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1.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 427, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795805

ABSTRACT

Abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism in COVID-19 patients were recently reported with unclear mechanism. In this study, we retrospectively investigated a cohort of COVID-19 patients without pre-existing metabolic-related diseases, and found new-onset insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and decreased HDL-C in these patients. Mechanistically, SARS-CoV-2 infection increased the expression of RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST), which modulated the expression of secreted metabolic factors including myeloperoxidase, apelin, and myostatin at the transcriptional level, resulting in the perturbation of glucose and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, several lipids, including (±)5-HETE, (±)12-HETE, propionic acid, and isobutyric acid were identified as the potential biomarkers of COVID-19-induced metabolic dysregulation, especially in insulin resistance. Taken together, our study revealed insulin resistance as the direct cause of hyperglycemia upon COVID-19, and further illustrated the underlying mechanisms, providing potential therapeutic targets for COVID-19-induced metabolic complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Hyperglycemia/blood , Insulin Resistance , Lipid Metabolism , Lipids/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330371

ABSTRACT

Population antibody response is believed to be important in selection of new variant viruses. We identified that SARS-CoV-2 infections elicit a population immune response mediated by a lineage of VH1-69 germline antibodies. The representative antibody R1-32 targets a novel semi-cryptic epitope defining a new class of RBD targeting antibodies. Binding to this non-ACE2 competing epitope leading to spike destruction impairing virus entry. Based on epitope location, neutralization mechanism and analysis of antibody binding to spike variants we propose that recurrent substitutions at 452 and 490 are associated with immune evasion of this population antibody response. These substitutions, including L452R found in the Delta variant, disrupt interaction mediated by the VH1-69 specific hydrophobic HCDR2 to impair antibody-antigen association allowing variants to escape. Lacking 452/490 substitutions, the Omicron variant is sensitive to this class of antibodies. Our results provide new insights into SARS-CoV-2 variant genesis and immune evasion.

3.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-326144

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited knowledge regarding the potential impact of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines on the thyroid. Methods: We performed a randomized controlled trial between April 15 and April 28, 2021, and a prospective cohort study between May 8 and June 30, 2021, enrolling recipients of the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Thyroid function, antithyroid antibody levels, and SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) levels were detected for each participant before receiving the first dose and 28 days after receiving the second dose. Findings: A total of 657 recipients participated in the study. Among the 564 participants with normal thyroid function at baseline, 36 (6·38%) developed thyroid dysfunction. Of the 545 recipients with negative antithyroid antibodies at baseline, none developed abnormal antibodies after vaccination. Notably, 70 (75·27%) of the 93 recipients with thyroid dysfunction, returned to normal function after vaccination. The levels of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb;96·20%) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb;88·31%) remained positive after vaccination in most patients with abnormal values at baseline. However, the TgAb levels in more than half of the patients decreased. All of abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody (TRAb) levels at baseline decreased post-vaccination. Only the levels of total triiodothyronine (TT3), total thyroxine (TT4), TgAb pre-vaccination, and TT4 levels post-vaccination, showed a mild correlation with SARS-CoV-2 NAb titers. Interpretation: Vaccination with an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine had no severe impact on thyroid function or antithyroid antibodies. Our study provides evidence-based support for the clinical application of SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccines in patients with thyroid diseases.Funding The Talent Program of the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University. Trial Registration Details: Both the randomized controlled trial and prospective cohort study were registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR2100045109 and ChiCTR2100042222, respectively).

4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 428, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585884

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced hyper-inflammation links to the acute lung injury and COVID-19 severity. Identifying the primary mediators that initiate the uncontrolled hypercytokinemia is essential for treatments. Mast cells (MCs) are strategically located at the mucosa and beneficially or detrimentally regulate immune inflammations. In this study, we showed that SARS-CoV-2-triggered MC degranulation initiated alveolar epithelial inflammation and lung injury. SARS-CoV-2 challenge induced MC degranulation in ACE-2 humanized mice and rhesus macaques, and a rapid MC degranulation could be recapitulated with Spike-RBD binding to ACE2 in cells; MC degranulation altered various signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells, particularly, the induction of pro-inflammatory factors and consequential disruption of tight junctions. Importantly, the administration of clinical MC stabilizers for blocking degranulation dampened SARS-CoV-2-induced production of pro-inflammatory factors and prevented lung injury. These findings uncover a novel mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 initiating lung inflammation, and suggest an off-label use of MC stabilizer as immunomodulators for COVID-19 treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Degranulation , Lung Injury/metabolism , Mast Cells/metabolism , Pulmonary Alveoli/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Female , Humans , Lung Injury/genetics , Lung Injury/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Transgenic , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
5.
Carbohydr Polym ; 275: 118779, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466086

ABSTRACT

Previous researches suggested that polysaccharides from brown algae had anti-virus activity. We hypothesized that nature polysaccharide from marine plants might have the effect on anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity. By high throughput screening to target 3CLpro enzyme using polysaccharides library, we discover a crude polysaccharide 375 from seaweed Ecklonia kurome blocked 3CLpro enzymatic activity and shows good anti-SARS-CoV-2 infection activity in cell. Further, we show that homogeneous polysaccharide 37502 from the 375 may bind to 3CLpro well and disturb spike protein binding to ACE2 receptor. The structure characterization uncovers that 37502 is alginate. These results imply that the bioactivities of 375 on SARS-CoV-2 may target multiple key molecules implicated in the virus infection and replication. The above results suggest that 375 may be a potential drug candidate against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Polysaccharides , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Seaweed/chemistry , Virus Internalization/drug effects
7.
PLoS Biol ; 19(5): e3001209, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219261

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) threatens global public health and economy unprecedentedly, requiring accelerating development of prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. Molecular understanding of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) would greatly help advance the development of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy, as well as the design of next generation recombinant vaccines. Here, we applied H2L2 transgenic mice encoding the human immunoglobulin variable regions, together with a state-of-the-art antibody discovery platform to immunize and isolate NAbs. From a large panel of isolated antibodies, 25 antibodies showed potent neutralizing activities at sub-nanomolar levels by engaging the spike receptor-binding domain (RBD). Importantly, one human NAb, termed PR1077, from the H2L2 platform and 2 humanized NAb, including PR953 and PR961, were further characterized and subjected for subsequent structural analysis. High-resolution X-ray crystallography structures unveiled novel epitopes on the receptor-binding motif (RBM) for PR1077 and PR953, which directly compete with human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) for binding, and a novel non-blocking epitope on the neighboring site near RBM for PR961. Moreover, we further tested the antiviral efficiency of PR1077 in the Ad5-hACE2 transduction mouse model of COVID-19. A single injection provided potent protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in either prophylactic or treatment groups. Taken together, these results shed light on the development of mAb-related therapeutic interventions for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/ultrastructure , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
9.
Innovation (N Y) ; 2(1): 100071, 2021 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978457

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak has already become a global pandemic and containing this rapid worldwide transmission is of great challenge. The impacts of temperature and humidity on the COVID-19 transmission rate are still under discussion. Here, we elucidated these relationships by utilizing two unique scenarios, repeated measurement and natural experiment, using the COVID-19 cases reported from January 23 - February 21, 2020, in China. The modeling results revealed that higher temperature was most strongly associated with decreased COVID-19 transmission at a lag time of 8 days. Relative humidity (RH) appeared to have only a slight effect. These findings were verified by assessing SARS-CoV-2 infectivity under the relevant conditions of temperature (4°C-37°C) and RH (> 40%). We concluded that temperature increase made an important, but not determined, contribution to restrain the COVID-19 outbreak in China. It suggests that the emphasis of other effective controlling polices should be strictly implemented to restrain COVID-19 transmission in cold seasons.

10.
Protein Cell ; 12(9): 717-733, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-973695

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is spread primary via respiratory droplets and infects the lungs. Currently widely used cell lines and animals are unable to accurately mimic human physiological conditions because of the abnormal status of cell lines (transformed or cancer cells) and species differences between animals and humans. Organoids are stem cell-derived self-organized three-dimensional culture in vitro and model the physiological conditions of natural organs. Here we showed that SARS-CoV-2 infected and extensively replicated in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)-derived lung organoids, including airway and alveolar organoids which covered the complete infection and spread route for SARS-CoV-2 within lungs. The infected cells were ciliated, club, and alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells, which were sequentially located from the proximal to the distal airway and terminal alveoli, respectively. Additionally, RNA-seq revealed early cell response to virus infection including an unexpected downregulation of the metabolic processes, especially lipid metabolism, in addition to the well-known upregulation of immune response. Further, Remdesivir and a human neutralizing antibody potently inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication in lung organoids. Therefore, human lung organoids can serve as a pathophysiological model to investigate the underlying mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection and to discover and test therapeutic drugs for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Down-Regulation , Drug Discovery , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism , Humans , Immunity , Lipid Metabolism , Lung/cytology , Lung/virology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 561674, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-945686

ABSTRACT

Background: The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) resulted in grave morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is currently no effective drug to cure COVID-19. Based on analyses of available data, we deduced that excessive prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 was a key pathological event of COVID-19. Methods: A prospective clinical study was conducted in one hospital for COVID-19 treatment with Celebrex to suppress the excessive PGE2 production. A total of 44 COVID-19 cases were enrolled, 37 cases in the experimental group received Celebrex as adjuvant (full dose: 0.2 g, bid; half dose: 0.2 g, qd) for 7-14 days, and the dosage and duration was adjusted for individuals, while seven cases in the control group received the standard therapy. The clinical outcomes were evaluated by measuring the urine PGE2 levels, lab tests, CT scans, vital signs, and other clinical data. The urine PGE2 levels were measured by mass spectrometry. The study was registered and can be accessed at http://www.chictr.org.cn/showproj.aspx?proj=50474. Results: The concentrations of PGE2 in urine samples of COVID-19 patients were significantly higher than those of PGE2 in urine samples of healthy individuals (mean value: 170 ng/ml vs 18.8 ng/ml, p < 0.01) and positively correlated with the progression of COVID-19. Among those 37 experimental cases, there were 10 cases with age over 60 years (27%, 10/37) and 13 cases (35%, 13/37) with preexisting conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Twenty-five cases had full dose, 11 cases with half dose of Celebrex, and one case with ibuprofen. The remission rates in midterm were 100%, 82%, and 57% of the full dose, half dose, and control group, respectively, and the discharged rate was 100% at the endpoint with Celebrex treatment. Celebrex significantly reduced the PGE2 levels and promoted recovery of ordinary and severe COVID-19. Furthermore, more complications, severity, and death rate were widely observed and reported in the COVID-19 group of elders and with comorbidities; however, this phenomenon did not appear in this particular Celebrex adjunctive treatment study. Conclusion: This clinical study indicates that Celebrex adjuvant treatment promotes the recovery of all types of COVID-19 and further reduces the mortality rate of elderly and those with comorbidities.

12.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4207, 2020 08 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724410

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 greatly threatens global public health but no prophylactic vaccine is available. Here, we report the generation of a replication-incompetent recombinant serotype 5 adenovirus, Ad5-S-nb2, carrying a codon-optimized gene encoding Spike protein (S). In mice and rhesus macaques, intramuscular injection with Ad5-S-nb2 elicits systemic S-specific antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. Intranasal inoculation elicits both systemic and pulmonary antibody responses but weaker CMI response. At 30 days after a single vaccination with Ad5-S-nb2 either intramuscularly or intranasally, macaques are protected against SARS-CoV-2 challenge. A subsequent challenge reveals that macaques vaccinated with a 10-fold lower vaccine dosage (1 × 1010 viral particles) are also protected, demonstrating the effectiveness of Ad5-S-nb2 and the possibility of offering more vaccine dosages within a shorter timeframe. Thus, Ad5-S-nb2 is a promising candidate vaccine and warrants further clinical evaluation.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Adenoviridae/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Respiratory System/pathology , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
14.
Zool Res ; 41(3): 213-219, 2020 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210902

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by infection with human coronavirus 2019 (HCoV-19 / SARS-CoV-2 / 2019-nCoV), is a global threat to the human population. Here, we briefly summarize the available data for the zoonotic origins of HCoV-19, with reference to the other two epidemics of highly virulent coronaviruses, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, which cause severe pneumonia in humans. We propose to intensify future efforts for tracing the origins of HCoV-19, which is a very important scientific question for the control and prevention of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Zoonoses , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Reservoirs , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 991-993, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133551

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 caused a major outbreak of severe pneumonia (COVID-19) in humans. Viral RNA was detected in multiple organs in COVID-19 patients. However, infectious SARS-CoV-2 was only isolated from respiratory specimens. Here, infectious SARS-CoV-2 was successfully isolated from urine of a COVID-19 patient. The virus isolated could infect new susceptible cells and was recognized by its' own patient sera. Appropriate precautions should be taken to avoid transmission from urine.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/urine , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/urine , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Aged , Animals , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Vero Cells
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