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1.
Surg Infect (Larchmt) ; 23(5): 458-464, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901048

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the rate of primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA) peri-prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and superficial surgical site infections (SSI) is currently unknown. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate any changes in the rates of 90-day PJI or 30-day SSI, including trends in microbiology of the infections, during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the three years prior. Patients and Methods: An Institutional Review Board-approved, multicenter, retrospective study was conducted with five participating academic institutions across two healthcare systems in the northeastern United States. Primary TJA patients from the years 2017-2019 were grouped as a pre-COVID-19 pandemic cohort and patients from the year 2020 were grouped as a COVID-19 pandemic cohort. Differences in patient demographics, PJI, SSI, and microbiology between the two cohorts were assessed. Results: A total of 14,844 TJAs in the pre-COVID-19 pandemic cohort and 5,453 TJAs in the COVID-19 pandemic cohort were evaluated. There were no substantial differences of the combined 90-day PJI and 30-day superficial SSI rates between the pre-COVID-19 pandemic cohort (0.35%) compared with the COVID-19 pandemic cohort (0.26%; p = 0.303). Conclusions: This study did not find any change in the rates of 90-day PJI or 30-day superficial SSI in patients undergoing primary TJA between a pre-COVID-19 pandemic and COVID-19 pandemic cohort. Larger national database studies may identify small but substantial differences in 90-day PJI and 30-day superficial SSI rates between these two time periods. Our data may support continued efforts to maintain high compliance with hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment, and limited hospital visitation whenever possible.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Infectious , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Prosthesis-Related Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prosthesis-Related Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology
2.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(8S): S814-S818.e2, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although telemedicine visits were essential and adopted by providers and patients alike, few studies have been conducted evaluating orthopedic patient perception of the care delivered during these visits. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated specific factors that affected patient satisfaction with telemedicine and the receptiveness to continue virtual visits post COVID-19 in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) patients. Thus, the purposes of our study are to determine the following: (1) patient satisfaction with using TJA telemedicine services, (2) whether patient characteristics might be associated with satisfaction, and (3) whether virtual clinic visits may be used post-COVID-19. METHODS: A prospective, cross-sectional survey study was completed by 126 TJA patients who participated in telemedicine visits with TJA surgeons from May 1, 2020 to August 31, 2020. The survey consisted of questions regarding demographics, satisfaction, and telemedicine experiences. RESULTS: One hundred one (80.2%) patients were satisfied with their telemedicine visit, with patients <80 years old (P = .008) and those with a longer commute time (P = .01) being more satisfied P = .01. There was a significant preference for in-person visits when meeting arthroplasty surgeons for the first time (P < .001), but patients were equally amenable to follow-up telemedicine visits once there was an established relationship with the surgeon. CONCLUSION: Younger patients, patients with longer commute distances, and patients who had established relationships with their provider expressed higher satisfaction with telemedicine arthroplasty visits. Although >80% of patients were satisfied with their telemedicine visit, an established patient-provider relationship may be integral to the success of an arthroplasty telemedicine practice.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies
3.
Sci Immunol ; 7(68): eabf2846, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685480

ABSTRACT

Macrophages regulate protective immune responses to infectious microbes, but aberrant macrophage activation frequently drives pathological inflammation. To identify regulators of vigorous macrophage activation, we analyzed RNA-seq data from synovial macrophages and identified SLAMF7 as a receptor associated with a superactivated macrophage state in rheumatoid arthritis. We implicated IFN-γ as a key regulator of SLAMF7 expression and engaging SLAMF7 drove a strong wave of inflammatory cytokine expression. Induction of TNF-α after SLAMF7 engagement amplified inflammation through an autocrine signaling loop. We observed SLAMF7-induced gene programs not only in macrophages from rheumatoid arthritis patients but also in gut macrophages from patients with active Crohn's disease and in lung macrophages from patients with severe COVID-19. This suggests a central role for SLAMF7 in macrophage superactivation with broad implications in human disease pathology.


Subject(s)
Inflammation/immunology , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family/immunology , Transcriptome/immunology , Acute Disease , Adult , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/genetics , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chronic Disease , Crohn Disease/genetics , Crohn Disease/immunology , Crohn Disease/metabolism , Female , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/metabolism , Macrophage Activation/genetics , RNA-Seq/methods , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family/genetics , Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Synovial Membrane/immunology , Synovial Membrane/metabolism , Synovial Membrane/pathology , Transcriptome/genetics
4.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(8): 1426-1430.e3, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A survey was conducted at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) to evaluate current practice management strategies among AAHKS members. METHODS: An application was used by AAHKS members to answer both multiple-choice and yes or no questions. Specific questions were asked regarding the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on practice patterns. RESULTS: There was a dramatic acceleration in same day total joint arthroplasty with 85% of AAHKS members performing same day total joint arthroplasty. More AAHKS members remain in private practice (46%) than other practice types, whereas fee for service (34%) and relative value units (26%) are the major form of compensation. At the present time, 93% of practices are experiencing staffing shortages, and these shortages are having an impact on surgical volume. CONCLUSION: This survey elucidates the current practice patterns of AAHKS members. The pandemic has had a significant impact on some aspects of practice activity. Future surveys need to monitor changes in practice patterns over time.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Practice Management , Surgeons , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , United States
5.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 47(1): 27-33, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570112

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Survey-based study. OBJECTIVE: We performed a mixed methods study involving patients using telemedicine for spine care. We sought to understand factors influencing the utilization and evaluation of this modality. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Telemedicine has been integrated into routine spine care; its long-term viability will depend not only on optimizing its safety, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness, but also on understanding patient valuation of its benefits and limitations. METHODS: We used a clinical registry to identify spine patients seen virtually by providers at our tertiary academic medical center between March and September of 2020. We distributed an online survey that queried patients' experiences with telemedicine. We performed statistical analyses of Likert-scale questions and a thematic analysis of free-form responses. Sociodemographic data were abstracted and analyzed. RESULTS: Overall, we evaluated 139 patient surveys. High levels of patient-rated care and patient-rated experience were observed for both in-person and telemedicine visits; however, in-person visits were rated significantly higher in both respects (9.3/10 vs. 8.7/10 for patient-rated care, P < 0.001; 9.0/10 vs. 8.4/10 for patient-rated experience, P = 0.006). A preference for in-person first-time visits was observed which was not maintained for follow up appointments. Both patient and clinical factors influenced perceptions of telemedicine. Thematic analysis of free-form responses provided by 113 patients (81%) generated favorable, unfavorable, and reflective themes, each further contextualized by subthemes. Responders were not significantly different from nonresponders across sociodemographic characteristics. CONCLUSION: Our quantitative and qualitative findings yield insight into the patient experience of telemedicine in spine care. A preference for in-person visits was notable, particularly for new patient evaluations. This preference was not maintained for follow-up care. Patients acknowledged the benefits of telemedicine and reflected on its effective integration with in-person care. These results may guide best practices to improve access and patient satisfaction in the future.Level of Evidence: 4.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Patient Outcome Assessment , Patient Satisfaction , Spine
6.
Knee ; 32: 97-102, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469890

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Postoperative radiographs are commonly ordered after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA), however, there is limited data on how often these films change management over the entire postoperative time course, and what should prompt imaging to maximize clinical utility. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients ≥ 18 years old who underwent a primary TKA at two level one trauma centers. Postoperative data were collected to determine the frequency of postoperative radiograph series, radiograph findings that did not suggest normal healing or alignment to radiologist and orthopedists, and changes in postoperative management. The total cost and radiation exposure values were calculated for all patient radiographs using estimates from previous literature. RESULTS: From the 1258 patients included, 3831 postoperative radiographs were taken (mean ± 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.05 ± 0.11 radiographs per patient). Of these 3831 radiographs, 44 (1.1%) contained a positive radiographic finding. Only 13 (0.3% of radiographs) of these positive radiographic findings were positive orthopaedic findings, 11 of which led to changes in management. For all but 1 of these patients (10/11, 91%), these radiographs were taken during a non-routine postoperative visit. Routine postoperative radiographs that did not change management cost $1,008,480 and administered 22.92 mSV of radiation to patients within this study. CONCLUSION: Postoperative radiography obtained after primary TKA were of low clinical utility yet resulted in considerable healthcare costs and unnecessary radiation burden. Radiographs ordered during a non-routine visit, however, were a reliable indicator of when this imaging provided clinical utility.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Adolescent , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Postoperative Period , Radiography , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
7.
The Spine Journal ; 21(9, Supplement):S34-S35, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1351836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND CONTEXT Telemedicine was widely adopted to maintain a functioning health care system at the start of the COVID-19 global pandemic. The long-term viability of telemedicine will depend not only on its safety, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness from the physician and health system point of view, but also on patient perception of its benefits and limitations, as well as their willingness to continue using it as in-person visit restrictions are eased. PURPOSE The aims of this study were two-fold: 1. To characterize patient preference for telemedicine vs in-person evaluation and 2. To identify factors affecting telemedicine valuation through both quantitative and qualitative means. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING Survey-based study. PATIENT SAMPLE Using our institution's clinical registry and electronic health records, we identified both audiovisual and audio-only patient telemedicine encounters conducted within the Division of Spine Surgery in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery between March 20, 2020 and September 1, 2020. OUTCOME MEASURES Survey responders were compared to nonresponders across key sociodemographic data. Categorical, Likert-scale, and free-form responses aimed at delineating and understanding specific influencers of patient use of and experience with telemedicine were analyzed. METHODS Between March 20, 2020 and September 1, 2020, patients who sought spine care via an audiovisual or audio-only telemedicine encounter were identified. Using a secure patient communication portal or telephone, patients were contacted and asked to participate in a survey-based study. Question format included categorical, Likert scale-based, and free-form response items. Bivariate analyses and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated. For all analyses, p<0.05 was significant. RESULTS Of 457 patients, 139 (30%) completed the survey;responders were not significantly different from nonresponders across sociodemographic characteristics including age, gender, race, and insurance type (p>0.05 for all comparisons). Average age of the responders was 61.8 years (Standard Error = 1.2). Most patients had more than one telemedicine experience prior to completing the survey (n = 98 [70.5%]). Average travel time saved was 107.6 minutes (Standard Deviation = 81.3), and the average rating of difficulty with telemedicine technology was 2.9 out of 10 (SD = 2.7), with 1 signifying very easy and 10 signifying very challenging. High levels of patient-rated care and experience were seen across in-person and telemedicine visits;however, in-person visits were rated significantly higher in both respects (9.3 out of 10 vs 8.7 out of 10 for patient-rated care [p<0.05] and 9.0 out of 10 vs 8.4 out of 10 for patient-rated experience [p<0.05]). A preference for in-person first-time visits was found, which was not maintained for follow-up appointments. Lower patient age and less difficulty with technology significantly correlated with higher levels of patient satisfaction (p<0.05). Qualitative analysis of free-form responses provided by 113 patients (81%) uncovered several positive, negative, and neutral themes with respect to patient experiences with telemedicine. CONCLUSIONS While high levels of care and highly rated patient experience can be achieved through both virtual and in-person care, in-person care was significantly better in these respects. Furthermore, patients had a strong preference for in-person first-time visits, which was not maintained for follow-up visits. These ratings and preferences were evident despite overall little difficulty with telemedicine technology and significant travel time saved. Free-form responses supported and further contextualized these findings. Thus, while telemedicine may continue to be an important component of spine care moving forward, patients are ready to see and be seen by their physicians again. FDA DEVICE/DRUG STATUS This abstract does not discuss or include any applicable devices or drugs.

9.
J Arthroplasty ; 36(7S): S395-S399, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic caused an abrupt disruption in residency and fellowship training, with most in-person teaching ceasing in March 2020. The AAHKS (American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons) Board of Directors quickly initiated an online lecture series named the Fellows Online COVID-19 AAHKS Learning initiative. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the impact that this educational platform had on residents and adult hip and knee reconstruction fellows. METHODS: Between March 31, 2020 and June 25, 2020 an online educational platform was simultaneously developed and delivered. Adult hip and knee reconstruction fellows and residents were invited to participate in the free, live, online education sessions. Faculty from well-respected institutions from around the United States volunteered their time to host the initiative, choosing topics to present, ranging from hip (13 lectures) and knee (9 lectures), to practice management/miscellaneous (12 lectures). Attendee registrations were tracked via the online platform and the maximum number of attendees per session was recorded. A survey was administered to attendees for feedback. RESULTS: Thirty-four, 1-hour virtual lectures were delivered in real time by 79 different faculty members from 20 different institutions. A total of 4746 registrations for the 34 lectures were received, with 2768 registrants (58.3%) attending. The average attendance was 81 viewers per session (range 21-143), with attendance peaking mid-April 2020. A survey administered to lecture participants showed that 104/109 (95.4%) attended live lectures and 93/109 (85.3%) watched recorded sessions. About 92.5% of attendees responded that they wanted the lectures to continue after clinical responsibilities resumed. CONCLUSION: Amid a pandemic with cessation of in-person training, AAHKS delivered a robust virtual training alternative, exposing residents and fellows to a variety of renowned faculty and topics. Attendance with the program was very high, along with continued interest to continue this initiative. These worldwide lectures may lead to future opportunities in virtual residency and fellowship education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Adult , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
10.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 103(1): 4-9, 2021 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953793

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is widely regarded as one of the most important global public health challenges of the twenty-first century. The overuse and the improper use of antibiotics in human medicine, food production, and the environment as a whole have unfortunately contributed to this issue. Many major international scientific, political, and social organizations have warned that the increase in AMR could cost the lives of millions of people if it is not addressed on a global scale. Although AMR is already a challenge in clinical practice today, it has taken on a new importance in the face of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. While improved handwashing techniques, social distancing, and other interventional measures may positively influence AMR, the widespread use of antibiotics to treat or prevent bacterial coinfections, especially in unconfirmed cases of COVID-19, may have unintended negative implications with respect to AMR. Although the exact number of bacterial coinfections and the rate at which patients with COVID-19 receive antibiotic therapy remain to be accurately determined, the pandemic has revived the discussion on antibiotic overuse and AMR. This article describes why the COVID-19 pandemic has increased our awareness of AMR and presents the immense global impact of AMR on society as a whole. Furthermore, an attempt is made to stress the importance of tackling AMR in the future and the role of the orthopaedic community in this worldwide effort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Global Health , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
11.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(9): 2747-2755, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716275

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To plan for the continuance of elective hip and knee arthroplasty during a resurgence or new wave of COVID-19 infections. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted using the terms "COVID-19" or "SARS-Cov-2" and "second wave". No relevant citations were found to inform on recommendations the plan. Therefore, an expert panel of the European Hip Society and the European Knee Associates was formed to provide the recommendations. RESULTS: Overall, the recommendations consider three phases; review of the first wave, preparation for the next wave, and during the next wave. International and national policies will drive most of the management. The recommendations focus on the preparation phase and, in particular, the actions that the individual surgeon needs to undertake to continue with, and practice, elective arthroplasty during the next wave, as well as planning their personal and their family's lives. The recommendations expect rigorous data collection during the next wave, so that a cycle of continuous improvement is created to take account of any future waves. CONCLUSIONS: The recommendations for planning to continue elective hip and knee arthroplasty during a new phase of the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic provide a framework to reduce the risk of a complete shutdown of elective surgery. This involves engaging with hospital managers and other specialities in the planning process. Individuals have responsibilities to themselves, their colleagues, and their families, beyond the actual delivery of elective arthroplasty.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Europe , Humans , Orthopedics , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surgeons
12.
JBJS Case Connect ; 10(3): e2000226, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646996

ABSTRACT

CASE: We report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with a late onset of acute periprosthetic joint infection after total knee arthroplasty and a positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 polymerase chain reaction test. We describe our perioperative protocol and challenges for ensuring the safety of healthcare providers while operating on a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-positive patient. CONCLUSIONS: Given the incredible spread of COVID-19 globally, hospitals should anticipate perioperative protocols for the surgical management of COVID-19-positive patients with concurrent pathology to ensure safety to healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Infectious/surgery , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Prosthesis-Related Infections/surgery , Arthritis, Infectious/complications , COVID-19 , Humans , Knee Prosthesis/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Prosthesis-Related Infections/complications , SARS-CoV-2
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