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1.
Danish Medical Journal ; 69(5), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2309107

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Knowledge of the seroprevalence and duration of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 was needed in the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and is still necessary for policy makers and healthcare professionals. This information allows us to better understand the risk of reinfection in previously infected individuals. Methods. We investigated the prevalence and duration of detectable antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in sequentially collected samples from 379 healthcare professionals. Results. SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence at inclusion was 5.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-8.0%) and 25% of seropositive participants reverted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the calculated probability of having detectable antibodies among former seropositive participants was 72.2% (95% CI: 54.2-96.2%). Conclusion. Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detectable in a subset of infected individuals for a minimum of 39 weeks.

2.
Administration and Society ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2293469

ABSTRACT

This study examines vaccine allocation policy during the COVID-19 pandemic by applying a hierarchical, a negotiation, and a cultural perspective. It addresses how vaccine allocation principles under conditions of scarcity are translated into practice in the case of Norway. A main finding is that the policy was informed by instrumentalism as well as by path dependencies, but over time the issue became more salient by activating stakeholder interests, which resulted in an adaptation of established norms. The three perspectives reveal how different approaches to a "fair vaccine allocation” policy can lead to different explanations of the same phenomenon. © The Author(s) 2023.

3.
Public Organization Review ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2269936

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the crisis management learning by the Norwegian government after the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on types of learning based on the concepts of governance capacity and legitimacy. Using unique interview data with 36 elite administrative and political executives in Norway, the study finds varied learning by the involved actors, and most learning about coordination between ministries and agencies, which are amplified by the lack of knowledge related to analytical capacity. The study contributes to advance the analytical understanding of crisis management learning and provides insight into what a high performing government in the pandemic attempts to learn. © 2023, The Author(s).

4.
International Public Management Journal ; 26(1):126-144, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2242912

ABSTRACT

Input, throughput, and output legitimacy of government measures are considered to be essential for governance capacity in crisis. During the COVID-19 crisis, governments around the world developed digital contact-tracing applications to support their crisis management—with varying degrees of success. While Norway is seen as a high performer in the crisis, the contact-tracing app called Smittestopp developed in Norway had little impact. Using a case study, we studied the governance capacity and legitimacy of this technology in terms of how it was developed, how much it was utilized by citizens, and its usefulness relative to other government measures. Although the app did very little to help the COVID-19 crisis management in Norway, we identify some important lessons to be learned. We argue that the initial input and throughput legitimacy is important if a government policy is to maintain output legitimacy over time and be effective in a crisis. Consequently, this study contributes to the literature on governance capacity and legitimacy in crisis management. © 2022 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

5.
Applied Mobilities ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2134621

ABSTRACT

When mobility normality breaks down, new futures can emerge. This paper explores COVID-19 disruptions of everyday mobility in Danish cities and new emerging pathways toward less carbon-intensive mobility futures in the light of the mobile risk society and practice theory. It uses a stakeholder workshop with public transport providers as empirical outset to start conceptualizing new discussions that have emerged in the wake of COVID-19. Through four inquiries into pandemic-induced changes–including reducing, remoding, rescheduling and replacing mobility practices–it discusses how a new critical view on “business as usual” has emerged from the pandemic, especially in relation to public transport and linkage to other transport modes. © 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

6.
Danish Medical Journal ; 69(5), 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1989656

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Knowledge of the seroprevalence and duration of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 was needed in the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and is still necessary for policy makers and healthcare professionals. This information allows us to better understand the risk of reinfection in previously infected individuals. Methods. We investigated the prevalence and duration of detectable antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in sequentially collected samples from 379 healthcare professionals. Results. SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence at inclusion was 5.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-8.0%) and 25% of seropositive participants reverted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the calculated probability of having detectable antibodies among former seropositive participants was 72.2% (95% CI: 54.2-96.2%). Conclusion. Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detectable in a subset of infected individuals for a minimum of 39 weeks.

7.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine ; 56(SUPP 1):S247-S247, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1848795
8.
Public Organization Review ; : 17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1813781

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on the role of experts in the Norwegian decision-making process in central government during the crisis management of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is based on a structural-instrumental and a cultural perspective. The main findings are that managing the pandemic led to a centralization of power in the hands of the political leadership, a blurring of the dichotomy between politics and administration, and a variety of expert advice. The crisis management also reflected the cultural appropriateness of a collaborative decision-making style, but it was not characterized by a scientization of policymaking. Rather than policymaking by experts it was policymaking informed by experts.

9.
Research in the Sociology of Organizations ; 76:179-200, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1480049

ABSTRACT

This paper is a theoretical review of the logic of appropriateness. First, it defines what is meant by a logic of appropriateness in the work of March and Olsen and then discusses the dynamics of the logics of appropriateness and consequence. Second, it examines how the rules of appropriateness have developed and changed and discusses the advantages of using the logic of appropriateness. Third, it illustrates some applications of the logic of appropriateness by focusing on studies of public sector reforms and suggests how the logic of appropriateness might be used to understand the handling of COVID-19. Fourth, some of the critiques and elaborations of the logic of appropriateness are discussed. Finally, some conclusions are drawn and needs for future research indicated. © 2021 by Emerald Publishing Limited.

10.
Public Organization Review ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1391946

ABSTRACT

Norway’s handling of COVID-19 has been seen as a success. Vulnerable groups among young and elderly people, have however, not been part of this success. Their interests have been defocused in two ways. First, they have not been prioritized in the big picture, because the precautionary principle and health concerns, in particular the capacity questions, have dominated. Second, the more specific social policy measures have been indirect and not particular targeted vulnerable children, youths and old people, and had negative effects for them, such as social isolation and lack of daily support and services, resulting in increasing problems. © 2021, The Author(s).

11.
Danish Medical Journal ; 67(9), 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-984502

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing pandemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Limited data are available describing the clinical presentation and outcomes of hospitalised COVID-19 patients in Europe. METHODS:This was a single-centre retrospective chart review of all patients with COVID-19 admitted to the North Zealand Hospital in Denmark between 1 March and 4 May 2020. Main outcomes include major therapeutic interventions during hospitalisation, such as invasive mechanical ventilation, as well as death. RESULTS: A total of 115 patients were included, including four infants. The median age of adults was 68 years and 40% were female. At admission, 55 (50%) patients had a fever, 29 (26%) had a respiratory rate exceeding 24 breaths/minute, and 78 (70%) received supplemental oxygen. The prevalence of co-infection was 13%. Twenty patients (18%) (median age: 64 years;15% female) were treated in the intensive care unit. Twelve (10.4%) received invasive mechanical ventilation and three (2.6%) renal replacement therapy. Nine patients (8%) developed pulmonary embolism. Sixteen patients (14%) died. Among patients requiring mechanical ventilation (n=12), seven (6.1%) were discharged alive, four (3.4%) died and one (0.9%) was still hospitalised. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of hospitalised COVID-19 patients, mortality was lower than in other Danish and European case series.

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