Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
2.
J Clin Med ; 11(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116073

ABSTRACT

Multiple vaccines are now being used across the world, and several studies have described cases of corneal graft rejection following the administration of the COVID-19 vaccine. The purpose of this article is to review the corneal adverse event that occurred following COVID-19 vaccine administration. The literature search was conducted in March 2022 using MEDLINE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A total of 27 articles, including 37 cases, have documented corneal adverse events that occurred following COVID-19 vaccination. The mean age was 60 ± 14.9 years (range, 27-83 years). The most common events were acute corneal graft rejection (n = 21, 56.8%), followed by herpes zoster ophthalmicus (n = 11, 29.7%) and herpes simplex keratitis (n = 2, 5.4%). The mean time from vaccination to the event was 10 ± 8.5 days (range, 1-42 days) after the first or second dose of vaccine. All patients with corneal graft rejection, immune-mediated keratolysis, and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) (n = 24, 64.9%) were managed topically with or without oral corticosteroids. Patients with herpes zoster ophthalmicus and herpes simplex keratitis were managed with oral antiviral agents. Two patients received penetrating keratoplasty due to keratolysis after invalid topical treatment. Disease resolution was noted in 29 patients (78.3%), whereas 3 (8.1%) had persistent corneal edema after graft rejection, 1 (2.7%) had corneal infiltration after HZO, and 4 (10.8%) were not mentioned in the articles. Corneal adverse events could occur after COVID-19 vaccination. After timely treatment with steroids or antiviral agents, most of the events were mild and had a good visual outcome. Administrating or increasing steroids before vaccination may be useful for the prevention of corneal graft rejection. However, the prophylactic use of antiviral treatments in patients with a herpes viral infection history is not recommend.

3.
Soc Sci Med ; 314: 115403, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061886

ABSTRACT

While existing studies have reported and recognized country-of-origin effects on the intentions to vaccinate against COVID-19 among individual citizens in some countries, the causal mechanism behind such effects to inform public health policymakers remain unexplored. Adding up a quality cue explanation for such effects to the existing literature, the authors argue that individual consumers are less willing to get a vaccine designed and manufactured by a country with a significantly lower quality perception than other countries. A survey experiment that recruited a nationally representative sample of Taiwanese adults (n = 1951) between December 13, 2020 and January 11, 2021 was designed and conducted to test the argument. We find that all else equal, Taiwanese respondents were on average less likely to express stronger willingness to take a vaccine from China than from the US, Germany, and Taiwan. Furthermore, even when the intrinsic quality of the vaccine was held constant by the experimental design, respondents still had a significantly lower quality perception of the vaccine from China, both in terms of perceived protection and severe side effects. Further evidence from casual mediation analyses shows that about 33% and 11% of the total average causal effects of the "China" country-of-origin label on vaccine uptake intention were respectively mediated through the perceived efficacy of protection and perceived risk of experiencing severe side effects. We conclude that quality cue constitutes one of many casual mechanisms behind widely reported country-of-origin effects on intention to vaccinate against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Intention , Cues , Taiwan/epidemiology , Vaccination
4.
Cureus ; 13(9): e18390, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468731

ABSTRACT

Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is a rare complication after vaccination of Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine (AZD1222) or Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. It makes a rare complication of thrombosis at common and/or uncommon organs with thrombocytopenia after COVID-19 vaccination four to 28 days later and most patients were younger than 60 years of age. We reported the case of a 75-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who received regular hemodialysis. She received Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccination eight days ago and then she suffered from intermittent chest tightness and epigastric pain with tarry stool passage for two days. Severe thrombocytopenia with elevated D-dimer value was noted and computed tomography of the chest showed azygos vein thrombosis. Elevated cardiac enzyme with ST-T change in 12-lead electrocardiogram was also noted. For positive anti-platelet factor 4 antibodies, VITT with myocardial infarction and azygos vein thrombosis was diagnosed.

5.
J Dent Sci ; 16(4): 1281-1289, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392385

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Online learning has been used to continue dental education activities during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to compare the learning effectiveness between physical classroom and online class learning for dental education during the COVID-19 pandemic by the questionnaire survey. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire-based online survey was used to evaluate the learning effectiveness on the dental students who took the compulsory course entitled "oral pathology and diagnosis" in School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University in 2021. Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyze the difference in learning effectiveness between physical classroom and online class learning for dental education during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: In this study, dental students tended to have a viewpoint that the learning effectiveness of online class learning was better than that of physical classroom learning. On the contrary, they tended to have a viewpoint that the convenience and fairness of physical classroom examination was better than that of online examination (all P-values < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We conclude that our dental students are ready to take online courses. In terms of blended learning courses, the combination of physical classroom and online courses is the future trend of dental education. At this moment, dental schools must prepare their abilities for the implementation of online courses to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and the next crisis, as well as for the needs of future dental education.

6.
J Dent Sci ; 16(4): 1066-1073, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309278

ABSTRACT

Numerous oral manifestations of COVID-19 have been reported in the literatures. Common oral lesions in COVID-19 patients included ulcerations, xerostomia, dysgeusia, gingival inflammation, and erythema. Among them, oral ulceration is the most frequent finding and is present as various but distinct patterns. Thus, we conducted a comprehensive review of 51 COVID-19 patients with oral ulcerative lesions to further analyze the various oral ulcerative lesions in COVID-19 patients. There were a median age of 41.4 years and a slight female predilection in these patients. Most oral lesions manifested as an aphtha-like ulceration but lack of an evidence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Some of them were present as herpetiform ulcerations without HSV infection. Widespread ulcerations accompanied with necrosis were observed in the more severe and immunosuppressed older patients. Although some reported patients were asymptomatic, most of them had systemic symptoms concurring or slightly preceding the oral ulcerative lesions and the latency from the onset of systemic symptoms to oral ulcerative lesions were under 10 days, suggesting that oral ulceration was one of the early symptoms of COVID-19. Therefore, the oral ulcerative lesions may be considered as oral markers for early diagnosis of the underlying COVID-19 infection in the asymptomatic patients.

7.
J Dent Sci ; 16(4): 1204-1213, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164021

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The dentists are the high-risk group of infectious respiratory diseases during dental treatment. This study investigated the changes of the numbers of overall practicing dentists, dental clinics, and hospital dentists in Taiwan during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We collected the data of the numbers of overall practicing dentists, dental clinics, and hospital dentists in each city and county of Taiwan in October 2019, April 2020, and October 2020 for evaluating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the dentist manpower in Taiwan. RESULTS: After the COVID-19 outbreak, the total increased numbers of practicing dentists, dental clinics, and hospital dentists in Taiwan were 408, 14, and -16 from October 2019 to October 2020, respectively. In addition, their increased rates of the corresponding items were 2.76%, 0.21%, and -0.72%, respectively. The increased rate of practicing dentists from October 2019 to April 2020 was significantly higher than that of dental clinics (P < 0.001) and that of hospital dentists (P < 0.001). Moreover, the increased rate of practicing dentists from October 2019 to October 2020 was significantly higher than that of dental clinics (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the increased number of practicing dentists is not different from that in the past, but the increased numbers and rates of dental clinics and hospital dentists are lower than those in the past. This indicates that the willingness of dentists to open new dental clinics or work in hospitals reduces due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(33): 1139-1143, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724591

ABSTRACT

Preventing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in correctional and detention facilities* can be challenging because of population-dense housing, varied access to hygiene facilities and supplies, and limited space for isolation and quarantine (1). Incarcerated and detained populations have a high prevalence of chronic diseases, increasing their risk for severe COVID-19-associated illness and making early detection critical (2,3). Correctional and detention facilities are not closed systems; SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can be transmitted to and from the surrounding community through staff member and visitor movements as well as entry, transfer, and release of incarcerated and detained persons (1). To better understand SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in these settings, CDC requested data from 15 jurisdictions describing results of mass testing events among incarcerated and detained persons and cases identified through earlier symptom-based testing. Six jurisdictions reported SARS-CoV-2 prevalence of 0%-86.8% (median = 29.3%) from mass testing events in 16 adult facilities. Before mass testing, 15 of the 16 facilities had identified at least one COVID-19 case among incarcerated or detained persons using symptom-based testing, and mass testing increased the total number of known cases from 642 to 8,239. Case surveillance from symptom-based testing has likely underestimated SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in correctional and detention facilities. Broad-based testing can provide a more accurate assessment of prevalence and generate data to help control transmission (4).


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Mass Screening , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prisons , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Housing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Prevalence , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL