Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 48
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1271, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633329

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term functional outcome of discharged patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unresolved. We aimed to describe a 6-month follow-up of functional status of COVID-19 survivors. METHODS: We reviewed the data of COVID-19 patients who had been consecutively admitted to the Tumor Center of Union Hospital (Wuhan, China) between 15 February and 14 March 2020. We quantified a 6-month functional outcome reflecting symptoms and disability in COVID-19 survivors using a post-COVID-19 functional status scale ranging from 0 to 4 (PCFS). We examined the risk factors for the incomplete functional status defined as a PCFS > 0 at a 6-month follow-up after discharge. RESULTS: We included a total of 95 COVID-19 survivors with a median age of 62 (IQR 53-69) who had a complete functional status (PCFS grade 0) at baseline in this retrospective observational study. At 6-month follow-up, 67 (70.5%) patients had a complete functional outcome (grade 0), 9 (9.5%) had a negligible limited function (grade 1), 12 (12.6%) had a mild limited function (grade 2), 7 (7.4%) had moderate limited function (grade 3). Univariable logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between the onset symptoms of muscle or joint pain and an increased risk of incomplete function (unadjusted OR 4.06, 95% CI 1.33-12.37). This association remained after adjustment for age and admission delay (adjusted OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.06-10.81, p = 0.039). CONCLUSIONS: A small proportion of discharged COVID-19 patients may have an incomplete functional outcome at a 6-month follow-up; intervention strategies are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge , Follow-Up Studies , Functional Status , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 269, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621240

ABSTRACT

A complete diagnostic autopsy is the gold-standard to gain insight into Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pathogenesis. To delineate the in situ immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 viral infection, here we perform comprehensive high-dimensional transcriptional and spatial immune profiling in 22 COVID-19 decedents from Wuhan, China. We find TIM-3-mediated and PD-1-mediated immunosuppression as a hallmark of severe COVID-19, particularly in men, with PD-1+ cells being proximal rather than distal to TIM-3+ cells. Concurrently, lymphocytes are distal, while activated myeloid cells are proximal, to SARS-CoV-2 viral antigens, consistent with prevalent SARS-CoV-2 infection of myeloid cells in multiple organs. Finally, viral load positively correlates with specific immunosuppression and dendritic cell markers. In summary, our data show that SARS-CoV-2 viral infection induces lymphocyte suppression yet myeloid activation in severe COVID-19, so these two cell types likely have distinct functions in severe COVID-19 disease progression, and should be targeted differently for therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Autopsy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , China , Diagnosis , Female , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/genetics , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/immunology , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/genetics , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Load
4.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(8):824-830, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1524238

ABSTRACT

Objective: To identify and assess the potential communicable disease risk during the Third China International Import Expo (CIIE) in Shanghai in 2020 and provide evidence and suggestions for the emergency preparedness and response.

5.
J Clin Invest ; 131(19)2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDThe angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) D allele is more prevalent among African Americans compared with other races and ethnicities and has previously been associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pathogenesis through excessive ACE1 activity. ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB) may counteract this mechanism, but their association with COVID-19 outcomes has not been specifically tested in the African American population.METHODSWe identified 6218 patients who were admitted into Mount Sinai hospitals with COVID-19 between February 24 and May 31, 2020, in New York City. We evaluated whether the outpatient and in-hospital use of ACE-I/ARB is associated with COVID-19 in-hospital mortality in an African American compared with non-African American population.RESULTSOf the 6218 patients with COVID-19, 1138 (18.3%) were ACE-I/ARB users. In a multivariate logistic regression model, ACE-I/ARB use was independently associated with a reduced risk of in-hospital mortality in the entire population (OR, 0.655; 95% CI, 0.505-0.850; P = 0.001), African American population (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.249-0.779; P = 0.005), and non-African American population (OR, 0.748, 95% CI, 0.553-1.012, P = 0.06). In the African American population, in-hospital use of ACE-I/ARB was associated with improved mortality (OR, 0.378; 95% CI, 0.188-0.766; P = 0.006), whereas outpatient use was not (OR, 0.889; 95% CI, 0.375-2.158; P = 0.812). When analyzing each medication class separately, ARB in-hospital use was significantly associated with reduced in-hospital mortality in the African American population (OR, 0.196; 95% CI, 0.074-0.516; P = 0.001), whereas ACE-I use was not associated with impact on mortality in any population.CONCLUSIONIn-hospital use of ARB was associated with a significant reduction in in-hospital mortality among COVID-19-positive African American patients.FUNDINGNone.


Subject(s)
African Americans , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality/ethnology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 713733, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399151

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 infection was referred to sympathetic hyperactivity, which might increase the susceptibility of neuraxial anesthesia-related hypotension resulted from sympathetic inhibition. We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, propensity score matched (PSM) cohort study to determine whether COVID-19 parturients have an increased risk of hypotension after neuraxial anesthesia for cesarean delivery. Methods: Clinical data of COVID-19 parturients were collected from the electronic medical records from 1th January to 31th May, 2020 in three hospitals of Hubei Province, China. Information of Control parturients (without COVID-19) were obtained at the same institutions over a similar period in 2019. All American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status II full termed pregnant women who received cesarean delivery under neuraxial anesthesia were included. The primary objective was to obtain and compare the incidence of neuraxial anesthesia-related hypotension. Secondary objectives were the analysis of anesthetic implementation and administration, intraoperative maternal vital signs and adverse reactions, and neonatal Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min after delivery. The clinical characteristics of COVID-19 parturients were also analyzed. PSM was derived to balance the predictors for neuraxial anesthesia-related hypotension based on previous studies. Results: In present study, 101 COVID-19 parturients and 186 Control parturients were derived from 1,403 cases referenced to propensity score matching. The incidence of neuraxial anesthesia-related hypotension was 57.4% in COVID-19 parturients and 41.9% in Control parturients with an incidence risk ratio (IRR) of 1.37 (95% CI 1.08-1.74; P = 0.012; post-hoc Cramér's V = 0.15) in the PSM cohort. The incidences of nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and shaking were significantly higher in the COVID-19 group than Control group (48.5 vs. 17.2%, P < 0.001; 10.9 vs. 4.3%, P = 0.03; 18.8 vs. 3.2%, P < 0.001; 51.5 vs. 18.3%, P < 0.001; respectively). The Apgar scores at 1 min was significantly lower in newborns from COVID-19 parturients than that in Control babies (P = 0.04). Conclusions: An increased risk of neuraxial anesthesia-related hypotension in COVID-19 parturients undergoing cesarean delivery should be stressed.

8.
European Journal of Inflammation (Sage Publications, Ltd.) ; : 1-10, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1367668

ABSTRACT

Background: Lymphopenia is a marker of immunosuppression after severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) which is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between persistent lymphopenia and ARDS. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 125 patients with COVID-19 admitted to government-designated treatment center between 14 January 2020, and 20 March 2020 was conducted. We recorded all complete blood cell counts during the day 0th, 3rd, and 7th following the diagnosis of COVID-19. Patients were grouped based on the depression of the lymphocyte cell count, their return, or their failure to normal. The primary outcome was the occurrence of ARDS, and secondary outcomes included developing vital organ dysfunction and hospital lengths of stay. Results: 17.6% (22/125) patients developed ARDS. The lymphocyte counts with ARDS and non-ARDS were 0.94 × 109/L, 1.20 × 109/L at admission, respectively (p = 0.02). On the 3rd and 7th day, the median of lymphocyte count in ARDS was significantly lower than that of non-ARDS. Multivariable logistic regression, which was adjusting for potentially confounding factors (including age, comorbidities, and APACHE II score), showed that persistent lymphopenia within the 7th day was independently associated with ARDS (OR, 3.94 [95% CI, 1.26–12.33, p = 0.018). Further, patients with persistent lymphopenia had longer hospital lengths of stay (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results showed persistent lymphopenia predicted ARDS after COVID-19. Further studies are needed to investigate whether immunostimulation of lymphocytes within 1 week can reduce ARDS occurrence in patients with COVID-19. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of European Journal of Inflammation (Sage Publications, Ltd.) is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

9.
Ther Adv Respir Dis ; 15: 17534666211025221, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277888

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Physical inactivity is considered an important lifestyle factor for overweight and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate the association between pre-existent physical inactivity and the risk of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We included 164 (61.8 ± 13.6 years) patients with COVID-19 who were admitted between 15 February and 14 March 2020 in this retrospective study. We evaluated the association between pre-existent physical inactivity and severe COVID-19 using a logistic regression model. RESULTS: Of 164 eligible patients with COVID-19, 103 (62.8%) were reported to be physically inactive. Univariable logistic regression analysis showed that physical inactivity was associated with an increased risk of severe COVID-19 [unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 6.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-22.62]. In the multivariable regression analysis, physical inactivity remained significantly associated with an increased risk of severe COVID-19 (adjusted OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.12-15.14) after adjustment for age, sex, stroke, and overweight. CONCLUSION: Our data showed that pre-existent physical inactivity was associated with an increased risk of experiencing severe COVID-19. Our findings indicate that people should be encouraged to keep physically active to be at a lower risk of experiencing a severe illness when COVID-19 infection seems unpredicted.The reviews of this paper are available via the supplemental material section.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Sedentary Behavior , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , China , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Cell Res ; 31(8): 836-846, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275907

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 is frequently accompanied by dysfunction of the lungs and extrapulmonary organs. However, the organotropism of SARS-CoV-2 and the port of virus entry for systemic dissemination remain largely unknown. We profiled 26 COVID-19 autopsy cases from four cohorts in Wuhan, China, and determined the systemic distribution of SARS-CoV-2. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in the lungs and multiple extrapulmonary organs of critically ill COVID-19 patients up to 67 days after symptom onset. Based on organotropism and pathological features of the patients, COVID-19 was divided into viral intrapulmonary and systemic subtypes. In patients with systemic viral distribution, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in monocytes, macrophages, and vascular endothelia at blood-air barrier, blood-testis barrier, and filtration barrier. Critically ill patients with long disease duration showed decreased pulmonary cell proliferation, reduced viral RNA, and marked fibrosis in the lungs. Permanent SARS-CoV-2 presence and tissue injuries in the lungs and extrapulmonary organs suggest direct viral invasion as a mechanism of pathogenicity in critically ill patients. SARS-CoV-2 may hijack monocytes, macrophages, and vascular endothelia at physiological barriers as the ports of entry for systemic dissemination. Our study thus delineates systemic pathological features of SARS-CoV-2 infection, which sheds light on the development of novel COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , COVID-19/virology , China , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness , Female , Fibrosis , Hospitalization , Humans , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spleen/pathology , Spleen/virology , Trachea/pathology , Trachea/virology
11.
Front Cell Dev Biol ; 9: 664868, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273326

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most prevalent complications among hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Here, we aim to investigate the causes, risk factors, and outcomes of AKI in COVID-19 patients. We found that angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2) and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) were mainly expressed by different cell types in the human kidney. However, in autopsy kidney samples, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleoprotein was detected in ACE2+ or TMPRSS2+ renal tubular cells, whereas the RNAscope® Assay targeting the SARS-CoV-2 Spike gene was positive mainly in the distal tubular cells and seldom in the proximal tubular cells. In addition, the TMPRSS2 and kidney injury marker protein levels were significantly higher in the SARS-CoV-2-infected renal distal tubular cells, indicating that SARS-CoV-2-mediated AKI mainly occurred in the renal distal tubular cells. Subsequently, a cohort analysis of 722 patients with COVID-19 demonstrated that AKI was significantly related to more serious disease stages and poor prognosis of COVID-19 patients. The progressive increase of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level during the course of COVID-19 suggests that the patient's condition is aggravated. These results will greatly increase the current understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

12.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 35(6): e23804, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Before public health emergencies became a major challenge worldwide, the scope of laboratory management was only related to developing, maintaining, improving, and sustaining the quality of accurate laboratory results for improved clinical outcomes. Indeed, quality management is an especially important aspect and has achieved great milestones during the development of clinical laboratories. CURRENT STATUS: However, since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to be a threat worldwide, previous management mode inside the separate laboratory could not cater to the demand of the COVID-19 public health emergency. Among emerging new issues, the prominent challenges during the period of COVID-19 pandemic are rapid-launched laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) for urgent clinical application, rapid expansion of testing capabilities, laboratory medicine resources, and personnel shortages. These related issues are now impacting on clinical laboratory and need to be effectively addressed. CONCLUSION: Different from traditional views of laboratory medicine management that focus on separate laboratories, present clinical laboratory management must be multidimensional mode which should consider consolidation of the efficient network of regional clinical laboratories and reasonable planning of laboratories resources from the view of overall strategy. Based on relevant research and our experience, in this review, we retrospect the history trajectory of laboratory medicine management, and also, we provide existing and other feasible recommended management strategies for laboratory medicine in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Laboratories , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Humans , Laboratories/organization & administration , Laboratories/standards , Point-of-Care Testing , Public Health , Quality Assurance, Health Care
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 661052, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229177

ABSTRACT

While lymphocytopenia is a common characteristic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the mechanisms responsible for this lymphocyte depletion are unclear. Here, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical and immunological data from 18 fatal COVID-19 cases, results showed that these patients had severe lymphocytopenia, together with high serum levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10), and elevation of many other mediators in routine laboratory tests, including C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and natriuretic peptide type B. The spleens and hilar lymph nodes (LNs) from six additional COVID-19 patients with post-mortem examinations were also collected, histopathologic detection showed that both organs manifested severe tissue damage and lymphocyte apoptosis in these six cases. In situ hybridization assays illustrated that SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA accumulates in these tissues, and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed that coronavirus-like particles were visible in the LNs. SARS-CoV-2 Spike and Nucleocapsid protein (NP) accumulated in the spleens and LNs, and the NP antigen restricted in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) positive macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 triggered the transcription of Il6, Il8 and Il1b genes in infected primary macrophages and DCs in vitro, and SARS-CoV-2-NP+ macrophages and DCs also manifested high levels of IL-6 and IL-1ß, which might directly decimate human spleens and LNs and subsequently lead to lymphocytopenia in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 induced lymphocytopenia by promoting systemic inflammation and direct neutralization in human spleen and LNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spleen/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Lymph Nodes/ultrastructure , Lymphopenia/etiology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , RNA, Messenger/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spleen/ultrastructure
14.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e928837, 2021 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1161104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. To further reveal the pathologic associations between coronavirus and hypoxemia, we report the findings of 4 complete systematic autopsies of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-positive individuals who died of multiple organ failure caused by severe hypoxemia. MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined the donated corpses of 4 deceased patients who had been diagnosed with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. A complete post-mortem examination was carried out on each corpse, and multiple organs were macroscopically examined. RESULTS The 4 corpses were 2 males and 2 females, with an average age of 69 years. Bilateral lungs showed various degrees of atrophy and consolidation, with diffusely tough and solid texture in the sections. A thromboembolism was found in the main pulmonary artery extending into the atrium in 1 corpse, and significant atherosclerotic plaques tagged in the inner wall of the aortic arch were found in 2 corpses. Two corpses were found to have slightly atrophied bilateral renal parenchyma. Atrophic changes in the spleen were found in 2 corpses. Notably, there were significantly expanded alveolar septa and prominent fibroblastic proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The laboratory data of these corpses showed a progressive decrease in blood oxygen saturation, followed by refractory and irreversible hypoxemia. Clinical and laboratory information and autopsy and histologic presentations of multiple organs showed insufficient air exchange due to abnormalities in the respiratory system, and reduced erythropoiesis in bone marrow may play a role.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/pathology , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Aggregation , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Mucus/metabolism , Myocardium/pathology , Necrosis , Pneumonia/complications , Thoracic Cavity/pathology
15.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e932092, 2021 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148747

ABSTRACT

This manuscript has been retracted due to the identification of undeclared duplication of content, including Figure images, from a -previous publication by some of the authors: Wang C, Xie J, Zhao L, Fei X, Zhang H, Tan Y, Nie X, Zhou L, Liu Z, Ren Y, Yuan L, Zhang Y, Zhang J, Liang L, Chen X, Liu X, Wang P, Han X, Weng X, Chen Y, Yu T, Zhang X, Cai J, Chen R, Shi ZL, Bian XW. Alveolar macrophage dysfunction and cytokine storm in the pathogenesis of two severe COVID-19 patients. EBioMedicine. 2020; 57: 102833. All authors are requested to declare that manuscripts submitted to this journal are original. This journal makes clear that research fraud of any kind will not be tolerated and will result in immediate retraction.

16.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e932092, 2021 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138933

ABSTRACT

This manuscript has been retracted due to the identification of undeclared duplication of content, including Figure images, from a -previous publication by some of the authors: Wang C, Xie J, Zhao L, Fei X, Zhang H, Tan Y, Nie X, Zhou L, Liu Z, Ren Y, Yuan L, Zhang Y, Zhang J, Liang L, Chen X, Liu X, Wang P, Han X, Weng X, Chen Y, Yu T, Zhang X, Cai J, Chen R, Shi ZL, Bian XW. Alveolar macrophage dysfunction and cytokine storm in the pathogenesis of two severe COVID-19 patients. EBioMedicine. 2020; 57: 102833. All authors are requested to declare that manuscripts submitted to this journal are original. This journal makes clear that research fraud of any kind will not be tolerated and will result in immediate retraction.

17.
Natl Sci Rev ; 7(12): 1868-1878, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087785

ABSTRACT

Systematic autopsy and comprehensive pathological analyses of COVID-19 decedents should provide insights into the disease characteristics and facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. In this study, we report the autopsy findings from the lungs and lymphatic organs of 12 COVID-19 decedents-findings that evaluated histopathological changes, immune cell signature and inflammatory factor expression in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes. Here we show that the major pulmonary alterations included diffuse alveolar damage, interstitial fibrosis and exudative inflammation featured with extensive serous and fibrin exudates, macrophage infiltration and abundant production of inflammatory factors (IL-6, IP-10, TNFα and IL-1ß). The spleen and hilar lymph nodes contained lesions with tissue structure disruption and immune cell dysregulation, including lymphopenia and macrophage accumulation. These findings provide pathological evidence that links injuries of the lungs and lymphatic organs with the fatal systematic respiratory and immune malfunction in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

18.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 151-160, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early reports indicate that AKI is common among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and associated with worse outcomes. However, AKI among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in the United States is not well described. METHODS: This retrospective, observational study involved a review of data from electronic health records of patients aged ≥18 years with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 admitted to the Mount Sinai Health System from February 27 to May 30, 2020. We describe the frequency of AKI and dialysis requirement, AKI recovery, and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with mortality. RESULTS: Of 3993 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, AKI occurred in 1835 (46%) patients; 347 (19%) of the patients with AKI required dialysis. The proportions with stages 1, 2, or 3 AKI were 39%, 19%, and 42%, respectively. A total of 976 (24%) patients were admitted to intensive care, and 745 (76%) experienced AKI. Of the 435 patients with AKI and urine studies, 84% had proteinuria, 81% had hematuria, and 60% had leukocyturia. Independent predictors of severe AKI were CKD, men, and higher serum potassium at admission. In-hospital mortality was 50% among patients with AKI versus 8% among those without AKI (aOR, 9.2; 95% confidence interval, 7.5 to 11.3). Of survivors with AKI who were discharged, 35% had not recovered to baseline kidney function by the time of discharge. An additional 28 of 77 (36%) patients who had not recovered kidney function at discharge did so on posthospital follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: AKI is common among patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and is associated with high mortality. Of all patients with AKI, only 30% survived with recovery of kidney function by the time of discharge.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/urine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hematuria/etiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Inpatients , Leukocytes , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Proteinuria/etiology , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Urine/cytology
20.
Sci Total Environ ; 767: 145124, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039559

ABSTRACT

An effective early warning tool is of great administrative and social significance to the containment and control of an epidemic. Facing the unprecedented global public health crisis caused by COVID-19, wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) has been given high expectations as a promising surveillance complement to clinical testing which had been plagued by limited capacity and turnaround time. In particular, recent studies have highlighted the role WBE may play in being a part of the early warning system. In this study, we briefly discussed the basics of the concept, the benefits and critical points of such an application, the challenges faced by the scientific community, the progress made so far, and what awaits to be addressed by future studies to make the concept work. We identified that the shedding dynamics of infected individuals, especially in the form of a mathematical shedding model, and the back-calculation of the number of active shedders from observed viral load are the major bottlenecks of WBE application in the COVID-19 pandemic that deserve more attention, and the sampling strategy (location, timing, and interval) needs to be optimized to fit the purpose and scope of the WBE project.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Waste Water , Wastewater-Based Epidemiological Monitoring
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...