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1.
Expert Rev Respir Med ; 16(9): 983-995, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042469

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As millions of people worldwide recover from COVID-19, a substantial proportion continue to have persistent symptoms, pulmonary function abnormalities, and radiological findings suggestive of post-COVID interstitial lung disease (ILD). To date, there is limited scientific evidence on the management of post-COVID ILD, necessitating a consensus-based approach. AREAS COVERED: A panel of experts in pulmonology and thoracic radiology was constituted. Key questions regarding the management of post-COVID ILD were identified. A search was performed on PubMed and EMBASE and updated till 1 March 2022. The relevant literature regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of post-COVID ILD was summarized. Subsequently, suggestions regarding the management of these patients were framed, and a consensus was obtained using the Delphi approach. Those suggestions which were approved by over 80% of the panelists were accepted. The final document was approved by all panel members. EXPERT OPINION: Dedicated facilities should be established for the care of patients with post-COVID ILD. Symptom screening, pulmonary function testing, and thoracic imaging have a role in the diagnosis. The pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic options for the management of post-COVID ILD are discussed. Further research into the pathophysiology and management of post-COVID ILD will improve our understanding of this condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Humans , Delphi Technique , COVID-19/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Consensus , Lung/diagnostic imaging
3.
Lung India ; 38(3): 211-215, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215553

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can increase compliance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD). There is paucity of data on this in India. AIMS: To study the effectiveness of home-based PR on lung function, health-related quality of life, exercise tolerance and dyspnea among patients with COPD. SETTING: The Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Christian Medical College, Vellore. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study which included COPD patients who found hospital-based PR impractical. Those willing for home-based PR constituted the intervention group and those unwilling, constituted the control group. Both groups received standard of care otherwise. At 6 weeks, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), six-minute walk test distance (6MWD), COPD assessment test (CAT) score and modified Borg dyspnea scale were compared with their baseline values. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student paired t-test. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients completed the study, 21 in each arm. The baseline characteristics were comparable. The improvement in FEV1 was 90 ml in the intervention group and 4 ml in the control group (P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in 6MWD change. SGRQ score, Borg scale and CAT score improved significantly by 10.4, 2.4, and 3.4, respectively, in the intervention group when compared to the control group (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Home-based PR effectively provides tangible benefits in FEV1, QOL, exercise tolerance and dyspnea. It should be offered to those who are unable to avail institution-based PR, especially in this era of COVID pandemic.

4.
Indian J Tuberc ; 67(4S): S122-S127, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by a novel corona virus, health care personnel are at increased risk of acquiring the infection. In preparation for the management of health care personnel that are likely to be infected, we looked in to the data collected during the Influenza pandemic in 2009, caused by a novel strain of H1N1 influenza called swine flu. The care of healthcare personnel in our institution, who had an acute febrile respiratory illness (AFRI) during that period was routed through a single channel using a uniform protocol. We retrospectively analysed the available data, during the initial four months of the pandemic, to draw lessons from it. OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence, clinical profile and risk factors of swine flu among health care personnel during the pandemic of 2009 in a tertiary care hospital in South India. METHODOLOGY: This retrospective study enrolled all the health care personnel including students of a tertiary care institution in South India, who presented with an AFRI between June to August, the initial four months of the swine flu pandemic of 2009. The clinical profile and risk factors were extracted. The results of the RT PCR for swine flu was obtained. Prevalence in each demographic group was calculated and compared. Characteristics of those with swine flu were compared with those who turned negative for the swine flu. RESULTS: The prevalence of all AFRI and only swine flu among health care personnel during the study period was 18 per thousand and 8.7 per thousand respectively. Highest prevalence of swine flu was found among students and office staff. After adjusting for confounding factors, hyperthermia at presentation was significantly higher {OR = 1.97; 95% CI (1.01-3.76)} among those who tested positive for swine flu as compared with those with other AFRI's. Only 2.5% of the entire AFRI group required admission and there was no mortality. CONCLUSION: Health care personnel are at increased risk of acquiring infection. Our study demonstrated that students and office staff were the most susceptible. Unprotected exposure to unknown infectious patients and relatives is likely to have been an important factor. Though the mode of transmission is similar, compared to H1N1, COVID-19 is associated with different comorbidities and has significantly higher mortality. Therefore, in preparation for the COVID-19 pandemic, the personal protective equipment of the healthcare personnel need to be escalated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Female , Humans , India , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Mass Screening , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
6.
Lung India ; 37(3): 238-245, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-206054

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has ravaged the nations and has created the institution of unprecedented measures globally toward its containment. Extraordinary measures may be needed for health-care preparedness, to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care workers who are at the frontlines in such pandemics are the most vulnerable. These issues are addressed in this article.

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