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1.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(1): e20-e27, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522385

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of burnout and its work-related factors among public health providers (PHP) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We surveyed 366 PHP in May 2021 on their burnout, demographic, and work-related characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify associated factors. RESULTS: 45% PHP reported burnout. Higher PHP burnout was associated with younger age (AOR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.99), prolonged COVID-19 involvement (AOR 2.35, 95% CI 1.16-4.72), as well as perceiving medium (AOR 2.10, 95% CI 1.27-3.48) and high emotional demand (AOR 4.45, 95% CI 1.67-11.77), low (AOR 2.10, 95% CI 1.27-3.48) and medium (AOR 4.18, 95% CI 1.64-10.59) role clarity, medium job satisfaction (AOR 3.21, 95% CI: 1.11-9.29), and low organisational justice (AOR 3.32, 95% CI 1.51-7.27). CONCLUSIONS: Improving job content and organisational characteristics may be key to reducing PHP burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Workforce , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Prevalence , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 747953, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485130

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has had monumental effects on the mental health of populations worldwide. Previous research indicated that programs and interventions using social networks can play a positive role in promoting mental health. Nevertheless, current evidence is largely derived from high-income regions, reflecting an urgent need for more studies in low- and middle-income settings. Objectives: This paper aims to (a) describe the potential value of a hybrid health carnival in promoting mental health and increasing access to screening services; (b) assess the level of community engagement with the digital platform. Methods: A mental health carnival was conducted with the theme of "Mind Your Mental Health" (Cakna Kesihatan Mental) in conjunction with the World Mental Health Day in Malaysia. This was a hybrid carnival that combined elements of face-to-face interactions and virtual learning. Free online therapy sessions were offered to high-risk groups identified during the screening process. Social media metrics were utilized to report the levels of community engagement and participants completed pre-and post-assessments to measure the program's impact on their knowledge. Results: The carnival was attended by 515 participants (78.8% virtual participants). Social media metrics reported more than 5,585 reaches on Facebook for all the activities held throughout the event. Results from pre-and post-assessments showed significant improvement in the mean knowledge scores (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This digital approach will continue to evolve by releasing new features and tools as a new frontier for high-risk populations and all individuals seeking mental health support and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154379

ABSTRACT

To curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus (COVID-19) in Malaysia, the government imposed a nationwide movement control order (MCO) from 18 March 2020 to 3 May 2020. It was enforced in four phases (i.e., MCO 1, MCO 2, MCO 3 and MCO 4). In this paper, we propose an initiative to assess the impact of MCO by using time-varying reproduction number (Rt). We used data from the Johns Hopkins University Centre for Systems Science and Engineering Coronavirus repository. Day 1 was taken from the first assumed local transmission of COVID-19. We estimated Rt by using the EpiEstim package and plotted the epidemic curve and Rt. Then, we extracted the mean Rt at day 1, day 5 and day 10 for all MCO phases and compared the differences. The Rt values peaked around day 43, which was shortly before the start of MCO 1. The means for Rt at day 1, day 5, and day 10 for all MCOs ranged between 0.665 and 1.147. The average Rt gradually decreased in MCO 1 and MCO 2. Although spikes in the number of confirmed cases were observed when restrictions were gradually relaxed in the later MCO phases, the situation remained under control with Rt values being stabilised to below unity level (Rt value less than one).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Basic Reproduction Number , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Journal of Clinical and Health Sciences ; 5(1):26-41, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-937839

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought much fear and anxiety worldwide due to the rapid transmission rate and mortality. The exponential surge of COVID- 19 cases need to be addressed aggressively to flatten the epidemic curve. This review aims to describe the COVID-19 disease epidemiology and disease transmission, response actions taken by the authorities to control this pandemic and risk communication strategies in Malaysia. A literature search via the ScienceDirect and Google Scholar databases of published articles and official statements from the Ministry of Health, Malaysia from December 2019 to May 2020 was conducted. The first wave of COVID-19 outbreak in Malaysia started in late January involving 22 cases but the second wave involved more cases due to the massive religious gathering that occurred in late February. Malaysia implemented the Movement Control Order (MCO) on 18<sup>th</sup> March 2020 and other well-coordinated response action plans to prevent community transmission. The reproduction number (R<sub>0</sub>) was successfully reduced from 3.6 to 0.3 due to the MCO. Malaysia's risk communication strategies that include daily press conference by the Director General of Health and dissemination of information through national television and social media, played a crucial role in dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak. In conclusion, effective response actions and mitigation plans, should be the main priorities to combat this pandemic. The immediate direction will need to be focused on development of vaccines for COVID-19. Future research should study the origin of the virus in animals and the role of comorbidities contributing to poorer prognosis.

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