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1.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the current study was to determine if treatment with senicapoc, improves the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio in patients with COVID-19 and severe respiratory insufficiency. METHODS: Investigator-initiated, randomized, open-label, phase II trial in four intensive care units (ICU) in Denmark. We included patients aged ≥18 years and admitted to an ICU with severe respiratory insufficiency due to COVID-19. The intervention consisted of 50 mg enteral senicapoc administered as soon as possible after randomization and again after 24 hours. Patients in the control group received standard care only. The primary outcome was the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio at 72 hours. RESULTS: Twenty patients were randomized to senicapoc and 26 patients to standard care. Important differences existed in patient characteristics at baseline, including more patients being on non-invasive/invasive ventilation in the control group (54% vs. 35%). The median senicapoc concentration at 72 hours was 62.1 ng/mL (IQR 46.7-71.2). The primary outcome, PaO2 /FiO2 ratio at 72 hours, was significantly lower in the senicapoc group (mean 19.5 kPa, SD 6.6) than in the control group (mean 24.4 kPa, SD 9.2) (mean difference - 5.1 kPa [95%CI -10.2, -0.04] p = 0.05). The 28-day mortality in the senicapoc group was 2/20 (10%) compared with 6/26 (23%) in the control group (OR 0.36 95%CI 0.06-2.07, p = 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with senicapoc resulted in a significantly lower PaO2 /FiO2 ratio at 72 hours with no differences for other outcomes.

3.
Semin Thromb Hemost ; 48(1): 31-54, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493298

ABSTRACT

Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the infectious pathology caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, have a high risk of thrombosis, though the precise mechanisms behind this remain unclarified. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE identified 18 prospective studies applying dynamic coagulation assays in ICU COVID-19 patients. Overall, these studies revealed normal or slightly reduced primary hemostasis, prolonged clot initiation, but increased clot firmness. Thrombin generation assay parameters generally were equivalent to the control groups or within reference range. Fibrinolysis assays showed increased clot resistance. Only six studies related their findings to clinical outcome. We also prospectively included 51 COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Blood samples were examined on day 1, 3-4, and 7-8 with platelet function tests, rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), in vivo and ex vivo thrombin generation, and clot lysis assay. Data on thrombosis, bleeding, and mortality were recorded during 30 days. Primary hemostasis was comparable to healthy controls, but COVID-19 patients had longer ROTEM-clotting times and higher maximum clot firmness than healthy controls. Ex vivo thrombin generation was similar to that of healthy controls while in vivo thrombin generation markers, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex, and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) were higher in ICU COVID-19 patients than in healthy controls. Impaired fibrinolysis was present at all time points. TAT complex and F1 + 2 levels were significantly higher in patients developing thrombosis (n = 16) than in those without. In conclusion, only few previous studies employed dynamic hemostasis assays in COVID-19 ICU-patients and failed to reveal a clear association with development of thrombosis. In ICU COVID-19 patients, we confirmed normal platelet aggregation, while in vivo thrombin generation was increased and fibrinolysis decreased. Thrombosis may be driven by increased thrombin formation in vivo.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Blood Coagulation Tests , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Fibrinolysis , Hemostasis , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombelastography , Thrombin
4.
Eur Respir J ; 59(4)2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immunosuppression may worsen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We conducted a nationwide cohort study of the effect of exposure to immunosuppressants on the prognosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Denmark. METHODS: We identified all SARS-CoV-2 test-positive patients from February 2020 to October 2020 and linked healthcare data from nationwide registers, including prescriptions for the exposure (immunosuppressant drugs). We estimated relative risks of hospital admission, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death (each studied independently up to 30 days from testing) with a log-linear binomial regression adjusted for confounders using a propensity score-based matching weights model. RESULTS: A composite immunosuppressant exposure was associated with a significantly increased risk of death (adjusted relative risk 1.56 (95% CI 1.10-2.22)). The increased risk of death was mainly driven by exposure to systemic glucocorticoids (adjusted relative risk 2.38 (95% CI 1.72-3.30)), which were also associated with an increased risk of hospital admission (adjusted relative risk 1.34 (95% CI 1.10-1.62)), but not of ICU admission (adjusted relative risk 1.76 (95% CI 0.93-3.35)); these risks were greater for high cumulative doses of glucocorticoids than for moderate doses. Exposure to selective immunosuppressants, tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or interleukin inhibitors was not associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation, ICU admission or death, nor was exposure to calcineurin inhibitors, other immunosuppressants, hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to glucocorticoids was associated with increased risks of hospital admission and death. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with pre-morbid glucocorticoid usage, specifically whether these patients require altered doses of glucocorticoids.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Glucocorticoids , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Intensive Care Units , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 65(9): 1345-1350, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280261

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Superinfection following viral infection is a known complication, which may lead to longer hospitalisation and worse outcome. Empirical antibiotic therapy may prevent bacterial superinfections, but may also lead to overuse, adverse effects and development of resistant pathogens. Knowledge about the incidence of superinfections in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is limited. METHODS: We will conduct a nationwide cohort study comparing the incidence of superinfections in patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to the ICU compared with ICU patients with influenza A/B in Denmark. We will include approximately 1000 patients in each group from the time period of 1 October 2014 to 30 April 2019 and from 10 March 2020 to 1 March 2021 for patients with influenza and COVID-19, respectively. The primary outcome is any superinfection within 90 days of admission to the ICU. We will use logistic regression analysis comparing COVID-19 with influenza A/B after adjustment for relevant predefined confounders. Secondarily, we will use unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analyses to assess six potential risk factors (sex, age, cancer [including haematological], immunosuppression and use of life support on day 1 in the ICU) for superinfections and compare outcomes in patients with COVID-19 with/without superinfections, and present descriptive data regarding the superinfections. CONCLUSION: This study will provide important knowledge about superinfections in ICU patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Superinfection , Cohort Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2 , Superinfection/epidemiology
6.
N Engl J Med ; 384(24): 2283-2294, 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Targeted temperature management is recommended for patients after cardiac arrest, but the supporting evidence is of low certainty. METHODS: In an open-label trial with blinded assessment of outcomes, we randomly assigned 1900 adults with coma who had had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac or unknown cause to undergo targeted hypothermia at 33°C, followed by controlled rewarming, or targeted normothermia with early treatment of fever (body temperature, ≥37.8°C). The primary outcome was death from any cause at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included functional outcome at 6 months as assessed with the modified Rankin scale. Prespecified subgroups were defined according to sex, age, initial cardiac rhythm, time to return of spontaneous circulation, and presence or absence of shock on admission. Prespecified adverse events were pneumonia, sepsis, bleeding, arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise, and skin complications related to the temperature management device. RESULTS: A total of 1850 patients were evaluated for the primary outcome. At 6 months, 465 of 925 patients (50%) in the hypothermia group had died, as compared with 446 of 925 (48%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.14; P = 0.37). Of the 1747 patients in whom the functional outcome was assessed, 488 of 881 (55%) in the hypothermia group had moderately severe disability or worse (modified Rankin scale score ≥4), as compared with 479 of 866 (55%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.09). Outcomes were consistent in the prespecified subgroups. Arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise was more common in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group (24% vs. 17%, P<0.001). The incidence of other adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with coma after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, targeted hypothermia did not lead to a lower incidence of death by 6 months than targeted normothermia. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council and others; TTM2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02908308.).


Subject(s)
Fever/therapy , Hypothermia, Induced , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy , Aged , Body Temperature , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Coma/etiology , Coma/therapy , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Hypothermia, Induced/adverse effects , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/complications , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/mortality , Single-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome
7.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 65(10): 1421-1430, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273068

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the early phase of the pandemic, some guidelines recommended the use of corticosteroids for critically ill patients with COVID-19, whereas others recommended against the use despite lack of firm evidence of either benefit or harm. In the COVID STEROID trial, we aimed to assess the effects of low-dose hydrocortisone on patient-centred outcomes in adults with COVID-19 and severe hypoxia. METHODS: In this multicentre, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, blinded, centrally randomised, stratified clinical trial, we randomly assigned adults with confirmed COVID-19 and severe hypoxia (use of mechanical ventilation or supplementary oxygen with a flow of at least 10 L/min) to either hydrocortisone (200 mg/d) vs a matching placebo for 7 days or until hospital discharge. The primary outcome was the number of days alive without life support at day 28 after randomisation. RESULTS: The trial was terminated early when 30 out of 1000 participants had been enrolled because of external evidence indicating benefit from corticosteroids in severe COVID-19. At day 28, the median number of days alive without life support in the hydrocortisone vs placebo group were 7 vs 10 (adjusted mean difference: -1.1 days, 95% CI -9.5 to 7.3, P = .79); mortality was 6/16 vs 2/14; and the number of serious adverse reactions 1/16 vs 0/14. CONCLUSIONS: In this trial of adults with COVID-19 and severe hypoxia, we were unable to provide precise estimates of the benefits and harms of hydrocortisone as compared with placebo as only 3% of the planned sample size were enrolled. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04348305. European Union Drug Regulation Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT) Database: 2020-001395-15.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydrocortisone , Adult , Humans , Hypoxia , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
8.
Int J Epidemiol ; 49(5): 1468-1481, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Population-level knowledge on individuals at high risk of severe and fatal coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is urgently needed to inform targeted protection strategies in the general population. METHODS: We examined characteristics and predictors of hospitalization and death in a nationwide cohort of all Danish individuals tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) from 27 February 2020 until 19 May 2020. RESULTS: We identified 11 122 SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction-positive cases of whom 80% were community-managed and 20% were hospitalized. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 5.2%. Age was strongly associated with fatal disease {odds ratio [OR] 15 [95% confidence interval (CI): 9-26] for 70-79 years, increasing to OR 90 (95% CI: 50-162) for ≥90 years, when compared with cases aged 50-59 years and adjusted for sex and number of co-morbidities}. Similarly, the number of co-morbidities was associated with fatal disease [OR 5.2 (95% CI: 3.4-8.0), for cases with at least four co-morbidities vs no co-morbidities] and 79% of fatal cases had at least two co-morbidities. Most major chronic diseases were associated with hospitalization, with ORs ranging from 1.3-1.4 (e.g. stroke, ischaemic heart disease) to 2.6-3.4 (e.g. heart failure, hospital-diagnosed kidney disease, organ transplantation) and with mortality with ORs ranging from 1.1-1.3 (e.g. ischaemic heart disease, hypertension) to 2.5-3.2 (e.g. major psychiatric disorder, organ transplantation). In the absence of co-morbidities, mortality was <5% in persons aged ≤80 years. CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide population-based COVID-19 study, increasing age and multimorbidity were strongly associated with hospitalization and death. In the absence of co-morbidities, the mortality was, however, <5% until the age of 80 years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cause of Death , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Med Mycol Case Rep ; 31: 29-31, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957312

ABSTRACT

Severely ill influenza patients are at increased risk of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Previous reports suggest that Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients may also be at increased risk of IPA. Here we present an Aspergillus co-infection in a COVID-19 immunocompetent patient, complicated by bacteremia and persistent hyperthermia. We describe the challenges in diagnosing IPA in COVID-19 immunocompetent patients and how the patient responded to the treatment.

10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(7): e2013880, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621959

ABSTRACT

Importance: During the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, case reports have suggested that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may lead to adverse outcomes. Objective: To study the association of NSAID use with adverse outcomes in patients hospitalized with influenza or influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used propensity score matching among 7747 individuals aged 40 years or older who were hospitalized with influenza, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction or antigen testing, between 2010 and 2018. Data were collected using Danish nationwide registers. All analyses reported were performed on May 29, 2020. Exposures: Prescription fill of an NSAID within 60 days before admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: Risk ratio (RR) and risk difference (RD) with 95% CIs for intensive care unit admission and death within 30 days of admission. Results: A total of 7747 patients (median [interquartile range] age, 71 [59-80] years, 3980 [51.4%] men) with confirmed influenza were identified. Of these, 520 (6.7%) were exposed to NSAIDs. In the unmatched cohorts, 104 of 520 patients (20.0%) who used NSAIDs and 958 of 7227 patients (13.3%) who did not use NSAIDs were admitted to the intensive care unit. For death within 30 days of admission, we observed 37 events (7.1%) among those who used NSAIDs compared with 563 events (7.8%) among those who did not. Current NSAID use was associated with intensive care unit admission (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.81; RD, 6.7%; 95% CI, 3.2% to 10.3%), while NSAID use was not associated with death (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.26; RD, -0.7%; 95% CI, -3.0% to 1.6%). In the matched cohorts, risks were unchanged for patients who used NSAIDs, while 83 ICU admissions (16.0%) and 36 deaths (6.9%) were observed among matched individuals who did not use NSAIDs. Matched (ie, adjusted) analyses yielded attenuated risk estimates for intensive care unit admission (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.63; RD, 4.0%; 95% CI, -0.6% to 8.7%) and death (RR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.60; RD, 0.2%; 95% CI, -2.9% to 3.3%). Associations were more pronounced among patients who used NSAIDs for a longer period (eg, for intensive care unit admission: RR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.19 to 3.06; RD, 13.4%; 95% CI, 4.0% to 22.8%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with influenza, the use of NSAIDs was not associated with 30-day intensive care unit admission or death in adjusted analyses. There was an association between long-term use of NSAIDs and intensive care unit admission.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 65(1): 68-75, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760094

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most data on intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19 originate in selected populations from stressed healthcare systems with shorter term follow-up. We present characteristics, interventions and longer term outcomes of the entire, unselected cohort of all ICU patients with COVID-19 in Denmark where the ICU capacity was not exceeded. METHODS: We identified all patients with SARS-CoV-2 admitted to any Danish ICU from 10 March to 19 May 2020 and registered demographics, chronic comorbidities, use of organ support, length of stay, and vital status from patient files. Risk factors for death were analyzed using adjusted Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: There were 323 ICU patients with confirmed COVID-19. Median age was 68 years, 74% were men, 50% had hypertension, 21% diabetes, and 20% chronic pulmonary disease; 29% had no chronic comorbidity. Invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 82%, vasopressors in 83%, renal replacement therapy in 26%, and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation in 8%. ICU stay was median 13 days (IQR 6-22) and hospital stay 19 days (11-30). Median follow-up was 79 days. At end of follow-up, 118 had died (37%), 15 (4%) were still in hospital hereof 4 in ICU as of 16 June 2020. Risk factors for mortality included male gender, age, chronic pulmonary disease, active cancer, and number of co-morbidities. CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide, population-based cohort of ICU patients with COVID-19, longer term survival was high despite high age and substantial use of organ support. Male gender, age, and chronic co-morbidities, in particular chronic pulmonary disease, were associated with increased risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Concurrent Review , Demography , Denmark , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome , Vital Signs
12.
PLoS Med ; 17(9): e1003308, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns over the safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection have been raised. We studied whether use of NSAIDs was associated with adverse outcomes and mortality during SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based cohort study using Danish administrative and health registries. We included individuals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 during the period 27 February 2020 to 29 April 2020. NSAID users (defined as individuals having filled a prescription for NSAIDs up to 30 days before the SARS-CoV-2 test) were matched to up to 4 non-users on calendar week of the test date and propensity scores based on age, sex, relevant comorbidities, and use of selected prescription drugs. The main outcome was 30-day mortality, and NSAID users were compared to non-users using risk ratios (RRs) and risk differences (RDs). Secondary outcomes included hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and acute renal replacement therapy. A total of 9,236 SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive individuals were eligible for inclusion. The median age in the study cohort was 50 years, and 58% were female. Of these, 248 (2.7%) had filled a prescription for NSAIDs, and 535 (5.8%) died within 30 days. In the matched analyses, treatment with NSAIDs was not associated with 30-day mortality (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.82, p = 0.95; RD 0.1%, 95% CI -3.5% to 3.7%, p = 0.95), risk of hospitalization (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.53, p = 0.31; RD 3.3%, 95% CI -3.4% to 10%, p = 0.33), ICU admission (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.02, p = 0.90; RD 0.2%, 95% CI -3.0% to 3.4%, p = 0.90), mechanical ventilation (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.56 to 2.30, p = 0.72; RD 0.5%, 95% CI -2.5% to 3.6%, p = 0.73), or renal replacement therapy (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.24 to 3.09, p = 0.81; RD -0.2%, 95% CI -2.0% to 1.6%, p = 0.81). The main limitations of the study are possible exposure misclassification, as not all individuals who fill an NSAID prescription use the drug continuously, and possible residual confounding by indication, as NSAIDs may generally be prescribed to healthier individuals due to their side effects, but on the other hand may also be prescribed for early symptoms of severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Use of NSAIDs was not associated with 30-day mortality, hospitalization, ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, or renal replacement therapy in Danish individuals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The European Union electronic Register of Post-Authorisation Studies EUPAS34734.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Denmark , Drug Prescriptions , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Kidney , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Renal Dialysis , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Clin Epidemiol ; 12: 875-881, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729591

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To facilitate research on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a prospective cohort of all Danish residents tested for SARS-CoV-2 in Denmark is established. DATA STRUCTURE: All Danish residents tested by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) for SARS-CoV-2 in Denmark are included. The cohort is identified using the Danish Microbiology Database. Individual-level record linkage between administrative and health-care registries is facilitated by the Danish Civil Registration System. Information on outcomes related to SARS-CoV-2 infection includes hospital admission, intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, and death and is retrieved from the five administrative Danish regions, the Danish National Patient Registry, and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. The Patient Registry further provides a complete hospital contact history of somatic and psychiatric conditions and procedures. Data on all prescriptions filled at community pharmacies are available from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Health-care authorization status is obtained from the Danish Register of Healthcare Professionals. Finally, selected laboratory values are obtained from the Register of Laboratory Results for Research. The cohort is governed by a steering committee with representatives from the Danish Medicines Agency, Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Health Authority, the Danish Health Data Authority, Danish Patients, the Faculties of Health Sciences at the Danish universities, and Danish regions. The steering committee welcomes suggestions for research studies and collaborations. Research proposals will be prioritized based on timeliness and potential clinical and public health implications. All research protocols assessing specific hypotheses for medicines will be made publicly available using the European Union electronic Register of Post-Authorisation Studies. CONCLUSION: The Danish COVID-19 cohort includes all Danish residents with an RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2. Through individual-level linkage with existing Danish health and administrative registries, this is a valuable data source for epidemiological research on SARS-CoV-2.

14.
J Clin Pathol ; 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691083

ABSTRACT

There is growing evidence of histopathological changes in autopsied individuals infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2); however, data on histopathological changes in autopsied patients with eradicated COVID-19 are limited. We performed an autopsy on a Caucasian female in her 80s, who died due to severe, bilateral pulmonary fibrosis after eliminated SARS-CoV-2 infection. In addition, CT scans from 2 months before infection and from 6 days prior to death were compared. Comparison of the CT scans showed bilateral development of widespread fibrosis in previously healthy lungs. Microscopic examination showed different areas with acute and organising diffuse alveolar damage and fibrosis with honeycomb-like remodelling and bronchial metaplasia. We here report a unique autopsy case with development of widespread pulmonary fibrosis in a woman in her 80s with previous COVID-19 and no history of pulmonary illnesses.

15.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 64(9): 1365-1375, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671325

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 has caused a pandemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) with many patients developing hypoxic respiratory failure. Corticosteroids reduce the time on mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and potentially also mortality in similar patient populations. However, corticosteroids have undesirable effects, including longer time to viral clearance. Clinical equipoise on the use of corticosteroids for COVID-19 exists. METHODS: The COVID STEROID trial is an international, randomised, stratified, blinded clinical trial. We will allocate 1000 adult patients with COVID-19 receiving ≥10 L/min of oxygen or on mechanical ventilation to intravenous hydrocortisone 200 mg daily vs placebo (0.9% saline) for 7 days. The primary outcome is days alive without life support (ie mechanical ventilation, circulatory support, and renal replacement therapy) at day 28. Secondary outcomes are serious adverse reactions at day 14; days alive without life support at day 90; days alive and out of hospital at day 90; all-cause mortality at day 28, day 90, and 1 year; and health-related quality of life at 1 year. We will conduct the statistical analyses according to this protocol, including interim analyses for every 250 patients followed for 28 days. The primary outcome will be compared using the Kryger Jensen and Lange test in the intention to treat population and reported as differences in means and medians with 95% confidence intervals. DISCUSSION: The COVID STEROID trial will provide important evidence to guide the use of corticosteroids in COVID-19 and severe hypoxia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydrocortisone/therapeutic use , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Research Design , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Treatment Outcome
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