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1.
Front Surg ; 9: 742007, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865477

ABSTRACT

Objective: The novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a global health crisis since first case was identified in December 2019. As the pandemic continues to strain global public health systems, elective surgeries for thoracic cancer, such as early-stage lung cancer and esophageal cancer (EC), have been postponed due to a shortage of medical resources and the risk of nosocomial transmission. This review is aimed to discuss the influence of COVID-19 on thoracic surgical practice, prevention of nosocomial transmission during the pandemic, and propose modifications to the standard practices in the surgical management of different thoracic cancer. Methods: A literature search of PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar was performed for articles focusing on COVID-19, early-stage lung cancer, and EC prior to 1 July 2021. The evidence from articles was combined with our data and experience. Results: We review the challenges in the management of different thoracic cancer from the perspectives of thoracic surgeons and propose rational strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of early-stage lung cancer and EC during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the optimization of hospital systems and medical resources is to fight against COVID-19. Indolent early lung cancers, such as pure ground-glass nodules/opacities (GGOs), can be postponed with a lower risk of progression, while selective surgeries of more biologically aggressive tumors should be prioritized. As for EC, we recommend immediate or prioritized surgeries for patients with stage Ib or more advanced stage and patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Routine COVID-19 screening should be performed preoperatively before thoracic surgeries. Prevention of nosocomial transmission by providing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), such as N-95 respirator masks with eye protection to healthcare workers, is necessary.

2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 743368, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775905

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the association of gender, ethnicity, living region, and socioeconomic status (SES) with health literacy and attitudes toward nevi and melanoma in Chinese adolescents and to examine whether health literacy mediates the association of SES with attitudes. Study Design: A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among newly enrolled college students. First-year students were recruited from five universities in different regions of China in 2018 using the cluster sampling method. The observers were blinded to the participants. Methods: Health literacy and attitudes were measured using a previously validated tool (Nevus and Melanoma Health Literacy and attitudes Test). SES was measured by annual family income and parental highest educational level. Nonparametric test was used to examine the association of participants' characteristics with health literacy and attitudes. Two-level generalized linear model with logarithm link function and Gamma distribution was used individually for SES. The mediation effect model was used to examine the mediation effect of health literacy. Results: A total of 21,086 questionnaires were completed by college students with a mean age of 18.0 ± 0.8 years. The mean scores of health literacy and attitudes were 9.83 ± 7.46 (maximum score: 28) and 16.98 ± 2.92 (maximum score: 20), respectively. Female, Han nationality, annual family income, and parental educational levels were positively associated with health literacy and attitudes. Regional differences showed different effects on health literacy and attitudes. A mediation model showed that literacy mediated the association of SES with attitudes toward nevi and melanoma. Health literacy mediated ~30-50% of the association of SES with attitudes. Conclusions: Melanoma-related health literacy among Chinese college students is generally insufficient and needs to be improved. Targeted and personalized health education for improving health literacy related to nevi and melanoma may improve the general population's attitudes and further promote health-related behavior to prevent and identify early-stage melanoma.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Melanoma , Students , Adolescent , Attitude , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Promotion , Humans , Socioeconomic Factors
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 751579, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775937

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Night shift work is common in the current working environment and is a risk factor for many diseases. The study aimed to explore the relationship between night shift work with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), and the modification effect of circadian dysfunction on it. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Chinese workers. Exposure was measured by night work history and duration. Circadian dysfunction was characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). The diagnosis of CSU was made by dermatologists who were investigating on the spot. The effect size was expressed as odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 8,057 participants were recruited, and 7,411 (92%) with complete information were included in the final analyses. The prevalence rates of CSU for workers without night shift and those with night shift history were 0.73 and 1.28%, respectively. Compared with workers who never worked night shifts, the risk of CSU increased with the length of night shift work: OR = 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-3.06) for duration <5 years and OR = 1.91 (95% CI: 1.12-3.26) for duration ≥5 years. EDS s EDS has been shown to modify this combination. Among workers without EDS, there was no association between night shift and CSU (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.49-1.79). Whereas, in participants with EDS, the correlation was significant (OR = 3.58; 95% CI: 1.14-11.20). However, the effect modification by sleep disturbance was not observed. Conclusions: Night shift work is a risk factor for CSU, and there is a dose-response relationship between night shift work hours and the risk of CSU. This connection may be modified by circadian dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Shift Work Schedule , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Shift Work Schedule/adverse effects , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
5.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729849
6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315407

ABSTRACT

Background: As phases of COVID-19 vaccination are quickly rolling out, how to evaluate the vaccination effects and then make safe reopening plans has become a prime concern for local governments and school officials. Methods: : We develop a contact network agent-based model (CN-ABM) to simulate on-campus disease transmission scenarios at the micro-scale. The CN-ABM establishes a contact network for each agent based on their daily activity pattern, evaluates the agent's health status change in different activity environments, and then simulates the epidemic curve on campus. Based on the developed model, we identify how different community risk levels, teaching modalities, and vaccination rates would shape the epidemic curve. Results: : The results show that in scenarios where vaccination is not available, restricting on-campus students to under 50% can largely flatten the epi curve (peak value < 2%);and the best result (peak value < 1%) can be achieved by limiting on-campus students to less than 25%. In scenarios where vaccination is available, it is suggested to maintain a maximum of 75% on-campus students and a vaccination rate of at least 45% to suppress the curve (peak value < 2%);and the best result (peak value < 1%) can be achieved at a vaccination rate of 65%. The study also derives the transmission chain of infectious agents, which can be used to identify high-risk activity environments. Conclusions: : The developed CN-ABM model can be employed to evaluate the health outcome of COVID-19 outbreaks on campus based on different disease transmission scenarios. It can assist local government and school officials with developing proactive intervention strategies to safely reopen schools.

7.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315361

ABSTRACT

Background: Dyslipidemia plays an important role in the pathogenesis and evolution of critical illness, but limited information exists regarding the lipid metabolism of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate role of dyslipidemia in patients with severe COVID-19 Methods: : We retrospectively reviewed 216 severe COVID-19 patients with clarified outcomes (discharged or deceased), admitted to the West Court of Union Hospital in Wuhan, China, between February 1 and March 31, 2020. The dynamic changes of lipid profiles and their relationships with disease severity and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results: : A total of 216 severe COVID-19 patients, including 24 non-survivors and 192 survivors, were included in the final analyses. The levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein AI (Apo-AI) on admission were significantly lower in non-survivors compared to survivors. During hospitalization, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol(TC), HDL-C and Apo-AI were shown an increasing trend in survivors, but maintained lower levels or shown downward trend in non-survivors. The serum levels of HDL-C and Apo-AI were inversely correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP), length of hospital stay of survivors and disease severity. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis identified a CRP/ HDL-C ratio cut-off value of 62.54 as the predictor for in-hospital mortality (AUC=0.823, Sensitivity=83.3%, Specificity=70.8%). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that hypertension, neutrophils-to-lymphocytes ratio(NLR), platelet count and high CRP/ HDL-C ratio (>62.54) were independent factors to predict in-hospital mortality. Conclusions: : The results demonstrated that dyslipidemia was associated with the inflammatory response, disease severity and poor prognosis of COVID-19. High CRP/ HDL-C ratio may serve as an independently potential predictor for hospital mortality among patients with severe COVID-19.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313457

ABSTRACT

Background: Though many studies have described the association of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and different kinds of noncommunicable chronic diseases, information with the combine effects of comorbidities to COVID-19 patients have not been well characterized yet. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of numbers of comorbidities with critical type and death of COVID-19. Methods: : This was a single-centered retrospective study among patients with COVID-19. All patients with COVID-19 enrolled in this study were diagnosed according to World Health Organization interim guidance. Six different kinds of noncommunicable chronic diseases were included in this study. The logistic regression model was used to estimate the fixed effect of numbers of comorbidities on critical type or death, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: : In total, 475 COVID-19 patients were enrolled in our study, included 234 females and 241 males. Hypertension was the most frequent type (162 [34.1%] of 475 patients). Patients with two or more comorbidities have higher risk of critical type (OR 3.072, 95% CI [1.581, 5.970], p=0.001) and death (OR 5.538, 95% CI [1.577, 19.451], p=0.008) compared to patients without comorbidities. And the results were similar after adjusting for age and gender in critical type (OR 2.021, 95% CI [1.002–4.077], p=0.049) and death (OR 3.653, 95% CI [0.989, 13.494], p=0.052). Conclusions: : The number of comorbidities was an independent risk factor for critical type and death in COVID-19 patients.

9.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312647

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly spread throughout worldwide. Hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease were the most common coexisting illness among patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. We aim to analyze the effect of them on the result of laboratory finding in patients with severe or critical SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: : The date of a total of 49 patients who met the inclusion criteria from January 12 to March 20, 2020, from the first affiliated hospital of Harbin medical university were analyzed in our study. Results: : Compared with patients without any coexisting illness, we found that PT levels were decreased in patients with cerebrovascular disease, hypertension or cardiovascular disease, and D-Dimer levels were decreased in patients with cerebrovascular disease, hypertension or diabetes. Similarly, LDH and ALT levels were lower in patients with cerebrovascular disease than that without any coexisting illness. Conclusions: : Hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease are associated with an increased disease severity and risk of death in patients with COVID-19. Recently study also reported that the levels of PT, D-dimer, and LDH were increased and predicted the deterioration of disease in severe patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that the levels of laboratory indicators such as PT, D-dimer, LDH and ALT were decreased in patients with coexisting illness than without any coexisting illness. It may give us the inaccurate result when we use those laboratory indicators to predict the deterioration of the patients and we need to pay more attention to it.

10.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311720

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) ineluctably caused social distancing and unemployment, which may bring additional health risks for patients with cancer. To investigate the association of the pandemic-related impacts with the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with melanoma during the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted a cross-sectional study among Chinese patients with melanoma. Methods A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed to melanoma patients through social media. Demographic and clinical data, and pandemic-related impacts (unemployment and income loss) were collected. HRQoL was determined by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) and its disease-specific module (the melanoma subscale, MS). Results A total of 70 patients with melanoma completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.2 ± 14.8 years, 45.7% (32/70) were male, and 21.4% (15/70) were unemployed since the epidemic. Unemployment of the patients and their family members and income loss were significantly associated with a lower FACT-G score, while the MS score was associated with the unemployment of the patients’ family members. Conclusions Our findings suggested that unemployment is associated with impaired HRQoL in melanoma patients during the COVID-19 epidemic.

11.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308291

ABSTRACT

According to the CDC, one key step of preventing oneself from contracting coronavirus (COVID-19) is to avoid touching eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. However, touching one's face is a frequent and spontaneous behavior---one study observed subjects touching their faces on average 23 times per hour. Creative solutions have emerged amongst some recent commercial and hobbyists' projects, yet most either are closed-source or lack validation in performance. We develop FaceOff---a sensing technique using a commodity wrist-worn accelerometer to detect face-touching behavior based on the specific motion pattern of raising one's hand towards the face. We report a survey (N=20) that elicits different ways people touch their faces, an algorithm that temporally ensembles data-driven models to recognize when a face touching behavior occurs and results from a preliminary user testing (N=3 for a total of about 90 minutes).

12.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325173

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 continues to spread globally and results in additional challenges for perioperative management in parturients. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and identify associated factors for neuraxial anaesthesia-related hypotension in COVDI-19 parturients during caesarean delivery. Methods: : We performed a multicenter case-control study at 3 medical institutions in Hubei province, China form 1th January to 30th May 2020. All ASA Physical Status II full termed pregnant women who received caesarean delivery under neuraxial anaesthesia were eligible for inclusion. The univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to identified the independent predictors of neuraxial anaesthesia-related hypotension. Results: : Present study included 102 COVID-19 parturients. The incidence of neuraxial anaesthesia-related hypotension was 58%. Maternal abnormal lymphocyte count (OR = 3.41, p = 0.03), full stomach (OR = 3.22, p = 0.04), baseline heart rate (OR = 1.04, p = 0.03), experience of anaesthetist (OR = 0.86, p = 0.02) and surgeon (OR = 0.76, p = 0.03), and combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia technique (OR = 3.27, p = 0.02) were associated with neuraxial anaesthesia-related hypotension. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve achieved 0.83 which was significantly higher than 0.5 (p < 0.001). And the sensitivity, specificity and percentage correct were 75%, 79% and 75%, respectively. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed a good calibration of the model (H = 2.01, DF = 8, p = 0.98). Conclusions: : Maternal abnormal lymphocyte count, full stomach, baseline heart rate, experience of anaesthetist and surgeon, and combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia technique were identified as the independent predictors of neuraxial anaesthesia-related hypotension.

13.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324556

ABSTRACT

Background: Over 240000 cases of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has been reported since Dec. 2019. We aim to assess the use of D-dimer as a biomarker for disease severity and clinical outcome in COVID-19 patients. Methods: : We retrospectively analyzed the clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics of 248 consecutive cases of COVID-19 in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China from Jan 28 to Mar 08, 2020. Correlations of D-dimer upon admission with clinical staging, radiological staging, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristics curve was used to determine the optimal cutoff level for D-dimer that discriminated those survivors versus non-survivors during hospitalization. Results: : D-dimer elevation (≥0.50mg/L) was seen in 74.6% (185/248) of the patients. Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were ruled out in patients with high probability of thrombosis. D-dimer levels significantly increased with increasing severity of COVID-19 as determined by clinical staging (Kendall's tau_b = 0.374, P=0.000) and chest CT staging (Kendall's tau_b = 0.378, P=0.000). In-hospital mortality rate was 6.9%. Median D-dimer level in non-survivors (n=17) was significantly higher than in survivors (n=231) [6.21 (3.79-16.01) mg/L versus 1.02 (0.47-2.66) mg/L, P=0.000]. D-dimer level of >2.14 mg/L predicted in-hospital mortality with a sensitivity of 88.2% and specificity of 71.3% (AUC 0.85;95% CI=0.77-0.92). Conclusions: : D-dimer is commonly elevated in patients with COVID-19. D-dimer levels correlate with disease severity and is a reliable prognostic marker for in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for COVID-19.

14.
15.
Vaccine ; 40(3): 403-405, 2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569119

ABSTRACT

Mass COVID-19 vaccination, as the last resort to bring society to a new normal, has been rapidly rolled out in the US. However, because of the lifting of international travel restrictions, amid the many uncertainties induced by the emerging B.1.1.529 variant, it remains unclear about the timeline of reaching herd immunity and when our daily life will return to normalcy. Since access to a vaccine is an important predicate to the achievement of herd immunity, we articulate the vaccine access issue as the degree of fit between patients and the healthcare system in five dimensions: availability, accessibility, accommodation, affordability, and acceptability. These five dimensions can be adopted in existing health practice and policy to elucidate effective strategies for raising COVID-19 vaccination rates and improving vaccine equity in the fight against the new variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunity, Herd , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
16.
Psychol Res Behav Manag ; 14: 1889-1900, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551374

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the sleep quality and depression-anxiety-stress state of frontline nurses in high-risk areas who conduct nucleic acid sampling testing for COVID-19 to provide a basis for formulating intervention programs in crisis management. METHODS: From August 22 to 30, 2021, a convenient sampling method was used in Zhangjiajie City, Hunan Province, China. A total of 248 frontline nurses who performed nucleic acid sample collection were selected. The following tests were used: the general information questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Questionnaire (PSQI), and Depression-Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21). RESULTS: A total of 236 nurses completed the survey; 88.14% (n = 208) were women, the average age was 33.02±6.81, the PSQI score was 15 (13-17), and 231 (97.88%) nurses had sleep disorders during the period in Zhangjiajie, 219 nurses (81.36%) had anxiety, 135 nurses (45.76%) had depression, and 112 nurses (42.59%) felt stressed. Spearman correlation analysis was used to associate the PSQI with the DASS-21. The results showed that the use of hypnotic drugs was negatively correlated with DASS-21 (P<0.05), while the rest were positively correlated. The results of the multivariate analysis of sleep disorders showed that depression, anxiety, and stress were related to sleep quality (P<0.05), and there was no statistical difference in the other variables. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the sleep quality and depression-anxiety-stress state of the frontline nurses performing nucleic acid testing were adversely affected. Sleep disturbance is a serious problem among nurses testing for the delta strain during the pandemic. Anxiety, stress, and depression are associated with sleep disorders. It is necessary to take corresponding measures and conduct crisis management interventions to improve sleep quality and mental health adjustment during public health emergencies.

17.
Immun Inflamm Dis ; 10(1): 33-42, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527435

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the improvements in laboratory testing procedures and the quality and safety management for large-scale population screening for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: Because of epidemic prevention and control needs in Hebei Province, on January 7, 2021, the Health Commission of Zhejiang Province sent a medical team to Hebei Province, to carry out SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid testing. Screening for the SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test was performed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Practical tests and repeated process optimization were adopted to explore the optimal solution for improving laboratory testing procedures and the quality of and safety management for large-scale population screening for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: The Zhejiang medical team completed 250,000 pooled SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid samples in 24 days in Shijiazhuang, with a peak daily testing capacity of 40,246 samples testing. There were no false-negative or false-positive results, and no laboratory personnel was infected with SARS-CoV-2. Significant achievements have been made in SARS-CoV-2 prevention and control. CONCLUSIONS: This report summarizes the effort of the medical team regarding their management of the quality and safety of laboratory tests and proposes corresponding empirical recommendations to provide a reference for future large-scale population screening SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Laboratories
19.
Infect Drug Resist ; 14: 3029-3040, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362161

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 can damage not only the lungs but also the liver and kidney. Most critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have liver and kidney dysfunction. We aim to investigate the levels of liver and kidney function indexes in mild and severe COVID-19 patients and their capability to predict the severity of the disease. METHODS: The characteristics and laboratory indexes were compared between patients with different conditions. We applied binary logistic regression to find the independent risk factors of severe patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to predict the severity of COVID-19 using the liver and kidney function indexes. RESULTS: This study enrolled 266 COVID-19 patients, including 235 mild patients and 31 severe patients. Compared with mild patients, severe patients had lower albumin (ALB) and higher alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and urea nitrogen (BUN) (all p<0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis also identified ALB [OR=0.273 (0.079-0.947), p=0.041] and ALT [OR=2.680 (1.036-6.934), p=0.042] as independent factors of severe COVID-19 patients. Combining ALB, ALT, BUN, and LDH exhibited the area under ROC at 0.914, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 83.0%. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients, especially severe patients, have damage to liver and kidney function. ALT, AST, LDH, and BUN could be independent factors for predicting the severity of COVID-19. Combining the ALB, ALT, BUN, and LDH could predict the transition from mild to severe in COVID-19 patients.

20.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(10): 1563-1565, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the United States, distribution plans for the COVID-19 vaccination were established at the state level. However, some states, such as Connecticut, followed an age-based strategy without considering occupations or co-morbid conditions due to its simplicity in implementation. This strategy raised concerns about exacerbating health inequities because it did not prioritize vulnerable communities, specifically, minorities and low-income groups. The study aims to examine the vaccination inequities among different population groups for people aged 65+. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of quantile-based independent sample t-test was employed to examine the relationship between eight social vulnerability indices (SVIs, i.e., below poverty, unemployed, without high school diploma, disability, minority, speaks English less than well, no vehicle, and mobile homes) and vaccination rates at the town level in Connecticut during the second phase of the vaccine distribution plan when individuals aged 65 and over were eligible. Negative binomial regressions were employed to further justify the relationships between SVIs and vaccination rates. RESULTS: The report shows that the differences in vaccination rates were statistically significant between the most vulnerable and the least vulnerable towns with respect to six SVIs (i.e., below poverty, without high school diploma, disability, minority, speaks English less than well, and no vehicle). The vaccination gap was greater for people aged 75+ than people aged 65-74. Among the selected SVIs, below poverty was negatively correlated with the vaccination rate for 75+, and without high school diploma was negatively correlated with both rates. CONCLUSIONS: This report reveals the significant health inequities in COVID-19 vaccination among the elderly population at the early vaccination phase. It can shed insights into health policy initiatives to improve vaccination coverage in the elderly communities, such as promoting onsite scheduling and increasing at-home vaccination services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Aged , Connecticut , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vaccination
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