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1.
Complement Ther Med ; 67: 102827, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768027

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: With the expansion of the internet, social media platforms have become a major source of medical information. However, medical information on online multimedia platforms is often inaccurate. In the current study, we evaluated the reliability, quality, and accuracy of the most viewed YouTube videos featuring the effects of vitamin C on COVID-19. METHODS: A search was conducted on YouTube on January 13, 2022, using the keywords ("ascorbic acid" OR "vitamin C" OR "sodium ascorbate" OR "L-ascorbic") AND ("coronavirus" OR "COVID 19" OR "COVID-19" OR "Corona" OR "COVID" OR "SARSCoV2"). We assessed the 50 most-viewed videos using a modified DISCERN scale (mDISCERN) and Global Quality Scale (GQS). Additionally, the accuracy of the information in each video was evaluated. RESULTS: Out of the 50 most-viewed videos featuring the effect of vitamin C on COVID-19, 54% were not reliable. Furthermore, 62% presented poor quality, and 74% were misleading or neither accurate nor misleading. The average mDISCERN and GQS scores of the 50 included videos were 2.2 ± 1.4 (≥ 3: highly reliable) and 2.2 ± 1.1 (2: generally poor), respectively. Although the videos were made by medical doctors, their reliability, quality, and accuracy were not significantly different from those displayed in other sources, including fitness channels, television or internet-based news or programs, consumers, company channels, product advertisements, or prepared by nurses. CONCLUSIONS: The reliability, quality, and accuracy of the 50 most-viewed videos on the effect of vitamin C on COVID-19 were not high. Video creators, especially medical doctors, should make an effort so that the videos present reliable content with high-quality and correct information is disseminated to people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Information Dissemination , Reproducibility of Results , Video Recording
2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308044

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is rapidly spreading worldwide. Although 10%–20% of patients with COVID-19 have severe symptoms, little is known about the risk factors related to the aggravation of COVID-19 symptoms from asymptomatic or mild to severe disease states. Methods: : This retrospective study included 211 patients who were asymptomatic or with mild presentations of COVID-19. We evaluated the differences in in demographic and clinical data between the cured (discharged to home) and transferred (aggravated to severe-stage COVID-19) groups. Results: : A multivariate logistic analysis showed that body temperature, chills, initial chest X-ray findings, and the presence of diabetes were significantly associated with predicting the progression to severe stage of COVID-19 (p < 0.05). The odds ratio of transfer in patients with COVID-19 increased by 12.7-fold for abnormal findings such as haziness or consolidation in initial chest X-ray, 6.32-fold for initial symptom of chills, and 64.1-fold for diabetes. Conclusions: : Even if patients are asymptomatic or have mild symptoms, clinicians should closely observe patients with COVID-19 presenting with chills, body temperature >37.5°C, findings of pneumonia in chest X-ray, or diabetes.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308043

ABSTRACT

Background: There was an outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Daegu, the Republic of Korea, in 2020. We investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among patients with COVID-19 who were treated and discharged at a university hospital in Daegu, Korea. Methods A total of 64 patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and hospitalized, treated, and discharged from a university hospital between February and April 2020 participated to our study. We conducted a phone interview and evaluated the presence of PTSD using the PTSD checklist (PCL-5) from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5;score range: 0 to 80). If a score ≥ 33 was obtained, then a diagnosis of PTSD was rendered. Results Thirteen patients scored \(\ge\)33 on the PCL-5, which indicated that 20.3% (13/64) of the patients had PTSD. No statistically significant differences in the demographic data, including sex, age, hospitalization time, and duration after discharge, were observed between the patients with PTSD and those without PTSD. Conclusions We found that 20% of patients with COVID-19 who were hospitalized, treated, and discharged had PTSD. Accordingly, clinicians should be aware of the high possibility of PTSD among COVID-19 patients and mental health support among the infected patients should be provided.

4.
J Yeungnam Med Sci ; 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675253

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly spread worldwide, leading the World Health Organization to declare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic. To curb the unchecked spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection, most countries have enforced travel restrictions. However, it is debatable whether such restrictions are effective in containing infections and preventing pandemics. Rather, they may negatively impact economies and diplomatic relationships. Each government should conduct an extensive and appropriate analysis of its national economy, diplomatic status, and COVID-19 preparedness to decide whether it is best to restrict entering travelers. Even if travelers from other countries are allowed entry, extensive contact tracing is required to prevent the spread of COVID-19. In addition, governments can implement "travel bubbles," which allow the quarantine-free flow of people among countries with relatively low levels of community transmission. An accurate evaluation of the benefits and losses due to entry restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic would be helpful in determining whether entry restrictions are an effective measure to reduce the spread of infection in future pandemics.

5.
Complement Ther Med ; 64: 102797, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587977

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Vitamin C has anti-inflammatory effects. This review aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of high-dose intravenous vitamin C (HDIVC) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The following key phrases were searched for article inclusion: "Vitamin C OR ascorbic acid" AND "COVID-19 OR coronavirus disease 2019 OR severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 OR SARS-CoV-2″. Articles that utilized HDIVC for the management of patients with COVID-19 were included, whereas review articles and case reports were excluded from this review. Moreover, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate whether HDIVC can reduce the length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality rate of patients with severe COVID-19. RESULTS: In total, eight articles were included in this review, and five studies were included in the meta-analysis. The length of hospital stay was not significantly different between the HDIVC and control groups. Also, although our meta-analysis showed a tendency for HDIVC to reduce the in-hospital mortality rate in patients with severe COVID-19, the in-hospital mortality rate was not significantly different between patients treated with HDIVC and those who did not receive HDIVC. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence supporting the therapeutic use of HDICV in COVID-19 patients is lacking. Further studies are required for drawing a clear conclusion on this topic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Length of Stay , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamins
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25917, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262274

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic. Invasive mechanical ventilation is recommended for the management of patients with COVID-19 who have severe respiratory symptoms. However, various complications can develop after its use. The efficient and appropriate management of patients requires the identification of factors associated with an aggravation of COVID-19 respiratory symptoms to a degree where invasive mechanical ventilation becomes necessary, thereby enabling clinicians to prevent such ventilation. This retrospective study included 138 inpatients with COVID-19 at a tertiary hospital. We evaluated the differences in the demographic and clinical data between 27 patients who required invasive mechanical ventilation and 111 patients who did not. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the duration of fever, national early warning score (NEWS), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels on admission were significantly associated with invasive mechanical ventilation in this cohort. The optimal cut-off values were: fever duration ≥1 day (sensitivity 100.0%, specificity 54.95%), NEWS ≥7 (sensitivity 72.73%, specificity 92.52%), and LDH >810 mg/dL (sensitivity 56.0%, specificity 90.29%). These findings can assist in the early identification of patients who will require invasive mechanical ventilation. Further studies in larger patient populations are recommended to validate our findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Early Warning Score , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
8.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(4)2020 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965953

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emerged from China and rapidly spread to many other countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among patients with COVID-19 who were treated and discharged from a university hospital in Daegu, Korea. Methods: In total, 64 patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and then hospitalized, treated and discharged from the university hospital between February and April 2020 participated in our study. We conducted telephone interviews with the participants and evaluated the presence of PTSD using the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-5 (PCL-5) based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; score range: 0-80). If a score of ≥33 was obtained, then a diagnosis of PTSD was made. We analyzed the association between PTSD and demographic and clinical characteristics using the Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests. Results: In total, 13 patients had a PCL-5 score of ≥33, which indicated that 20.3% (n = 64) of the patients had PTSD. No significant differences were observed in demographic characteristics, including, sex, age, hospitalization time and duration after discharge, between patients with PTSD and those without PTSD. Conclusions: The prevalence rate of PTSD was 20.3% in patients with COVID-19 who had been hospitalized, treated and discharged. Accordingly, clinicians should be aware of the high possibility of PTSD among COVID-19 patients. Mental health interventions supporting the mental health of patients should be provided to affected patients.

9.
Health Policy Technol ; 10(1): 27-28, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898870
10.
Healthcare ; 8(4):373, 2020.
Article | MDPI | ID: covidwho-804369

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emerged from China and rapidly spread to many other countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among patients with COVID-19 who were treated and discharged from a university hospital in Daegu, Korea. Methods: In total, 64 patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and then hospitalized, treated and discharged from the university hospital between February and April 2020 participated in our study. We conducted telephone interviews with the participants and evaluated the presence of PTSD using the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-5 (PCL-5) based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5;score range: 0–80). If a score of ≥33 was obtained, then a diagnosis of PTSD was made. We analyzed the association between PTSD and demographic and clinical characteristics using the Mann–Whitney U and chi-square tests. Results: In total, 13 patients had a PCL-5 score of ≥33, which indicated that 20.3% (n = 64) of the patients had PTSD. No significant differences were observed in demographic characteristics, including, sex, age, hospitalization time and duration after discharge, between patients with PTSD and those without PTSD. Conclusions: The prevalence rate of PTSD was 20.3% in patients with COVID-19 who had been hospitalized, treated and discharged. Accordingly, clinicians should be aware of the high possibility of PTSD among COVID-19 patients. Mental health interventions supporting the mental health of patients should be provided to affected patients.

11.
Nurs Open ; 8(1): 284-289, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777623

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to explore coronavirus disease-related psychological stress in hospital workers in nursing care hospitals during the coronavirus disease epidemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. METHODS: A questionnaire survey was administered to hospital workers at three nursing care hospitals. RESULTS: Fifty-four workers at three nursing care hospitals (9, 29 and 16 works) responded to our survey. Twenty-four workers (50%) scored ≥5 on the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, indicating the presence of anxiety. For the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, six employees (11.1%) scored ≥10 scores, indicating the presence of depression. Workers who lived with other people with chronic underlying diseases showed significantly higher incidence of the presence of anxiety and depression. In binary logistic regression analysis, when living with persons with chronic underlying diseases, the risk of the presence of depression increased. Also, there was a higher incidence of depression in occupational therapists compared with physical therapists and nurses.

12.
Respiration ; 99(9): 748-754, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748829

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the damage to the respiratory system in asymptomatic patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). OBJECTIVE: Herein, we evaluate the findings of chest computed tomography (CT) and radiography in patients with COVID-19 who were asymptomatic. METHODS: We retrospectively investigated patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 but who did not show any symptoms. Among the 139 patients with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in Yeungnam University Hopistal in Daegu, South Korea, 10 (7.2%) were asymptomatic. Their chest CT and radiographic findings were analyzed. RESULTS: In the results, all patients (100%) had ground-glass opacity (GGO) on chest CT. Further, the GGO lesions were predominantly distributed peripherally and posteriorly in all patients. In 9 (90%) patients, the GGO lesions were combined with reticular opacity. Air bronchogram due to bronchiolectasis surrounded by GGO was observed in 8 patients (80%). Additionally, the lung lesions were dominant on the right side in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, considering our results that the lung is affected in asymptomatic patients, it will be necessary to extend the indications of COVID-19 testing for effective management of COVID-19 during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , Bronchiectasis/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchioles/diagnostic imaging , Bronchography , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Combinations , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Radiography, Thoracic , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
13.
Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) ; 35(3): 595-601, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742867

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic, which prompts a consensus for the necessity to seek risk factors for this critical disease. Risk factors affecting mortality of the disease remain elusive. Diabetes and hyperglycemia are known to negatively affect a host's antiviral immunity. We evaluated the relationship between a history of diabetes, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and mortality among severely ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study that assessed 106 adult inpatients (aged ≥18 years) from two tertiary hospitals in Daegu, South Korea. The participants were transferred to tertiary hospitals because their medical condition required immediate intensive care. The demographic and laboratory data were compared between COVID-19 patients who survived and those who did not. RESULTS: Compared with the survivor group, age, and the proportions of diabetes, chronic lung disease and FPG were significantly higher in the deceased group. In the Cox proportional hazards regression model for survival analysis, FPG level and age were identified as significant predictors of mortality (P<0.05). The threshold values for predicting high mortality were age >68 years and FPG of 168 mg/dL, respectively. Among those without diabetes, high FPG remained a significant predictor of mortality (P<0.04). CONCLUSION: High FPG levels significantly predicted mortality in COVID-19, regardless of a known history of diabetes. These results suggest intensive monitoring should be provided to COVID-19 patients who have a high FPG level.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Glucose/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Fasting/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Proportional Hazards Models , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis
14.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(3)2020 Jul 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670023

ABSTRACT

South Korea has experienced difficulty in controlling the spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) during the early stages of the outbreak. South Korea remains passionately determined to protect Koreans against COVID-19 and through trial and error hopes to improve the strategies used to limit the outbreak. Here, we review how COVID-19 spread and what prevention strategies were implemented during the early stages of the outbreak in South Korea. We investigated online newspapers published in South Korea from 21 January 2020 to 20 March 2020, and reviewed academic medical articles related to COVID-19. Additionally, we acquired data on COVID-19 cases through the official website for COVID-19 in South Korea. To date, numerous measures have been applied by the government and the medical community during the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak including the reporting of methods for diagnostic testing, patient classification, the introduction of drive-through screening centers, COVID-19 preventive measures, implementation of government policies for the shortage of face masks, and entry restrictions. Here, we present data from the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak and measures to prevent its spread in South Korea. We believe that sharing the experience of South Korea during the COVID-19 outbreak can help other countries to implement strategies to prevent its rapid transmission.

15.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(3)2020 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-637963

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread rapidly worldwide. We aimed to review the strategies used by our university hospital in Daegu (South Korea) to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 within our institution. We also investigated the actual situation at our hospital against the recommended guidelines. We conducted a survey among patients and staff in our hospital. Additionally, patients' electronic medical records were reviewed along with closed-circuit television (CCTV) recordings. Various strategies and guidelines developed by our hospital have been implemented. A total of 303 hospital staff and patients had exposure to 29 confirmed COVID-19 patients. Of them, three tested positive for COVID-19 without further transmission. The intra-hospital infection of the disease occurred when the recommended strategies and guidelines such as wearing a mask and isolating for 2 weeks were not followed. In conclusion, the implementation of robust guidelines for preventing the intra-hospital transmission of COVID-19 is essential.

16.
Neurol Sci ; 41(9): 2317-2324, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635550

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the current study, we evaluated factors that increase the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patient death rate by analyzing the data from two cohort hospitals. In addition, we studied whether underlying neurological diseases are risk factors for death. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we included 103 adult inpatients (aged ≥ 18 years). We evaluated differences in demographic data between surviving and non-surviving COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: In a multivariate logistic analysis, age and the presence of chronic lung disease and Alzheimer's dementia (AD) were the only significant parameters for predicting COVID-19 non-survival (p < 0.05). However, hypertension, coronary vascular disease, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and history of taking angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), were not significantly associated with the death of COVID-19 patients. The optimal cutoff value obtained from the maximum Youden index was 70 (sensitivity, 80.77%; specificity, 61.04%), and the odds ratio of non-survival increased 1.055 fold for every year of age. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should closely monitor and manage the symptoms of COVID-19 patients who are over the age of 70 years or have chronic lung disease or AD.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 445, 2020 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is rapidly spreading worldwide. Although 10-20% of patients with COVID-19 have severe symptoms, little is known about the risk factors related to the aggravation of COVID-19 symptoms from asymptomatic or mild to severe disease states. METHODS: This retrospective study included 211 patients who were asymptomatic or with mild presentations of COVID-19. We evaluated the differences in demographic and clinical data between the cured (discharged to home) and transferred (aggravated to severe-stage COVID-19) groups. RESULTS: A multivariate logistic analysis showed that body temperature, chills, initial chest X-ray findings, and the presence of diabetes were significantly associated with predicting the progression to severe stage of COVID-19 (p < 0.05). The odds ratio of transfer in patients with COVID-19 increased by 12.7-fold for abnormal findings such as haziness or consolidation in initial chest X-ray, 6.32-fold for initial symptom of chills, and 64.1-fold for diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Even if patients are asymptomatic or have mild symptoms, clinicians should closely observe patients with COVID-19 presenting with chills, body temperature > 37.5 °C, findings of pneumonia in chest X-ray, or diabetes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Diabetes Complications , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(2)2020 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-378206

ABSTRACT

In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of a drive-through (DT) screening system for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by comparing it with a conventional screening system. We reviewed and analyzed the SARS-CoV-2 screening data obtained at our university hospital. We compared the number of tests for SARS-CoV-2 (using real-time polymerase chain reaction) performed using two different specimen collection systems-DT and conventional-during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in Daegu. Based on the results, the DT screening system collected 5.8 times more specimens for testing than the conventional screening system. From January 27 to 31 March 2020, 6211 individuals were screened for SARS-CoV-2 infection using either the DT or conventional system. In total, 217 individuals tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (positive rate: 3.50%). Of the 6211 individuals, 3368 were symptomatic or had a history of contact with COVID-19 patients, and 142 of them tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (positive rate: 4.22%). Further, 2843 individuals were asymptomatic and had no history of contact with COVID-19 patients, and 75 of them tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (positive rate: 2.64%). In conclusion, the DT system allowed clinicians to collect specimens for SARS-CoV-2 screening more efficiently than the conventional system. Furthermore, as there might be several COVID-19 patients who remain asymptomatic, expanding the screening test to asymptomatic individuals would be necessary.

19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(10)2020 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-361470

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the mental health burden of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on physical therapists, including their stress and anxiety levels, who were at risk of developing psychological distress and other mental health symptoms. A questionnaire survey was conducted with physical therapists of three university hospitals in South Korea on 10 April 2020. The questionnaires evaluated the presence of anxiety and depression in the respondents. Among the 65 physical therapists who completed our survey, 21 (32.3%) and 12 (18.5%) physical therapists reported having symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively. If a physical therapist was living with a ≤6-year-old infant or child, the possibility of the presence of anxiety was significantly higher. The risk of depression among those who were in their 30 s and 50 s was significantly higher than among those in their 20 s. Thus, physical therapists living with a ≤6-year-old infant or child and those in their 30 s and 50 s need special attention.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Depression/therapy , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physical Therapists , Pneumonia, Viral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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