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1.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040595

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media use in neurosurgery remains an understudied phenomenon. Our study aims to examine the global membership and engagement of the prominent Neurosurgery Cocktail Facebook group with over 25,000 neurosurgeons and trainees worldwide, specifically during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Neurosurgery Cocktail's numbers of members, posts, comments, and reactions were collected from December 2019 to November 2020. Anonymized aggregate data of members' characteristics, including age, sex, and country of origin in November 2020, were also obtained. The most engaging posts in November 2020 were categorized into topics by a majority consensus of 3 reviewers. RESULTS: The average number of members steadily increased from 21,266 in December 2019 to 25,218 in November 2020. In November 2020, 18.8% of members were women, and 71.3% were between 25-44 years old. With members from 100 countries, 77.9% are from low-and middle-income countries, with the highest representation from India, Egypt, and Brazil. After the COVID-19 pandemic declaration, daily engagement peaked in April 2020 with a daily average of 41.63 posts, 336.4 comments, and 1,914.6 reactions before returning to prepandemic levels. Among the 99 top posts in November 2020, the majority (56.5%) were classified as "interesting cases", with "education-related" as the second-most common topic (16.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Neurosurgery Cocktail has shown steady growth since its creation. The COVID-19 pandemic was correlated with a spike in activity without lasting impact. The group demonstrates social media's potential for knowledge exchange and promoting organic international collaborations.

2.
World Neurosurg ; 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic committees of all countries restricted face-to-face interactions. This study aimed to determine how the pandemic changed the research output for many neurosurgeons while highlighting how social media may have been used as a contactless platform to maintain research productivity during these times. METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive, 24-item, and non-randomized online survey was applied worldwide, and shared using social media platforms and emails. The questions mainly focused on comparing the results of the pre-pandemic period to the pandemic period (after March 2020). RESULTS: A total of 202 respondents from 60 different countries responded to the survey. Interest in neurosurgical education increased from 24% to 76%, while the topic of epidemiology gained interest from 28% to 72% when the pre-pandemic era was compared to the pandemic era. Preference for prospective studies decreased from 66% to 34%, while interest in retrospective studies increased from 39% to 61%. In evaluating publication types, the preference for reviews increased from 36% to 64%. Sixty-two percent of the respondents stated they had concerns over delays in individual contributions/lack of accountability. These concerns were followed by problems with theft of intellectual property/data and authorship disputes. Forty-one percent believed that the support of extra hands on a load-heavy project was the most powerful benefit of social media collaboration. Those who reported increased publications during the pandemic were also more likely to collaborate using social media (P = 0.030). CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, social media collaborations helped increase research output for neurosurgeons.

3.
Acta Inform Med ; 30(1): 11-17, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822558

ABSTRACT

Background: Scientometrics, a subfield of bibliometrics, examines scientific publications by using bibliometric methods. The aim of a scientometric study is to study the various citation-based metrics of scientific articles, such as parameters pertaining to authors (including institutions and country of origin), articles, journals, and other citation related metrics. Objective: In this second part of our scientometric analysis of the 6 major neurosurgical journals from 2011-2020, we study journal and author trends, yearly publication trends, and citation related metrics in Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Operative Neurosurgery, and World Neurosurgery. Methods: We analyzed parameters, including article and journal metrics (total articles published per journal per year, breakdown of the Bradford's law distribution of journals, and Lotka's law, journal impact factors), author metrics (country of origin, collaborations), citation totals, and keyword counts. Results and Discussion: The highest number of published articles from all journals occurred in 2011, the lowest in 2016. World Neurosurgery published the most. The author collaboration index has declined since 2016 with a notable drop in 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic began. Impact factors remained stable, except for Operative Neurosurgery, which experienced a steep decline in 2020, and World Neurosurgery, which experienced a mild decline in 2020. Canadian authors were the most likely to participate in multi-country collaborations. Conclusion: The most articles were published in Journal of Neurosurgery, followed by Neurosurgery, Spine, and World Neurosurgery.

4.
Neurol Int ; 14(2): 391-405, 2022 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810056

ABSTRACT

Stroke is a fatal morbidity that needs emergency medical admission and immediate medical attention. COVID-19 ischemic brain damage is closely associated with common neurological symptoms, which are extremely difficult to treat medically, and risk factors. We performed literature research about COVID-19 and ischemia in PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus for this current narrative review. We discovered parallel manifestations of SARS-CoV-19 infection and brain ischemia risk factors. In published papers, we discovered a similar but complex pathophysiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection and stroke pathology. A patient with other systemic co-morbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, or any respiratory disease, has a fatal combination in intensive care management when infected with SARS-CoV-19. Furthermore, due to their shared risk factors, COVID-19 and stroke are a lethal combination for medical management to treat. In this review, we discuss shared pathophysiology, adjuvant risk factors, challenges, and advancements in stroke-associated COVID-19 therapeutics.

5.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 22: 100463, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1800191

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is an essential public health strategy to control the 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. While the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccines far outweigh the risks, side effects continue to be reported in the literature. We report a 65-year-old man who developed cognitive deficits and memory impairments following his first dose of Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine (Covishield). The onset of acute cognitive deficits and memory impairments could be another complication to COVID-19 vaccination that physicians and neurologists need to be warned to. Monitoring the safety of COVID-19 vaccines and describing side effects associated with them is essential to improve safety profiles and enhance public trust.

6.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, a multitude of surveys have analyzed the impact virus spreading on the everyday medical practice, including neurosurgery. However, none have examined the perceptions of neurosurgeons towards the pandemic, their life changes, and the strategies they implemented to be able to deal with their patients in such a difficult time. METHODS: From April 2021 to May 2021 a modified Delphi method was used to construct, pilot, and refine the questionnaire focused on the evolution of global neurosurgical practice during the pandemic. This survey was distributed among 1000 neurosurgeons; the responses were then collected and critically analyzed. RESULTS: Outpatient department practices changed with a rapid rise in teleservices. 63.9% of respondents reported that they have changed their OT practices to emergency cases with occasional elective cases. 40.0% of respondents and 47.9% of their family members reported to have suffered from COVID-19. 56.2% of the respondents reported having felt depressed in the last 1 year. 40.9% of respondents reported having faced financial difficulties. 80.6% of the respondents found online webinars to be a good source of learning. 47.8% of respondents tried to improve their neurosurgical knowledge while 31.6% spent the extra time in research activities. CONLCUSIONS: Progressive increase in operative waiting lists, preferential use of telemedicine, reduction in tendency to complete stoppage of physical clinic services and drop in the use of PPE kits were evident. Respondents' age had an impact on how the clinical services and operative practices have evolved. Financial concerns overshadow mental health.

7.
Minerva Med ; 112(5): 631-640, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535062

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There was significant surge in the academic publications after the onset of COVID-19 outbreak. The aim of this study was to scientometrically analyze all the medical publications on COVID-19 in 2020 as well as the top 100 cited articles. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We performed a search of the "Web of Science" database using the keywords "COVID," and "corona" on December 20, 2020. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Our search retrieved a total of 45,420 articles on the topic COVID-19 in the year 2020. Corresponding authors from 143 countries contributed to these articles. The highest number of articles were contributed by corresponding authors from the USA (N.=10299), whereas 50 articles in the top 100 cited articles had corresponding authors from China. Among the top 100 cited, the majority were published from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China (N.=37). New England Journal of Medicine had the maximum impact (h-index of 57), closely followed by Lancet (h-index=55). CONCLUSIONS: Scientific publications amount on COVID-19 disease grew at an astonishing pace during 2020. We caution the readers that this rapidity of publication could have missed out on the rigorous review process and the scientific basis of the methods followed.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors
9.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e645-e656, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Global use of telemedicine has increased rapidly during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to bridge the gap in existing health care services. Intercontinental trends in neurosurgeons' perception and practices of telemedicine have been sparingly reported. METHODS: We conducted an online anonymized and validated survey using a structured questionnaire to gain insight into neurosurgeons' experience with telemedicine across various continents and rated its usefulness on a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: We received 286 responses across 5 continents. There was a trend to support a major paradigm shift favoring teleconsultations during the COVID-19 pandemic in respondents from North America (P = 0.06). Signed prescriptions were e-mailed along with video-based teleconsultations preferentially in Europe and North America. In comparison, audio- or text-based teleconsultations along with unsigned prescriptions were prevalent in Asia and Africa (P = 0.0005). Acceptability and perceived usefulness for telemedicine during the pandemic were similar across the globe, regardless of neurosurgeons' experience (mean satisfaction score 3.72 ± 1.09; P = 0.62). A majority of neurosurgeons from Asia and South America complained of difficulties during teleconsultations owing to lack of appropriate infrastructure, internet connectivity/prescription-related issues, and potential risk of litigation (P = 0.0005). Approximately 46% of neurosurgeons, predominantly from Europe and North America, thought that telemedicine could play a vital role in clinical practice even after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides (mean satisfaction score 3.26 ± 1.16; P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine in neurosurgery is a viable alternative to physical outpatient services during the COVID-19 pandemic and could potentially play a vital role after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/trends , Ambulatory Care , Humans , Internet , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery/economics , Neurosurgery/methods , Prescriptions , Remote Consultation/economics , Remote Consultation/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
10.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641027

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
11.
World Neurosurg ; 142: e396-e406, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Significant resources have been dedicated to the disease. The pandemic in the Indian subcontinent, compared with the rest of the world, is relatively delayed. The neurosurgical practice cannot remain unaffected by hugely disruptive measures such as a lockdown. The inevitable increase in COVID infections with the gradual relaxation of lockdown continues to pose a risk for health care providers. Therefore, it is imperative to evaluate whether the pandemic has had a discernible effect on health care providers, especially in terms of practice modifications in private establishments and publicly funded hospitals, the emotional impact on the surgeon, and the influence of social media on the psyche of the surgeon. METHODS: An online questionnaire-based survey was prepared, with questions related to the COVID-specific themes of precautions taken in outpatient services and operating theaters, the influence of social media, the economic loss incurred, and the perceptible impact of telemedicine and webinars. The links to the survey were mailed to neurosurgeons in private and public practice countrywide. The responses were anonymized to ensure free and unbiased answers to the survey questions. RESULTS: A total of 176 responses were received from across the Indian subcontinent. The median age of respondents was 39 years (range, 32-70 years) and the postresidency experience was 7 years (range, 0-34 years). Respondents were an equitable mix of public and private practitioners. Of respondents, 46% were practicing restricted outpatient services, more in public institutions (P = 0.22) which also had a higher incidence of tele-outpatient services (26% vs. 17%). Wearing surgical masks, N95 masks, and gloves were the most commonly practiced precautionary measures in outpatient services (>60%). Although private practitioners were continuing elective cases (40%), public institutes were more cautious, with only emergency patients being operated on (29%). The greatest fear among all practitioners was passing the infection to their family (75%). Social media were helpful for brainstorming queries and updating practice modifications, but some surgeons admitted to receiving threats on social media platforms (37.5%). Depression and economic losses were palpable for approximately 30% neurosurgeons. CONCLUSIONS: The survey highlights the perception of neurosurgeons toward the pandemic and the difference in public-private practice. Suspension of elective procedures, severe curtailment of regular outpatient appointments, drastic modifications of the normal outpatient department/operating room practices, and apprehensions related to inadequacy of safety provided by personal protective equipment use and financial losses of private establishments were some of the visible themes in our survey results. Although telemedicine has not been as widely adopted as expected, online education has been favorably received.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Coronavirus Infections , Elective Surgical Procedures , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional Practice , Telemedicine , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Depression , Economics , Hospitals, Private , Hospitals, Public , Humans , India , Middle Aged , Neurosurgery , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
World Neurosurg ; 139: e818-e826, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324728

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has consistently changed medical practice throughout specialties, regardless of their contribution in facing the disease itself. We surveyed neurosurgeons worldwide to investigate the situation they are experiencing. METHODS: A 17-question, web-based survey was administered to neurosurgeons worldwide through the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Neurosurgery Cocktail from March 28 to April 5, 2020, by web link or e-mail invitation. Questions were divided into 3 subgroups: general information, health system organization, and institutional plans for the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Collected data were initially elaborated using SurveyMonkey software. Country-specific data were extracted from the World Health Organization website. Statistical analysis was performed using R, version 3.6.3. RESULTS: Of the 446 respondents, most were from Italy (20%), India (19%), and Pakistan (5%). Surgical activity was significantly reduced in most centers (79%) and dedicated in-hospital routes were created for patients with SARS-CoV-2 (58%). Patient screening was performed only when there were symptoms (57%) and not routinely before surgery (18%). The preferred methods included a nasopharyngeal swab and chest radiograph. Health professionals were rarely screened (20%) and sometimes, even if SARS-CoV-2 positive, were asked to work if asymptomatic (26%). Surgical planning was changed in most institutions (92%), whereas indications were modified for nonurgent procedures (59%) and remained unchanged for subarachnoid hemorrhages (85%). CONCLUSIONS: Most neurosurgeons worldwide reported work reorganization and practices that respond to current international guidelines. Differences in practice might be related to the perception of the pandemic and significant differences in the health systems. Sharing data and experiences will be of paramount importance to address the present moment and challenges in the near future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Global Health/standards , Neurosurgeons/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Global Health/trends , Humans , Neurosurgeons/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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