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1.
Ieee Transactions on Engineering Management ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2327740

ABSTRACT

Today, ride-hailing platform operations are popular. Facing pandemics (e.g., COVID-19) some customers feel unsafe for the ride-hailing service and possess a "safety risk-averse" (SRA) attitude. The proportion of this type of SRA customers is unfortunately unknown, which makes it difficult for the ride-hailing platform to decide its optimal service price. In this article, understanding that blockchain technology (BT) based systems can help improve market estimation for the proportion of SRA customers, we conduct a theoretical study to explore the impacts that the BT-based system can bring to the platform, customers, and drivers. We consider the case in which the platform is risk-averse (in profit) and serves a market with both SRA and non-SRA customers. We analytically prove that using BT, the optimal service price will be increased and BT is especially helpful for the case with a more risk-averse ride-hailing platform. However, whether it is more or less significant for the more risk-averse SRA customers depends on their degree of risk aversion. We uncover that when the use of BT is beneficial to the customers, it will also be beneficial to the drivers, and vice versa. We derive in closed-form the analytical conditions under which the use of BT can be beneficial to the ride-hailing platform, customers, and drivers (i.e., achieving "all-win"). When all-win cannot be achieved automatically, we explore how governments can provide sponsors to help. We further extend the analysis to consider the general case in which BT incurs both a fixed cost as well as a cost increasing in demand. We prove that the main conclusion remains robust. In addition, we reveal that the required amount of government sponsor to achieve all-win is the same between the two different costing models explored in this article.

2.
Production and Operations Management ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2293438

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic and other recent disruptions in the early 2020s led to sections in the business press blaming just-in-time (JIT) practices for operational failings. Consequently, there are calls for moving away from JIT toward holding more inventory as preparation against future disruptions, which is referred to as just-in-case. The academic community is also divided. Some scholars argue that JIT is not resilient, while others maintain that JIT can continue providing superior performance even with disruptions. Motivated by this debate, we discuss various misconceptions about JIT that underlie this debate. Furthermore, we present different ways to adapt JIT for turbulent environments and argue that companies can improve their supply chain performance if JIT supply chain segments are chosen fittingly—even more so—during disruptions. © 2023 The Authors. Production and Operations Management published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Production and Operations Management Society.

3.
Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2303288

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing disruptions to global supply chains have brought risk management to the fore. While guidance on risk management is proliferating, an area that is largely untapped is risk measurement. The pandemic has made us realize the criticality of risk measurement and the need to develop a culture of continuous measuring. Based on our interviews with purchasing and supply management (PSM) professionals about how they measure and manage risk, we offer a framework integrating how to rethink risk measurement, how to continuously measure risk, how to translate measurement into action, and how to establish a culture of continuous measuring. It captures a shift in mindset that is needed to truly take risk measurement to the next level. Once this is accomplished, it can help PSM professionals build more resilient supply chains. © 2023 Elsevier Ltd

4.
International Journal of Production Research ; 61(8):2402-2415, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2264160

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered new research areas in supply chain resilience. One of these new areas is viability. Viability extends the resilience understanding from performance-based assessment of firm's responses to disruptions towards survivability of both supply chains and associated ecosystems not only during some short-term disruptions but also under conditions of long-term crises. To explore the state-of-the-art knowledge on methods, models, capabilities, and technologies of supply chain viability, we edited this important IJPR special issue. To introduce the special issue, we review the existing literature on supply chain viability, conceptualise seven major pillars of supply chain viability theory (i.e. viable supply chain design, viability in process planning and control, ripple effect, intertwined and reconfigurable supply networks, ecosystems, digital supply chain, and Industry 5.0), and establish some associated future research directions. The findings of this editorial paper, as well as the articles in the special issue, can be used by researchers and practitioners alike to consolidate recent advances and practices of viability in supply chain networks and lay the solid foundation for further developments in this area. © 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

5.
Production and Operations Management ; 32(2):524-546, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246480

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has posed serious threats and challenges to global supply chain management (GSCM). To survive the crisis, it is critical to rethink the proper setting of global supply chains and reform many related operational strategies. We hence attempt to reform the GSCM from both supply and demand sides considering different pandemic stages (i.e., pre, during, and post-pandemic stages). In this research paper, we combine a careful literature review with real-world case studies to examine the impacts and specific challenges brought by the pandemic to global supply chains. We first classify the related literature from the demand and supply sides. Based on the insights obtained, we search publicly available information and report real practices of GSCM under COVID-19 in nine top global enterprises. To achieve responsiveness, resilience, and restoration (3Rs), we then propose the "GREAT-3Rs” framework, which shows the critical issues and measures for reforming GSCM under the three pandemic stages. In particular, the "GREAT” part of the framework includes five critical domains, namely, "government proactive policies and measures,” "redesigning global supply chains,” "economic and financing strategies under risk,” "adjustment of operations,” and "technology adoption,” to help global enterprises to survive the pandemic;"3Rs” are the outputs that can be achieved after using the "GREAT” strategies under the three pandemic stages. Finally, we establish a future research agenda from five aspects. © 2022 Production and Operations Management Society.

6.
European Journal of Operational Research ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2246788

ABSTRACT

Recently, an increasing number of companies have encountered random production disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we investigate a two-stage supply chain in which a retailer can order products from a low-price ("cheap”) unreliable supplier (who may be subject to an uncertain production disruption and partially deliver the order) and an "expensive” reliable supplier at Stage 1 and a more "expensive” backup supplier at Stage 2. If the disruption happens, only the products that were produced before the disruption time can be obtained from the unreliable supplier. It is found that in the case with imperfect demand information updating, the unreliable supplier is always used while the reliable supplier can be abandoned. The time-dependent supply property of the unreliable supplier reduces the retailer's willingness of adopting the dual sourcing strategy at Stage 1, compared with the scenario with all-or-nothing supply. Different from the case with imperfect demand information updating, either the reliable or unreliable supplier can be abandoned in the case with perfect demand information updating. We derive the optimal ordering decisions and the conditions where single sourcing or dual sourcing is adopted at Stage 1. We conduct numerical experiments motivated by the sourcing problem of 3M Company in the US during the COVID-19 and observe that the unreliable supplier is more preferable when the demand uncertainty before or after the emergency order is higher. Interestingly, the retailer tends to order more from the unreliable supplier when the production disruption probability is larger in some cases. © 2022 The Author(s)

7.
Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 18(Supplement 3):57-58, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2136591

ABSTRACT

Aims: Peoplewith cancer have increased morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19 infection. The influence of a person's cancer diagnosis on COVID-19 vaccine uptake is not well understood. We undertook an in-depth exploration of factors influencing COVID-19 vaccine uptake among those with cancer. Method(s): Adults with cancer were recruited from nine Australian health services to undertake a cross-sectional online survey (June to October, 2021) covering COVID-19 vaccine uptake, vaccine hesitancy, confidence and complacency, and disease-related decision-making impact. Free-text responses were invited regarding thoughts and feelings about the interaction between the participant's cancer,COVID-19, and vaccination. Qualitative thematic analysiswas undertaken using an iterative process with representative verbatim quotes to illustrate the themes. Result(s): Of 3560 survey responses, 1248 (35.1%, mean age 62.7 (SD 11.8) years, 58.5% female) provided free-text comments for qualitative analysis. Participants who provided free-text comments were significantly less likely to have received a COVID-19 vaccination, compared to those who did not comment (31.4% and 68.6%, respectively). Five key themes were identified from qualitative analysis: (1) having a chronic illness heightened both perceived susceptibility to and severity ofCOVID-19;(2) disruption of cancer managementwas a significant perceived barrier to vaccination;(3) paucity of evidence on COVID-19 vaccine safety (for people with their cancer) compromised the perceived benefits;(4) fear of the unknown greatly reduced motivation to vaccine uptake and (5) many were left confused about COVID-19 and the vaccine. Conclusion(s): This analysis highlights the additional layer of complexity related to COVID-19 vaccination decision-making in people with cancer. An appreciation of higher susceptibility to severe COVID-19 outcomes is balanced against uncertain impact of the vaccine on disease progression and management. Clinician consultation that can address individualized concerns related to the person's cancer and treatments is important to alleviate concerns and maximize COVID-19 vaccine uptake in people with cancer.

8.
Springer Series in Supply Chain Management ; 21:113-132, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2128440

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has interrupted firms and their value networks. The lockdown measures taken by governments around the globe have triggered a massive supply and demand shock. The ensuing crisis has created economic chaos that resulted in massive business disruptions for companies, their customers, their suppliers, and their affiliated service providers (banks and logistics providers). Firms are turning to supply chain financing solutions to stabilize liquidity and their net working capital to maintain solvency and ensure continuity of supply through their supply chains. This paper discloses several different types of supply chain financing solutions and how these can impact firms and their value creation partners struggling through the uncertain business environment caused by a global pandemic. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

9.
IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management ; : 1-15, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2107855

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has created disruptions and risks in global supply chains. Big data analytics (BDA) has emerged in recent years as a potential solution for provisioning predictive and pre-emptive information to companies in order to preplan and mitigate the impacts of such risks. The focus of this article is to gain insights into how BDA can help companies combat a crisis like COVID-19 via a multimethodological scientific study. The advent of a crisis like COVID-19 brings with it uncertainties, and information processing theory (IPT) provides a perspective on the ways to deal with such uncertainties. We use IPT, in conjunction with the Crisis Management Theory, to lay the foundation of the article. After establishing the theoretical basis, we conduct two surveys towards supply chain managers, one before and one after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. We follow it up with qualitative interviews to gain further insights. The application of multiple methods helps ensure the triangulation of results and, hence, enhances the research rigor. Our research finds that although the current adoption of BDA in the Indian industry has not grown to a statistically significant level, there are serious future plans for the industry to adopt BDA for crisis management. The interviews also highlight the current status of adoption and the growth of BDA in the Indian industry. The article interestingly identifies that the traditional barriers to implementing new technologies (like BDA for crisis management) are no longer present in the current times. The COVID-19 pandemic has hence accelerated technology adoption and at the same time uncovered some BDA implementation challenges in practice (e.g., a lack of data scientists). IEEE

10.
Journal of Business Research ; 153:115-127, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2069263

ABSTRACT

Commercial sharing services (CSSs) provide consumers with temporary access to products or services. Consumers can use CSSs to communicate an identity by renting products from specific brands. Applying the theory of the extended self, we proposed an attachment-based account of CSS usage. Across four studies, we found consistent evidence that consumers were less likely to rent the products of their strongly attached brands via CSSs because these brands were regarded as part of their extended selves, and thus sharing these products with others would contaminate the self. However, this effect was mitigated when consumers' psychological ownership of the shared product was augmented. Our findings reveal that psychological ownership can replace the role of actual ownership in the sharing context, rendering profound implications for understanding the relationships among self, brand, and product in sharing services.

11.
IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management ; : 1-14, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1992678

ABSTRACT

Understanding the resilience capabilities of restaurant operations and the determinants affecting these capabilities is critical to helping restaurants overcome the hardships owing to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. This article adopts a textual analytics approach to scientifically measure consumption trends and identify the shock to restaurant sales using online customer review data from Dianping.com (an O2O platform in China). Moreover, the article proposes a theoretical model of business resilience for the restaurant industry in the context of the pandemic. Then, an empirical investigation on how the determinants in our theoretical framework affect the resilience of restaurant business operations using the panel logit model is conducted. Our findings indicate that the pandemic has severely disrupted the full-service restaurants as compared to the quick-service restaurants. We identify four determinants of resilience, namely social capital (i.e., restaurant rating), physical capital (i.e., contactless service), economic capital (i.e., chain operation), and natural capital (e.g., location), which are significantly associated with the resilience of restaurant business during the pandemic. These four determinants play different roles in the resilience of full-service and quick-service restaurants. The findings of this study have theoretical contribution and generate some important managerial implications for helping the restaurant industry recover from disruptions brought by the COVID-19 pandemic. IEEE

12.
IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1752446

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to shutdowns of myriad factories, resulting in extreme scarce production capacity and disruptions of supply chains. Many manufacturing firms around the world struggle to ramp up their production capacity to mitigate the negative impact of the pandemic. We adopt a multimethodological approach to examine the impacts of cross-industry production (CIP) on supply chains and society. First, we provide evidence of CIP of personal and protective equipment (PPE), including CIP's business model, CIP in real-world practice, and the global supply chain of PPE by collecting public organizational data. Second, we confirm the importance of CIP and its beneficial impacts on brand value and society by conducting statistical tests and analyses. Third, we propose a framework of CIP implementation from the perspectives of firms and governments. Finally, we conduct real-world case studies to illustrate the framework of CIP. We find that CIP in pandemic time can significantly increase capacity to tens or even thousands of times of normal capacity in a short period, which can enhance firms’brand values and profiles and improve their social impacts and benefits. We provide managerial insights and guidance to firms with potential CIP capability and governments in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. IEEE

13.
Ieee Transactions on Engineering Management ; : 14, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1583752

ABSTRACT

This article empirically examines the effect of big data analytics (BDA) on healthcare supply chain (HSC) innovation, supply chain responsiveness, and supply chain resilience under the moderating effect of innovation leadership in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The scanning interpretation-action-performance model and organization information processing theory are used to explain BDA, HSC innovation, responsiveness, and resilience relationships. First, the hypotheses were tested using data collected from 190 experienced respondents working in the healthcare industry. Our structural equation modeling analysis using the partial least squares (PLS) method revealed that BDA capabilities play a pivotal role in building a responsive HSC and improving innovation, which has contributed to resilience during the current pandemic situation. High innovation leadership strengthens the effect of BDA capabilities on HSC innovation. High innovation leadership also increases the effect of BDA capabilities on responsiveness. Second, we validated and supplemented the empirical research findings using inputs collected in 30 semistructured qualitative questionnaires. Our article makes a unique contribution from the perspective of innovation leaderships. In particular, we argue that the role of innovative leadership in the COVID-19 pandemic situation is critical as it indirectly affects HSC resilience when BDA is in place.

14.
Annals of Emergency Medicine ; 78(2):S34-S35, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1351511

ABSTRACT

Study Objectives: The new coronavirus that emerged in Wuhan, China was declared a global pandemic in March 2020 sparking a worldwide effort to find a vaccine that could effectively prevent continued spread of the virus. The Gallup’s tracking poll findings from 9/16/2020 to 9/29/2020 showed that 63% of Americans would be agreeable to being vaccinated if an FDA-approved vaccine were available to them at no cost. A survey conducted in France from March to July 2020 to determine COVID-19 vaccine acceptance specifically amongst health care workers (HCW) revealed that 75% of their HCWs intended to be vaccinated. Our literature search however did not yield studies assessing the acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine amongst HCWs, specifically in the United States. The aim of this study was to determine COVID-19 vaccination rates amongst HCWs within a single hospital, any differences between HCWs acceptability of the vaccine, and which factors were most important in their decision-making. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study of HCWs at Ascension Macomb-Oakland Hospital was conducted in February 2021 – March 2021 soon after vaccines became available at the hospital. A SurveyMonkey was mass-distributed by email to HCWs including doctors, nurses, administrators, pharmacists, technicians, and secretaries. Any HCW that was over the age of 18 years of age was eligible to participate. A series of 15 questions were asked in a multiple choice and scale format. Result: A total of 574 out of the ∼2900 HCWs completed the survey. Of these, 487 (84.8%) either accepted or intended to get vaccinated within the next 3 months. 62 (10.8%) would decline the vaccine over the next 3 months and 25 (4.4%) remained undecided. The mean age of respondents was 45. The majority of surveys were completed by females (75.7%). The mean age of HCWs willing to accept the vaccine was greater compared to those who declined the vaccine (40 years of age vs 46 years of age). There was a higher proportion of Democrats willing to accept the vaccine than those who declined the vaccine (27% vs 9.8%). The most important factors for those that decided to take the vaccine were protection of their own health;protection of health of patients, family, or friends;and trust in the science. The most important factors in those that either declined or were undecided about the vaccine were concern for safety profile and side effects of vaccine, uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of the vaccine, and the accelerated development of the vaccine. Conclusions: As one of the nation’s hotspots for the highest rates of positive COVID-19 cases and deaths, a survey to assess acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine showed that a majority of HCWs had either taken or planned to take the vaccine. HCWs background in science and the proximity and frequency in which they work with COVID-19+ patients were felt to account for the difference in vaccination rates between the general public and HCWs.

15.
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry ; 13(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1214756

ABSTRACT

Hikikomori was first reported in Japan, but is a worldwide phenomenon that occurs not only in Asian cultures such as South Korea, India, Hong Kong, and China, but also in Australia, Europe (Spain, France, Italy), the United States, and Canada. Hikikomori is considered to be closely related to culture, and attention is now being paid to how the Hikikomori phenomenon is appearing and what characteristics are different in various different cultures. In addition to research on Hikikomori support and treatment models suitable for each country's situation, it is necessary to establish a common evaluation tool and compare the characteristics of psychopathology. The research on Korean Hikikomori (Oiettolie) began around 2001, and various studies have been conducted to date. Major research achievements in Korea so far include discovering the effectiveness of the Home visitation program and comparing the characteristics of Hikikomori outside Japan through international cooperation research. Currently, COVID-19 is expected to increase the Hikikomori phenomenon worldwide, and it has not been known what will change the Hikikomori phenomenon due to the quarantine policy or cultural characteristics of each country. It is expected that the understanding of the Hikikomori phenomenon will be improved through international cooperation research in the future. The recently planned Korea-Japan collaborative research can be a good example of such international research.

16.
Rutgers Business Review ; 6(1):1-23, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1208128

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 crisis has interrupted firms and their value networks. The lockdown measures taken by governments around the globe have triggered a massive supply and demand shock. The ensuing crisis has created economic chaos that resulted in massive business disruptions for companies, their customers, their suppliers and their affiliated service providers (banks and logistics providers). Firms are turning to supply chain financing solutions to stabilize liquidity and their net working capital to maintain solvency and ensure continuity of supply through their supply chains. This paper discloses several different types of supply chain financing solutions and how these can impact firms and their value creation partners struggling through the uncertain business environment caused by a global pandemic. © 2021, Rutgers Business School. All rights reserved.

17.
International Journal of Comparative Education and Development ; 2021.
Article | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1112137

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Without universal access to a Covid-19 vaccine, many countries seek to prevent coronavirus outbreaks by closing schools and having students learn remotely. This study aims to examine its challenges for linguistic minority (LM) students and some practical strategies – both generally for all students and specifically for LM students. Design/methodology/approach: This study synthesises the research literature and practices across countries on equity and remote learning. It helps (1) understand the differential difficulties during an epidemic across primary, secondary and tertiary school students, especially LM students from low socioeconomic status (SES) families who lack economic, human, cultural or social capital in family or school contexts, based on Bourdieu's theory, and (2) identify additional resources and flexible, creative solutions for improving access and learning conditions for LM students. The authors discuss examples from 13 countries and territories (including developed and developing economies) of transformations of in-class learning to online learning in part or whole. Findings: The limited economic, cultural and social capital of LM students, especially from low SES families, and their schools, along with communication barriers hinder their remote learning. Crisis-induced school budget shortfalls require creative ways to transition teachers, students and parents to remote learning and to provide customised support for LM students. Schools can (1) partner with non-governmental organisations, religious organisations, businesses and government services to access/share remote learning resources for LM students;(2) help teachers, students and parents develop needed skills (via online systems, peer support groups and hotlines);(3) restructure teacher lessons and duties for remote teaching;and (4) capitalise on technology (e.g. texts, chats, whiteboards) to support LM students' remote learning – some of which can exceed their traditional face-to-face learning experiences. Originality/value: This article is among the first to examine how the Covid-19 crisis disproportionately affects the remote learning of LM students, to specify effective, practical remedies and to inform suitable education and social policies across countries. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

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