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1.
AIDS Behav ; 26(7): 2338-2348, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638039

ABSTRACT

This paper presents data from the Love and Sex in the Time of COVID survey, an online survey with US gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men. The first round of the Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May, 2020: the second round was collected November 2020 to January 2021. GBMSM were recruited through advertisements featured on social networking platforms. Analysis examines changes in self-reported measures of sexual behavior (number of sex partners, number of anal sex partners and number of anal sex partners not protected by pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or condoms) between those with complete data for round one and round two of the surveys (n = 280). While in round one, men reported a moderate willingness to have sex during COVID-19 (3.5 on a scale from 1 to 5), this had reduced significantly to 2.1 by round two. Men reported declines in the number of unprotected anal sex partners since pre-COVID. Perceptions of a longer time until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with increases in the number of sex partners and UAI partners. The results illustrate some significant declines in sexual behavior among GBMSM as the COVID-19 pandemic progressed. As vaccine programs continue to roll out across the U.S, as lockdowns ease and as we return to some normalcy, it will be important to continue to think critically about ways to re-engage men in HIV prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexual Behavior , Sexual and Gender Minorities , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unsafe Sex/statistics & numerical data
2.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0249740, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Central to measuring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV is understanding the role of loss of access to essential HIV prevention and care services created by clinic and community-based organization closures. In this paper, we use a comprehensive list of HIV prevention services in four corridors of the US heavily impacted by HIV, developed as part of a large RCT, to illustrate the potential impact of service closure on LGBTQ+ youth. METHODS: We identified and mapped LGBTQ+ friendly services offering at least one of the following HIV-related services: HIV testing; STI testing; PrEP/PEP; HIV treatment and care; and other HIV-related services in 109 counties across four major interstate corridors heavily affected by HIV US Census regions: Pacific (San Francisco, CA to San Diego, CA); South-Atlantic (Washington, DC to Atlanta, GA); East-North-Central (Chicago, IL to Detroit, MI); and East-South-Central (Memphis, TN to New Orleans, LA). RESULTS: There were a total of 831 LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers across the 109 counties. There was a range of LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV-service provider availability across counties (range: 0-14.33 per 10,000 youth aged 13-24 (IQR: 2.13), median: 1.09); 9 (8.26%) analyzed counties did not have any LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the correlation between county HIV prevalence and LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service provider density was 0.16 (p = 0.09), suggesting only a small, non-statistically significant linear relationship between a county's available LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers and their HIV burden. CONCLUSIONS: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, we must find novel, affordable ways to continue to provide sexual health, mental health and other support services to LGBTQ+ youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics , Sexual and Gender Minorities/education , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Prevalence , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
J Interpers Violence ; : 886260521997454, 2021 Mar 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119376

ABSTRACT

Stay at home orders-intended to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by limiting social contact-have forced people to remain in their homes. The additional stressors created by the need to stay home and socially isolate may act as triggers to intimate partner violence (IPV). In this article, we present data from a recent online cross-sectional survey with gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in the United States to illustrate changes in IPV risks that have occurred during the U.S. COVID-19 epidemic. The Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May 2020. GBMSM were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, recruiting a sample size of 696 GBMSM. Analysis considers changes in victimization and perpetration of IPV during the 3 months prior to the survey (March-May 2020) that represents the first 3 months of lockdown during the COVID-19 epidemic. During the period March-May 2020, 12.6% of participants reported experiencing any IPV with higher rates of emotional IPV (10.3%) than sexual (2.2%) or physical (1.8%) IPV. Of those who reported IPV victimization during lockdown, for almost half this was their first time experience: 5.3% reported the IPV they experienced happened for the first time during the past 3 months (0.8% physical, 2.13% sexual, and 3.3% emotional). Reporting of perpetration of IPV during lockdown was lower: only 6% reported perpetrating any IPV, with perpetration rates of 1.5% for physical, 0.5% for sexual, and 5.3% for emotional IPV. Of those who reported perpetration of IPV during lockdown, very small percentages reported that this was the first time they had perpetrated IPV: 0.9% for any IPV (0.2% physical, 0.2% sexual, and 0.6% emotional). The results illustrate an increased need for IPV resources for GBMSM during these times of increased stress and uncertainty, and the need to find models of resource and service delivery that can work inside of social distancing guidelines while protecting the confidentiality and safety of those who are experiencing IPV.

4.
Am J Mens Health ; 14(5): 1557988320957545, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772041

ABSTRACT

While there is evidence of variations in the risk perceptions of COVID-19 and that they are linked to both engagement in health-protective behaviors and poor mental health outcomes, there has been a lack of attention to how individuals perceive the risk of COVID-19 relative to other infectious diseases. This paper examines the relative perceptions of the severity of COVID-19 and HIV among a sample of U.S. gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSMs). The "Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19" survey was conducted online from April 2020 to May 2020. GBMSMs were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, resulting in a sample size of 696. The analysis considers differences in responses to two scales: the Perceived Severity of HIV Infection and the Perceived Severity of COVID-19 Infection. Participants perceived greater seriousness for HIV infection (mean 46.67, range 17-65) than for COVID-19 infection (mean 38.81, range 13-62). Some items reflecting more proximal impacts of infection (anxiety, loss of sleep, and impact on employment) were similar for HIV and COVID-19. Those aged over 25 and those who perceived higher prevalence of COVID-19 in the United States or their state were more likely to report COVID-19 as more severe than HIV. There is a need to develop nuanced public health messages for GBMSMs that convey the ongoing simultaneous health threats of both HIV and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk-Taking , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Bisexuality/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Sexual Behavior , Survival Analysis , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
AIDS Behav ; 25(1): 40-48, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739667

ABSTRACT

This paper presents data from a recent cross-sectional survey of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in the US, to understand changes in sexual behavior and access to HIV prevention options (i.e. condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)) during the COVID-19 lockdown period. The Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May, 2020. GBMSM were recruited through advertisements featured on social networking platforms, recruiting a sample size of 518 GBMSM. Analysis considers changes three in self-reported measures of sexual behavior: number of sex partners, number of anal sex partners and number of anal sex partners not protected by pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or condoms. Approximately two-thirds of the sample reported that they believed it was possible to contract COVID-19 through sex, with anal sex reported as the least risky sex act. Men did not generally feel it was important to reduce their number of sex partners during COVID-19, but reported a moderate willingness to have sex during COVID-19. For the period between February and April-May 20,202, participants reported a mean increase of 2.3 sex partners during COVID-19, a mean increase of 2.1 anal sex partners (range - 40 to 70), but a very small increase in the number of unprotected anal sex partners. Increases in sexual behavior during COVID-19 were associated with increases in substance use during the same period. High levels of sexual activity continue to be reported during the COVID-19 lockdown period and these high levels of sexual activity are often paralleled by increases in substance use and binge drinking. There is a clear need to continue to provide comprehensive HIV prevention and care services during COVID-19, and telehealth and other eHealth platforms provide a safe, flexible mechanism for providing services.


Subject(s)
Bisexuality/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Condoms/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Partners , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Unsafe Sex/psychology , Unsafe Sex/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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