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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 788384, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775993

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the eye-related quality of life (ER-QOL), functional vision, and their determinants in children following congenital and developmental cataract surgery, as the impact on their families, using the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire (PedEyeQ). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 107 children (aged 0-11 years) with congenital and developmental cataracts who had undergone surgery, as well as 59 visually healthy controls (aged 0-11 years). One parent for each child completed either the Proxy 0-4 PedEyeQ, the Proxy 5-11 PedEyeQ, or the Parent PedEyeQ, depending on their child's age. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were then conducted to compare the differences between groups and to analyze their determinants. Results: PedEyeQ scores were found to be lower in postoperative children with congenital and developmental cataracts compared with the control group across all study domains. The PedEyeQ Proxy 0 to 4 years' greatest mean difference was 27 points worse in the Functional Vision domain (95% CI -34 to -19; p < 0.001). We also found that the occurrence of nystagmus (p < 0.005) and strabismus (p < 0.005) were the major factors affecting participants' functional vision. The PedEyeQ Proxy 5 to 11 years' greatest mean difference was 23 points worse in this same domain (95% CI -30 to -15; p < 0.001), with nystagmus (p < 0.05) being the main determinant herein. Parent PedEyeQ 0 to 4 years' greatest difference was 46 points worse on the Worry about their Child's Eye Condition domain (95% CI -57 to -36; p < 0.001). Similarly, parents of children with ophthalmologic abnormalities, including nystagmus (p < 0.001) and strabismus (p < 0.05), were significantly more worried about their children's eye condition. Parent PedEyeQ 5 to 11 years' greatest difference was also found to be 30 points worse on the Worry about their Child's Eye Condition domain (95% CI -43 to -17; p < 0.005). Conclusions: Children who have undergone congenital and developmental cataract surgery experience a lower quality of life and reduced functional vision. Their families are also significantly and adversely affected herein. Thus, more attention is needed on these groups, with more focused measures being administered to both children and their families.


Subject(s)
Cataract Extraction , Cataract , Cataract/congenital , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Frontiers in medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1652060

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has swept the world and led to delays in the treatment of Crohn's disease patients treated with biologics. This study aims to investigate the risk factors for delayed treatment during the epidemic and to observe the short- and long-term influences of such delays among them to provide some reference on treatments. Methods: This study retrospectively enrolled patients diagnosed with Crohn's disease who received infliximab treatment between January 23, 2020 and April 30, 2020. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to analyze the risk factors for delayed treatment. Propensity score matching was utilized to compare the effects of delayed treatment on the short- and long-term outcomes. Result: Our cohort identified a total of 53 patients with a delay rate of 71.7%. Of these patients, 38 were in the delayed group, and 15 were in the non-delayed group. Logistic regression analysis showed that the baseline levels of C-reactive protein were an influence factor for delaying treatment (OR = 0.967, 95% CI = 0.935–1.000, p = 0.047). Regarding short-term effects, the delayed group had a lower decrease in the Crohn's Disease Activity Index than the non-delayed group [−43.3 (−92.7, −9.7) vs. −17.3 (−29.0, 79.9), p = 0.038] and significantly higher long-term readmission rates (33.3% vs. 0%, p = 0.014). Conclusion: Delayed infliximab treatment could affect the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease. Our study suggested that the regulated course of treatment with biological agents should be performed effectively and that education should be enhanced to minimize delays in treatment.

3.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 21(1): 228, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome novel coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly worldwide. SARS-CoV-2 has been found to cause multiple organ damage; however, little attention has been paid to the damage to the endocrine system caused by this virus, and the subsequent impact on prognosis. This may be the first research on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and prognosis in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: In this retrospective observational study, 235 patients were admitted to the hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from 22 January to 17 March 2020. Clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, and treatments were obtained from electronic medical records with standard data collection forms and compared among patients with different thyroid function status. RESULTS: Among 235 patients, 17 (7.23%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, 11 (4.68%) severe non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), and 23 (9.79%) mild to moderate NTIS. Composite endpoint events of each group, including mortality, admission to the ICU, and using IMV were observed. Compared with normal thyroid function, the hazard ratios (HRs) of composite endpoint events for mild to moderate NTIS, severe NTIS, subclinical hypothyroidism were 27.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.07-105.7), 23.1 (95% CI 5.75-92.8), and 4.04 (95% CI 0.69-23.8) respectively. The multivariate-adjusted HRs for acute cardiac injury among patients with NTF, subclinical hypothyroidism, severe NTIS, and mild to moderate NTIS were 1.00, 1.68 (95% CI 0.56-5.05), 4.68 (95% CI 1.76-12.4), and 2.63 (95% CI 1.09-6.36) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that the suppression of the HPT axis could be a common complication in COVID-19 patients and an indicator of the severity of prognosis. Among the three different types of thyroid dysfunction with COVID-19, mild to moderate NTIS and severe NTIS have a higher risk of severe outcomes compared with subclinical hypothyroidism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/etiology , Hypertension/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
4.
Precis Radiat Oncol ; 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508932

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) broke out in Wuhan, China. The pandemic has posed a great challenge to radiation oncology departments, as interruptions in radiation therapy (RT) increase the risks of cancer recurrence or failure of the therapy as a whole. This study aimed to elucidate the impact of COVID-19 on radiation therapy staff in China. METHODS: As many working staff at different radiation oncology departments in China as possible were retrospectively enrolled from 23 January to 9 March 2020. They were then invited to answer a questionnaire, for essential data collection, from which their basic information, anxiety level, and workload were analyzed. RESULTS: Seven (0.39%) of the 1 755 radiation therapy staff who answered the questionnaire had contracted COVID-19, all of whom were from Wuhan. The factors influencing susceptibility were not sex (P  =  1.000), age (P  =  0.480), or comorbidities (P  =  0.600), but geographic location (P < 0.001) and whether the respondent worked in a designated COVID-19 hospital (P  =  0.003). In terms of protection procedures, four participants carried out basic, one second-level and two third-level protection procedures. The difference was not statistically significant (P  =  0.720). The infected respondents' anxiety level related to the outbreak (average score 6.57) was higher than that of their counterparts in Wuhan (5.18), as well as across the country (4.79), and 71.43% of those infected expressed the need for psychological interventions. During the epidemic, departments of 428 respondents (24.39%) shut down, while 76.71% of the respondents reported workload reduction. CONCLUSION: The factors related to COVID-19 infection were the geographic location and whether the respondent worked in a designated COVID-19 hospital. The infected respondents experienced greater psychological pressure than their uninfected counterparts and, therefore, required more psychological interventions.

5.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 727419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444039

ABSTRACT

Background: Blood parameters, such as neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, have been identified as reliable inflammatory markers with diagnostic and predictive value for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, novel hematological parameters derived from high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) have rarely been studied as indicators for the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of these novel biomarkers in COVID-19 patients and the diabetes subgroup. Methods: We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study involving all hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from January to March 2020 in five hospitals in Wuhan, China. Demographics, clinical and laboratory findings, and outcomes were recorded. Neutrophil to HDL-C ratio (NHR), monocyte to HDL-C ratio (MHR), lymphocyte to HDL-C ratio (LHR), and platelet to HDL-C ratio (PHR) were investigated and compared in both the overall population and the subgroup with diabetes. The associations between blood parameters at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to the intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the utility of different blood parameters. Results: Of 440 patients with COVID-19, 67 (15.2%) were critically ill. On admission, HDL-C concentration was decreased while NHR was high in patients with critical compared with non-critical COVID-19, and were independently associated with poor outcome as continuous variables in the overall population (HR: 0.213, 95% CI 0.090-0.507; HR: 1.066, 95% CI 1.030-1.103, respectively) after adjusting for confounding factors. Additionally, when HDL-C and NHR were examined as categorical variables, the HRs and 95% CIs for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1 were 0.280 (0.128-0.612) and 4.458 (1.817-10.938), respectively. Similar results were observed in the diabetes subgroup. ROC curves showed that the NHR had good performance in predicting worse outcomes. The cutoff point of the NHR was 5.50. However, the data in our present study could not confirm the possible predictive effect of LHR, MHR, and PHR on COVID-19 severity. Conclusion: Lower HDL-C concentrations and higher NHR at admission were observed in patients with critical COVID-19 than in those with noncritical COVID-19, and were significantly associated with a poor prognosis in COVID-19 patients as well as in the diabetes subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , China , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Leukocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 5536360, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378085

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of red blood cell distribution width (RDW) in patients with connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 213 CTD-ILD patients and 97 CTD patients without ILD from February 2017 to February 2020. Hospital and office records were used as data sources. CTD-ILD patients were followed up. RESULTS: Patients with CTD-ILD had significantly higher RDW than those with CTD without ILD (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of RDW for discriminating CTD-ILD from CTD without ILD was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.57-0.70, p < 0.001). The cutoff value of RDW for discriminating CTD-ILD from CTD without ILD was 13.95% with their corresponding specificity (55.9%) and sensitivity (70.1%). Correlation analyses showed that the increased RDW was significantly correlated with decreased DLCO%predicted (r = -0.211, p = 0.002). Cox multiple regression analysis indicated that RDW (HR = 1.495, p < 0.001) was an independent factor in the survival of CTD-ILD. The best cutoff value of RDW to predict the survival of patients with CTD-ILD was 14.05% (AUC = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.72-0.84, p < 0.001). The log-rank test showed a significant difference in survival between the two groups (RDW > 14.05% and RDW < 14.05%). CONCLUSION: RDW was higher in CTD-ILD patients and had a negative correlation with DLCO%predicted. RDW may be an important serum biomarker for severity and prognosis of patients with CTD-ILD.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Connective Tissue Diseases/complications , Erythrocyte Indices , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/blood , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
7.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e144, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279761

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic is spreading globally. Studies revealed that obesity may affect the progression and prognosis of COVID-19 patients. The aim of the meta-analysis is to identify the prevalence and impact of obesity on COVID-19. Studies on obese COVID-19 patients were obtained by searching PubMed, Cochrane Library databases and Web of Science databases, up to date to 5 June 2020. And the prevalence rate and the odds ratio (OR) of obesity with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as comprehensive indicators for analysis using a random-effects model. A total of 6081 patients in 11 studies were included. The prevalence of obesity in patients with COVID-19 was 30% (95% CI 21-39%). Obese patients were 1.79 times more likely to develop severe COVID-19 than non-obese patients (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.52-2.11, P < 0.0001, I2 = 0%). However obesity was not associated with death in COVID-19 patients (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.65-1.71, P = 0.84, I2 = 66.6%). In dose-response analysis, it was estimated that COVID-19 patients had a 16% increased risk of invasive mechanical ventilation (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.10-1.23, P < 0.0001) and a 20% increased risk of admission to ICU (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.11-1.30, P < 0.0001) per 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI. In conclusion, obesity in COVID-19 patients is associated with severity, but not mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Obesity/complications , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
8.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 35(7): e23811, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252001

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the clinical manifestation, imaging examination, and serology of patients with novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) between China and overseas. METHODS: Ninety patients with COVID-19 who admitted to Fuzhou Pulmonary Hospital from January 23, 2020, to May 1, 2020, were included in this retrospective study. They were divided into domestic group and overseas group according to the origin regions. The clinical manifestations, imaging examination, serology, treatment, and prognosis between the two groups were compared and analyzed. RESULTS: The clinical manifestations of patients in the two groups mainly included fever (83.1% and 47.4%), cough (62% and 31.6%), expectoration (47.9% and 31.6%), anorexia (28.2% and 47.4%), fatigue (21.1% and 10.5%), and dyspnea (22.5% and 0%). The main laboratory characteristics in the two groups were decreased lymphocyte count, increased lactate dehydrogenase, decreased oxygenation index, decreased white blood cell count, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and increased C-reactive protein. The computed tomography (CT) examinations of chest showed bilateral and peripheral involvement, with multiple patch shadows and ground glass shadows. However, pleural effusions were rare. CONCLUSION: Fever, cough, and dyspnea are more common in domestic cases than overseas cases. However, patients with COVID-19 from overseas may have the symptoms of loss of taste and smell that domestic cases do not have.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Pneumonia/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Prognosis , Young Adult
9.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 571037, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868936

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes has been found to increase severity and mortality under the current pandemic of coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19). Up to date, the clinical characteristics of diabetes patients with COVID-19 and the risk factors for poor clinical outcomes are not clearly understood. Methods: The study was retrospectively carried out on enrolled diabetes patients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection from a designated medical center for COVID-19 from January 25th, 2020 to February 14th, 2020 in Wuhan, China. The medical record was collected and reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the risk factors associated with the severe events which were defined as a composite endpoint of admission to intensive care unit, the use of mechanical ventilation, or death. Results: A total of 52 diabetes patients with COVID-19 were finally included in the study. 21 (40.4%) patients had developed severe events in 27.50 (IQR 12.25-35.75) days follow-up, 15 (28.8%) patients experienced life-threatening complications and 8 patients died with a recorded mortality rate of 15.4%. Only 13 patients (41.9%) were in optimal glycemic control with HbA1c value of <7.0%. In addition to general clinical characteristics of COVID-19, the severe events diabetes patients showed higher counts of white blood cells and neutrophil, lower lymphocytes (40, 76.9%), high levels of hs-CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and procalcitonin (PCT) as compared to the non-severe diabetes patients. Mild higher level of cardiac troponin I (cTNI) (32.0 pg/ml; IQR 16.80-55.00) and D-dimer (1.70 µg/L, IQR 0.70-2.40) were found in diabetes patients with severe events as compared to the non-severe patients (cTNI:20.00 pg/ml, IQR5.38-30.00, p = 0.019; D-dimer: 0.70 µg/L, IQR 0.30-2.40, p = 0.037). After adjusting age and sex, increased level of cTNI was found to significantly associate with the incidence of severe events (HR: 1.007; 95% CI: 1.000-1.013; p = 0.048), Furthermore, using of α-glucosidase inhibitors was found to be the potential protectant for severe events (HR: 0.227; 95% CI: 0.057-0.904; p = 0.035). Conclusion: Diabetes patients with COVID-19 showed poor clinical outcomes. Vigorous monitoring of cTNI should be recommended for the diabetes patients with COVID-19. Usage of α-glucosidase inhibitors could be a potential protectant for the diabetes patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
11.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1856

ABSTRACT

Background: From December 2019, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) broke out in

12.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 525, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690147

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes correlates with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19, but very few studies have evaluated whether impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is also a risk factor for the poor outcomes of patients with COVID-19. Here we aimed to examine the associations between IFG and diabetes at admission with risks of complications and mortality among patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 312 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from 5 hospitals in Wuhan from Jan 1 to Mar 17, 2020. Clinical information, laboratory findings, complications, treatment regimens, and mortality status were collected. The associations between hyperglycemia and diabetes status at admission with primary composite end-point events (including mechanical ventilation, admission to intensive care unit, or death) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: The median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range 38-66), and 172 (55%) were women. At the time of hospital admission, 84 (27%) had diabetes (and 36 were new-diagnosed), 62 (20%) had IFG, and 166 (53%) had normal fasting glucose (NFG) levels. Compared to patients with NFG, patients with IFG and diabetes developed more primary composite end-point events (9 [5%], 11 [18%], 26 [31%]), including receiving mechanical ventilation (5 [3%], 6 [10%], 21 [25%]), and death (4 [2%], 9 [15%], 20 [24%]). Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed diabetes was associated increased risks of primary composite end-point events (hazard ratio 3.53; 95% confidence interval 1.48-8.40) and mortality (6.25; 1.91-20.45), and IFG was associated with an increased risk of mortality (4.11; 1.15-14.74), after adjusting for age, sex, hospitals and comorbidities. Conclusion: IFG and diabetes at admission were associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Glucose Intolerance/complications , Hyperglycemia/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Fasting , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glucose Intolerance/virology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
13.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 22(10): 1897-1906, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436533

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate the association between different degrees of hyperglycaemia and the risk of all-cause mortality among hospitalized patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective study conducted from 22 January to 17 March 2020, 453 patients were admitted to Union Hospital in Wuhan, China, with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. Patients were classified into four categories: normal glucose, hyperglycaemia (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/L and/or HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%), newly diagnosed diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/L and/or HbA1c ≥6.5%) and known diabetes. The major outcomes included in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). RESULTS: Patients with newly diagnosed diabetes constituted the highest percentage to be admitted to the ICU (11.7%) and require IMV (11.7%), followed by patients with known diabetes (4.1%; 9.2%) and patients with hyperglycaemia (6.2%; 4.7%), compared with patients with normal glucose (1.5%; 2.3%), respectively. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of mortality among COVID-19 patients with normal glucose, hyperglycaemia, newly diagnosed diabetes and known diabetes were 1.00, 3.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65-16.6), 9.42 (95% CI 2.18-40.7) and 4.63 (95% CI 1.02-21.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: We showed that COVID-19 patients with newly diagnosed diabetes had the highest risk of all-cause mortality compared with COVID-19 patients with known diabetes, hyperglycaemia and normal glucose. Patients with COVID-19 need to be kept under surveillance for blood glucose screening.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Diseases/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Aged , Asymptomatic Diseases/therapy , Blood Glucose/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
14.
Int J Infect Dis ; 97: 245-250, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436529

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global public health emergency. METHODS: 204 elderly patients (≥60 years old) diagnosed with COVID-19 in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from January 31st to February 20th, 2020 were included in this study. Clinical endpoint was in-hospital death. RESULTS: Of the 204 patients, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were the most common coexisting conditions. 76 patients died in the hospital. Multivariate analysis showed that dyspnea (hazards ratio (HR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.414-3.517; p < 0.001), older age (HR 1.1, 95% CI 1.070-1.123; p < 0.001), neutrophilia (HR 4.4, 95% CI 1.310-15.061; p = 0.017) and elevated ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I (HR 3.9, 95% CI 1.471-10.433; p = 0.006) were independently associated with death. CONCLUSION: Although so far the overall mortality of COVID-19 is relatively low, the mortality of elderly patients is much higher. Early diagnosis and supportive care are of great importance for the elderly patients of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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