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1.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
2.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 2021 Jul 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293031

ABSTRACT

In an era of rapidly expanding knowledge and sub-specialization, it is becoming increasingly common to focus on one organ system. However, the human body is intimately linked, and disease processes affecting one region of the body not uncommonly affect the other organ systems as well. Understanding diseases from a macroscopic perspective, rather than a narrow vantage point, enables efficient and accurate diagnosis. This tenet holds true for diseases affecting both the thoracic and neurological systems; in isolation, the radiologic appearance of disease in one organ system may be nonspecific, but viewing the pathophysiologic process in both organ systems may markedly narrow the differential considerations, and potentially lead to a definitive diagnosis. In this article, we discuss a variety of disease entities known to affect both the thoracic and neurological systems, either manifesting simultaneously or at different periods of time. Some of these conditions may show neither thoracic nor neurological manifestations. These diseases have been systematically classified into infectious, immune-mediated / inflammatory, vascular, syndromic / hereditary and neoplastic disorders. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms linking both regions and radiologic appearances in both organ systems are discussed. When appropriate, brief clinical and diagnostic information is provided. Ultimately, accurate diagnosis will lead to expedited triage and prompt institution of potentially life-saving treatment for these groups of complex disorders.

3.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 65(2): 139-145, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to study anxiety and burnout among Division of Radiological Sciences (RADSC) staff during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify potential risk and protective factors. These outcomes were compared with non-RADSC staff. METHODS: A cross-sectional online study was conducted between 12 March and 20 July 2020 in the largest public tertiary hospital receiving COVID-19 cases. Burnout and anxiety were assessed with the Physician Work-Life Scale and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Scale, respectively. Workplace factors were examined as potential risk and protective factors using multivariable ordinary least squares regression analyses, adjusting for pertinent demographic characteristics. RESULTS: RADSC staff (n = 180) and non-RADSC staff (n = 1458) demonstrated moderate-to-severe anxiety rates of 6.7 and 13.2 % and burnout rates of 17.8 and 23.9 %, respectively. RADSC staff reported significantly lower anxiety (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 3.7 vs 4.9 ± 4.5; P-value < 0.05), burnout (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 0.7 vs 2.1 ± 0.8; P-value < 0.01), increased teamwork (82.2% vs 74.1%; P-value < 0.05) and fewer night shifts (36.7% vs 41.1%; P-value < 0.01). Among RADSC staff, higher job dedication was associated with lower anxiety (b (95% CI) = -0.28 (-0.45, -0.11)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = -0.07 (-0.11,-0.04)), while longer than usual working hours was associated with increased anxiety (b (95% CI) = 1.42 (0.36, 2.45)) and burnout (b (95% CI) = 0.28 (0.09, 0.48)). CONCLUSIONS: A proportion of RADSC staff reported significant burnout and anxiety, although less compared to the larger hospital cohort. Measures to prevent longer than usual work hours and increase feelings of enthusiasm and pride in one's job may further reduce the prevalence of anxiety problems and burnout in radiology departments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Radiology Department, Hospital , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
5.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 214(6): 1206-1210, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE. This article shares the ground operational perspective of how a tertiary hospital radiology department in Singapore is responding to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic. This same department was also deeply impacted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003. CONCLUSION. Though similar to SARS, the COVID-19 outbreak has several differences. We share how lessons from 2003 are applied and modified in our ongoing operational response to this evolving novel pathogen.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epidemics , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/standards , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Singapore/epidemiology
6.
Acad Radiol ; 27(9): 1193-1203, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634059

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is a pathogen that has shown an ability for sustained community transmission. To ensure utmost safety, radiology services will need to adapt to this disease in the coming months and possibly years ahead. This will include learning how to perform radiographs and CT in a safe and sustainable manner. Due to the risk of nosocomial spread of disease, the judicious use and implementation of strict infection protocols is paramount to limit healthcare worker and patient transmission. Between 28 January 2020 and 8 June 2020, our institution performed 12,034 radiographs and 178 CT scans for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. As of 8 June 2020, there have been no documented instances of healthcare staff acquiring COVID-19 during the course of work. In this article, we present the indications and operational considerations used by our institution to safely image patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Alternative practices for imaging radiographs are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Decontamination , Equipment Safety , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Occupational Health , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiography , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Eur Radiol ; 30(9): 4964-4967, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-108784

ABSTRACT

KEY POINTS: • Radiology services encountering the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic will need to modify their daily operational practices.• Leadership, patient risk stratification, adequate manpower, operational workflow clarity, and workplace/social responsibility will help Radiology services safely and sustainably deal with the current disease outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics , Radiography , Radiology , SARS-CoV-2
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