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1.
EBioMedicine ; 80: 104077, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867076

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe COVID-19 is associated with a high circulating level of calprotectin, the S100A8/S100A9 alarmin heterodimer. Baseline calprotectin amount measured in peripheral blood at diagnosis correlates with disease severity. The optimal use of this biomarker along COVID-19 course remains to be delineated. METHODS: We focused on patients with a WHO-defined moderate COVID-19 requiring hospitalization in a medical ward. We collected plasma and serum from three independent cohorts (N = 626 patients) and measured calprotectin amount at admission. We performed longitudinal measures of calprotectin in 457 of these patients (1461 samples) and used a joint latent class mixture model in which classes were defined by age, body mass index and comorbidities to identify calprotectin trajectories predicting the risk of transfer into an intensive care unit or death. FINDINGS: After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index and comorbidities, the predictive value of baseline calprotectin in patients with moderate COVID19 could be refined by serial monitoring of the biomarker. We discriminated three calprotectin trajectories associated with low, moderate, and high risk of poor outcome, and we designed an algorithm available as online software (https://calpla.gustaveroussy.fr:8443/) to monitor the probability of a poor outcome in individual patients with moderate COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: These results emphasize the clinical interest of serial monitoring of calprotectin amount in the peripheral blood to anticipate the risk of poor outcomes in patients with moderate COVID-19 hospitalized in a standard care unit. FUNDING: The study received support (research grants) from ThermoFisher immunodiagnostics (France) and Gustave Roussy Foundation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , France , Humans , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Vieillard-Baron, Antoine, Flicoteaux, Rémi, Salmona, Maud, Annane, Djillali, Ayed, Soufia, Azoulay, Elie, Bellaiche, Raphael, Beloucif, Sadek, Berti, Enora, Bertier, Astrid, Besset, Sébastien, Bret, Marlène, Cariou, Alain, Carpentier, Christophe, Chaouch, Oussama, Chariot, Appoline, Charron, Cyril, Charpentier, Julien, Cheurfa, Cherifa, Cholley, Bernard, Clerc, Sébastien, Combes, Alain, Chousterman, Benjamin, Cohen, Yves, Constantin, Jean-Michel, Damoisel, Charles, Darmon, Michael, Degos, Vincent, D’Ableiges, Bertrand De Maupeou, Demeret, Sophie, Montmollin, Etienne De, Demoule, Alexandre, Depret, Francois, Diehl, Jean-Luc, Djibré, Michel, Do, Chung-Hi, Dudoignon, Emmanuel, Duranteau, Jacques, Fartoukh, Muriel, Fieux, Fabienne, Gayat, Etienne, Gennequin, Mael, Guidet, Bertrand, Gutton, Christophe, Hamada, Sophie, Heming, Nicholas, Jouffroy, Romain, Keita-Meyer, Hawa, Langeron, Olivier, Lortat-Jacob, Brice, Marey, Jonathan, Mebazaa, Alexandre, Megarbane, Bruno, Mekontso-Dessap, Armand, Mira, Jean-Paul, Molle, Julie, Mongardon, Nicolas, Montravers, Philippe, Morelot-Panzini, Capucine, Nemlaghi, Safaa, Nguyen, Bao-long, Parrot, Antoine, Pasqualotto, Romain, Peron, Nicolas, Picard, Lucile, de Chambrun, Marc Pineton, Planquette, Benjamin, Plaud, Benoit, Pons, Stéphanie, Quesnel, Christophe, Raphalen, Jean-Herlé, Razazi, Keyvan, Ricard, Jean-Damien, Roche, Anne, Rohaut, Benjamin, Roux, Damien, Savale, Laurent, Sobotka, Jennifer, Teboul, Jean-Louis, Timsit, Jean-François, Voiriot, Guillaume, Weiss, Emmanuel, Wildenberg, Lucille, Zogheib, Elie, Riou, Bruno, Batteux, Frédéric.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327150

ABSTRACT

Importance Information about the severity of Omicron is scarce. Objective To report the respective risk of ICU admission in patients hospitalized with Delta and Omicron variants and to compare the characteristics and disease severity of critically ill patients infected with both variants according to vaccination status. Design Analysis from the APHP database, called Reality, prospectively recording the following information in consecutive patients admitted in the ICU for COVID-19: age, sex, immunosuppression, vaccination, pneumonia, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, time between symptom onset and ICU admission, and in-ICU mortality. Retrospective analysis on an administrative database, “Système d’Information pour le Suivi des Victimes” (SI-VIC), which lists hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Setting 39 hospitals in the Paris area from APHP group. Participants Patients hospitalized from December 1, 2021 to January 18, 2022 for COVID-19. Main outcomes and measures Risk of ICU admission was evaluated in 3761 patients and Omicron cases were compared to Delta cases in the ICU in 888 consecutive patients. Results On January 18, 45% of patients in the ICU and 63.8% of patients in conventional hospital units were infected with the Omicron variant (p < 0.001). The risk of ICU admission with Omicron was reduced by 64% than with Delta (9.3% versus 25.8% of cases, respectively, p < 0.001). In critically ill patients, 400 had the Delta variant, 229 the Omicron variant, 98 had an uninformative variant screening test and 161 did not have information on variant screening test. 747 patients (84.1%) were admitted for pneumonia. Compared to patients infected with Delta, Omicron patients were more vaccinated (p<0.001), even with 3 doses, more immunocompromised (p<0.001), less admitted for pneumonia (p<0.001), especially when vaccinated (62.1% in vaccinated versus 80.7% in unvaccinated, p<0.001), and less invasively ventilated (p=0.02). Similar results were found in the subgroup of pneumonia but Omicron cases were older. Unadjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ between Omicron and Delta cases, neither in the overall population (20.0% versus 27.9%, p = 0.08), nor in patients with pneumonia (31.6% versus 29.7%, respectively) where adjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ according to the variant (HR 1.43 95%CI [0.89;2.29], p=0.14). Conclusion and relevance Compared to the Delta variant, the Omicron variant is less likely to result in ICU admission and less likely to be associated with pneumonia. However, when patients with the Omicron variant are admitted for pneumonia, the severity seems similar to that of patients with the Delta variant, with more immunocompromised and vaccinated patients and no difference in adjusted in-ICU mortality. Further studies are needed to confirm our results.

3.
ERJ Open Res ; 7(4)2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496134

ABSTRACT

Parenchymal bands and ground-glass opacities consistent with a pattern of late organising pneumonia are frequently observed 6 months after ICU admission for #COVID19, whereas fibrotic changes of limited extent are only observed in about 1/3 of patients https://bit.ly/2UGOsbr.

4.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(11): 1976-1985, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical relevance of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) in COVID-19 is controversial. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence and prognostic value of conventional and nonconventional aPLs in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: This was a multicenter, prospective observational study in a French cohort of patients hospitalized with suspected COVID-19. RESULTS: Two hundred forty-nine patients were hospitalized with suspected COVID-19, in whom COVID-19 was confirmed in 154 and not confirmed in 95. We found a significant increase in lupus anticoagulant (LAC) positivity among patients with COVID-19 compared to patients without COVID-19 (60.9% versus 23.7%; P < 0.001), while prevalence of conventional aPLs (IgG and IgM anti-ß2 -glycoprotein I and IgG and IgM anticardiolipin isotypes) and nonconventional aPLs (IgA isotype of anticardiolipin, IgA isotype of anti-ß2 -glycoprotein I, IgG and IgM isotypes of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin, and IgG and IgM isotypes of antiprothrombin) was low in both groups. Patients with COVID-19 who were positive for LAC, as compared to patients with COVID-19 who were negative for LAC, had higher levels of fibrinogen (median 6.0 gm/liter [interquartile range 5.0-7.0] versus 5.3 gm/liter [interquartile range 4.3-6.4]; P = 0.028) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (median 115.5 mg/liter [interquartile range 66.0-204.8] versus 91.8 mg/liter [interquartile range 27.0-155.1]; P = 0.019). Univariate analysis did not show any association between LAC positivity and higher risks of venous thromboembolism (VTE) (odds ratio 1.02 [95% confidence interval 0.44-2.43], P = 0.95) or in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.80 [95% confidence interval 0.70-5.05], P = 0.24). With and without adjustment for CRP level, age, and sex, Kaplan-Meier survival curves according to LAC positivity confirmed the absence of an association with VTE or in-hospital mortality (unadjusted P = 0.64 and P = 0.26, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio 1.13 [95% confidence interval 0.48-2.60] and 1.80 [95% confidence interval 0.67-5.01], respectively). CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 have an increased prevalence of LAC positivity associated with biologic markers of inflammation. However, LAC positivity at the time of hospital admission is not associated with VTE risk and/or in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate , Venous Thromboembolism/blood
5.
J Thromb Haemost ; 19(7): 1823-1830, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease associated with vascular inflammation and endothelial injury. OBJECTIVES: To correlate circulating angiogenic markers vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), placental growth factor (PlGF), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) to in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 adult patients. METHODS: Consecutive ambulatory and hospitalized patients with COVID-19 infection were enrolled. VEGF-A, PlGF, and FGF-2 were measured in each patient ≤48 h following admission. RESULTS: The study enrolled 237 patients with suspected COVID-19: 208 patients had a positive diagnostic for COVID-19, of whom 23 were mild outpatients and 185 patients hospitalized after admission. Levels of VEGF-A, PlGF, and FGF-2 significantly increase with the severity of the disease (P < .001). Using a logistic regression model, we found a significant association between the increase of FGF-2 or PlGF and mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI; 1.07-1.16], P < .001 for FGF-2 and OR 1.07 95% CI [1.04-1.10], P < .001 for PlGF) while no association were found for VEGF-A levels. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed and we identified PlGF above 30 pg/ml as the best predictor of in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. Survival analysis for PlGF confirmed its interest for in-hospital mortality prediction, by using a Kaplan-Meier survival curve (P = .001) and a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted to age, body mass index, D-dimer, and C-reactive protein (3.23 95% CI [1.29-8.11], P = .001). CONCLUSION: Angiogenic factor PlGF is a relevant predictive factor for in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. More than a biomarker, we hypothesize that PlGF blocking strategies could be a new interesting therapeutic approach in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A , Adult , Biomarkers , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Placenta Growth Factor , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Angiogenesis ; 24(3): 505-517, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease associated with endotheliitis and microthrombosis. OBJECTIVES: To correlate endothelial dysfunction to in-hospital mortality in a bi-centric cohort of COVID-19 adult patients. METHODS: Consecutive ambulatory and hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled. A panel of endothelial biomarkers and von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers were measured in each patient ≤ 48 h following admission. RESULTS: Study enrolled 208 COVID-19 patients of whom 23 were mild outpatients and 189 patients hospitalized after admission. Most of endothelial biomarkers tested were found increased in the 89 critical patients transferred to intensive care unit. However, only von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) scaled according to clinical severity, with levels significantly higher in critical patients (median 507%, IQR 428-596) compared to non-critical patients (288%, 230-350, p < 0.0001) or COVID-19 outpatients (144%, 133-198, p = 0.007). Moreover, VWF high molecular weight multimers (HMWM) were significantly higher in critical patients (median ratio 1.18, IQR 0.86-1.09) compared to non-critical patients (0.96, 1.04-1.39, p < 0.001). Among all endothelial biomarkers measured, ROC curve analysis identified a VWF:Ag cut-off of 423% as the best predictor for in-hospital mortality. The accuracy of VWF:Ag was further confirmed in a Kaplan-Meier estimator analysis and a Cox proportional Hazard model adjusted on age, BMI, C-reactive protein and D-dimer levels. CONCLUSION: VWF:Ag is a relevant predictive factor for in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. More than a biomarker, we hypothesize that VWF, including excess of HMWM forms, drives microthrombosis in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/chemistry , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Weight , Paris/epidemiology , Proportional Hazards Models , Protein Multimerization , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology , von Willebrand Factor/chemistry
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