom 107 (31%) developed high-positive antibody levels post-D3. In contrast, of the 190 (36%) with low-positive pre-D3 antibody levels, 172 (91%) were high-positive post-D3 (Figure 1). Among SOTRs seronegative pre-D3, 1.8x more Ad.26.COV2.S D3 recipients seroconverted compared to mRNA D3 recipients (49.7% vs 27.8%, Fisher's exact=0.014) (Figure 2). Among the pre-D3 seronegative group, there was a 2x higher chance of developing high-positive post-D3 levels with Ad.26.COV2.S compared to mRNA D3 (IRR =1.42.02.9, p<0.001). This was despite the Ad.26. COV2.S D3 group having fewer younger patients and liver transplant recipients, factors that are associated with higher odds of positive antibody response. 165 SOTRs (31%) remained seronegative after D3 (22% of Ad.26.COV2.S recipients vs 32% of mRNA recipients). Conclusion(s): Heterologous boosting with Ad.26.COV2.S may be a promising vaccination option for SOTRs with poor response to the 2-dose mRNA series, particularly among those who are seronegative. (Table Presented).

17.
Chest ; 162(4):A604, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060645

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: COVID-19 Co-Infections SESSION TYPE: Rapid Fire Case Reports PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 12:45 pm - 1:45 pm INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 has been associated with co-infecting pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Little has been reported about community acquired atypical bacterial co-infections with SARS-CoV-2. We present a case of a patient with recent COVID-19 pneumonia and diagnosis of Legionella and Mycoplasma pneumonia, in addition of E. coli and C. perfringens bacteremia, that emphasizes SARS-CoV-2 impact in human immunity and the need to consider community acquired infections. CASE PRESENTATION: A 64-year-old male with history of hypertension, alcohol use disorder, iron deficiency anemia, and recent COVID-19 pneumonia presented to the ED with shortness of breath, dark urine, and increased confusion. The patient was admitted to the hospital a week prior with COVID-19 pneumonia and acute kidney injury. He received dexamethasone, remdesivir, and IV fluids. After 8 days, he was discharged home. Upon evaluation, he was afebrile and normotensive, but tachycardic, 129/min, on 4 L of nasal cannula sating 100%. On exam, the patient was oriented only to person and had decreased breath sounds bilaterally. Labs revealed an elevated WBC, 15.3 K/mcL, with left shift, low Hgb, 7.8 g/dL, with low MCV, 61 fL, increased BUN/Cr, 56 mg/dL and 2.8 mg/dL, and an abnormal hepatic panel, AST 121 U/L, ALT 45 U/L, alkaline phosphatase 153 U/L. Ammonia, GGT, CPK and lactic acid were within normal range;but the D-dimer and procalcitonin were elevated, 4618 ng/mL and 25.12 ng/mL, respectively. A urinalysis showed gross pyuria, positive leukocyte esterase and mild proteinuria. CT head showed no acute abnormalities, but the chest X-Ray revealed a hazy opacity in the left mid and lower lung, followed by a CT chest that demonstrated peripheral and lower lobe ground glass opacities and a CT abdomen that showed right sided perinephric and periureteral stranding. Given increased risk for thromboembolism, a VQ scan was done being negative for pulmonary embolism. The patient was admitted with acute metabolic encephalopathy, acute kidney injury, transaminitis, pyelonephritis and concern for hospital acquired pneumonia. Vancomycin, cefepime and metronidazole were ordered. HIV screen was negative. COVID-19 PCR, Legionella urine antigen and Mycoplasma IgG and IgM serologies were positive. Blood cultures grew E. coli and C. perfringens. Infectious Disease and Gastroenterology were consulted. The patient was started on azithromycin and a colonoscopy was done showing only diverticulosis. After an extended hospital course, the patient was cleared for discharge, without oxygen needs, to a nursing home with appropriate follow up. DISCUSSION: Co-infection with bacteria causing atypical pneumonia and bacteremia should be considered in patients with recent or current SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Prompt identification of co-existing pathogens can promote a safe and evidence-based approach to the treatment of patients with SARS-CoV-2. Reference #1: Alhuofie S. (2021). An Elderly COVID-19 Patient with Community-Acquired Legionella and Mycoplasma Coinfections: A Rare Case Report. Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland), 9(11), 1598. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111598 Reference #2: Hoque, M. N., Akter, S., Mishu, I. D., Islam, M. R., Rahman, M. S., Akhter, M., Islam, I., Hasan, M. M., Rahaman, M. M., Sultana, M., Islam, T., & Hossain, M. A. (2021). Microbial co-infections in COVID-19: Associated microbiota and underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis. Microbial pathogenesis, 156, 104941. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2021.104941 Reference #3: Zhu, X., Ge, Y., Wu, T., Zhao, K., Chen, Y., Wu, B., Zhu, F., Zhu, B., & Cui, L. (2020). Co-infection with respiratory pathogens among COVID-2019 cases. Virus research, 285, 198005. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2020.198005 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Albert Chang No relevant relationships by Eric Chang No relevant relationships by KOMAL KAUR No relevant relationships by Katiria Pintor Jime ez

18.
Chest ; 162(4):A492, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060609

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Medications and Pulmonary Rehabilitation in COVID-19 Posters SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/18/2022 01:30 pm - 02:30 pm PURPOSE: Millions of people have survived COVID 19 infection and are living with post-acute sequelae of COVID (PASC). Multi-disciplinary programs have been established to provide follow-up to these patients. Currently, there are limited data regarding the effectiveness of these programs and it is uncertain if there is a mortality benefit. Here, we explore if the enrollment of Veterans into a multi-disciplinary COVID-19 follow-up program influences long term all-cause mortality. METHODS: We designed a retrospective cohort study at the South Texas Veteran Health Care system (STVHCS) from April 1, 2020, to December 31, 2020. Participants in the study were Veterans who survived a COVID 19 infection after 30 days and were eligible for enrollment in the STVHCS Convalescence Program (“The Program”), which conducts multi-disciplinary follow up care. Patients who died <30 days after COVID 19 diagnosis were not eligible. The primary outcome of long term all-cause mortality was defined as mortality within 31-365 days after the diagnosis of a COVID 19 infection. Demographic differences and primary outcome between the two groups (enrolled versus non-enrolled in The Program) were analyzed using Chi square for categorical variables. Continuous variables were analyzed using Student’s t-test. RESULTS: In total 2253 patients were eligible for enrollment, of which 557 were enrolled and 1696 were not enrolled. Long term all-cause mortality between the groups was 6/557 (1.07%) in the enrolled group compared to 78/1696 (4.59%) in the non-enrolled group with a p value of <0.001. There was no statistical difference between the groups based on the average Charlson comorbidity index score, 2.12 vs 2.09 respectively, with a p value = 0.85. CONCLUSIONS: Enrollment of Veterans in a COVID 19 multidisciplinary follow-up program is associated with a significant decrease in long term all-cause mortality. These differences could not be explained by inherent differences between groups. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Our study shows the potential effectiveness of COVID-19 multidisciplinary follow-up programs to reduce long term all cause mortality in survivors of COVID. In addition there may be other benefits not yet explored such as reduction in symptom burden from COVID and decreased psychosocial distress. The generalizability of this study is limited by its observational study design, the voluntary nature of enrollment in the program and lack of non veterans in the population. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Ye Aung No relevant relationships by Ryan Choudhury No relevant relationships by Michael Mader No relevant relationships by Marcos Restrepo No relevant relationships by Sandra Sanchez-Reilly No relevant relationships by Monica Serra No relevant relationships by Ana Lucia Siu Chang No relevant relationships by Hanh Trinh

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