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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 783975, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699418

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited information on the functional neutralizing capabilities of breastmilk SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies and the potential adulteration of breastmilk with vaccine mRNA after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of lactating healthcare workers who received the BNT162b2 vaccine and their infants. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies, antibody isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM) and intact mRNA in serum and breastmilk was evaluated at multiple time points using a surrogate neutralizing assay, ELISA, and PCR, over a 6 week period of the two-dose vaccination given 21 days apart. Results: Thirty-five lactating mothers, median age 34 years (IQR 32-36), were included. All had detectable neutralizing antibodies in the serum immediately before dose 2, with significant increase in neutralizing antibody levels 7 days after this dose [median 168.4 IU/ml (IQR 100.7-288.5) compared to 2753.0 IU/ml (IQR 1627.0-4712.0), p <0.001]. Through the two vaccine doses, all mothers had detectable IgG1, IgA and IgM isotypes in their serum, with a notable increase in all three antibody isotypes after dose 2, especially IgG1 levels. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in majority of breastmilk samples a week after dose 2 [median 13.4 IU/ml (IQR 7.0-28.7)], with persistence of these antibodies up to 3 weeks after. Post the second vaccine dose, all (35/35, 100%) mothers had detectable breastmilk SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD-specific IgG1 and IgA antibody and 32/35 (88.6%) mothers with IgM. Transient, low intact vaccine mRNA levels was detected in 20/74 (27%) serum samples from 21 mothers, and 5/309 (2%) breastmilk samples from 4 mothers within 1 weeks of vaccine dose. Five infants, median age 8 months (IQR 7-16), were also recruited - none had detectable neutralizing antibodies or vaccine mRNA in their serum. Conclusion: Majority of lactating mothers had detectable SARS-CoV-2 antibody isotypes and neutralizing antibodies in serum and breastmilk, especially after dose 2 of BNT162b2 vaccination. Transient, low levels of vaccine mRNA were detected in the serum of vaccinated mothers with occasional transfer to their breastmilk, but we did not detect evidence of infant sensitization. Importantly, the presence of breastmilk neutralising antibodies likely provides a foundation for passive immunisation of the breastmilk-fed infant.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Milk, Human/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , /blood , Cohort Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/analysis , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/blood , Infant , Lactation , Milk, Human/chemistry , Prospective Studies
2.
Frontiers in immunology ; 12, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1652390

ABSTRACT

Background There is limited information on the functional neutralizing capabilities of breastmilk SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies and the potential adulteration of breastmilk with vaccine mRNA after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of lactating healthcare workers who received the BNT162b2 vaccine and their infants. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies, antibody isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM) and intact mRNA in serum and breastmilk was evaluated at multiple time points using a surrogate neutralizing assay, ELISA, and PCR, over a 6 week period of the two-dose vaccination given 21 days apart. Results Thirty-five lactating mothers, median age 34 years (IQR 32-36), were included. All had detectable neutralizing antibodies in the serum immediately before dose 2, with significant increase in neutralizing antibody levels 7 days after this dose [median 168.4 IU/ml (IQR 100.7-288.5) compared to 2753.0 IU/ml (IQR 1627.0-4712.0), p <0.001]. Through the two vaccine doses, all mothers had detectable IgG1, IgA and IgM isotypes in their serum, with a notable increase in all three antibody isotypes after dose 2, especially IgG1 levels. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in majority of breastmilk samples a week after dose 2 [median 13.4 IU/ml (IQR 7.0-28.7)], with persistence of these antibodies up to 3 weeks after. Post the second vaccine dose, all (35/35, 100%) mothers had detectable breastmilk SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD-specific IgG1 and IgA antibody and 32/35 (88.6%) mothers with IgM. Transient, low intact vaccine mRNA levels was detected in 20/74 (27%) serum samples from 21 mothers, and 5/309 (2%) breastmilk samples from 4 mothers within 1 weeks of vaccine dose. Five infants, median age 8 months (IQR 7-16), were also recruited - none had detectable neutralizing antibodies or vaccine mRNA in their serum. Conclusion Majority of lactating mothers had detectable SARS-CoV-2 antibody isotypes and neutralizing antibodies in serum and breastmilk, especially after dose 2 of BNT162b2 vaccination. Transient, low levels of vaccine mRNA were detected in the serum of vaccinated mothers with occasional transfer to their breastmilk, but we did not detect evidence of infant sensitization. Importantly, the presence of breastmilk neutralising antibodies likely provides a foundation for passive immunisation of the breastmilk-fed infant.

3.
Singapore Med J ; 2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192706

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we provide guidance to clinicians who care for infants born to mothers with suspected/confirmed COVID-19 during this current pandemic. We reviewed available literature and international guidelines based on the following themes: delivery room management; infection control and prevention strategies; neonatal severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 testing; breastfeeding and breastmilk feeding; rooming-in of mother-infant; respiratory support precautions; visiting procedures; de-isolation and discharge of infant; outpatient clinic attendance; transport of infant; and training of healthcare staff. This guidance for clinical care was proposed and contextualised for the local setting via consensus by members of this workgroup and was based on evidence available as of 31 July 2020, and may change as new evidence emerges.

4.
Int Breastfeed J ; 16(1): 29, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158216

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations on infant feeding in the context of COVID-19 uphold standing recommendations for breastfeeding, non-separation, and skin-to-skin contact, including the use of donor human milk when mother's own milk is not available. INSUFFICIENT GUIDANCE ON THE USE OF DONOR HUMAN MILK AND THE ROLE OF HUMAN MILK BANKS IN THE PANDEMIC RESPONSE: COVID-19 clinical management guidelines in seven countries in Southeast Asia are not aligned with WHO recommendations despite the lack of evidence of transmission through either breastmilk or breastfeeding. The use of safe donor human milk accessed through human milk banks is also insufficiently recommended, even in countries with an existing human milk bank, leading to a gap in evidence-based management of COVID-19. This highlights long-standing challenges as well as opportunities in the safe, equitable, and resilient implementation of human milk banks in the region. CONCLUSIONS: This statement reflects the expert opinion of the Regional Human Milk Bank Network for Southeast Asia and Beyond on the need to revisit national guidelines based on the best evidence for breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic, to incorporate human milk bank services in national obstetric and newborn care guidelines for COVID-19 where possible, and to ensure that operations of human milk banks are adapted to meet the needs of the current pandemic and to sustain donor human milk supply in the long-term. The Network also recommends sustained engagement with the global human milk bank community.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , COVID-19/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic , Milk Banks/organization & administration , Milk Banks/standards , Milk, Human , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , Humans , World Health Organization
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(12)2020 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991778

ABSTRACT

The aetiology of febrile exanthems in children is often difficult to distinguish clinically. A diagnosis of Kawasaki disease (KD) should be considered in infants with exanthematous fever. More perplexing is the increasing incidence of an atypical form of KD. Pathogenesis of KD remains unclear even though an aberrant response of the immune system to an unidentified pathogen is often hypothesised. A 30-fold increase in the incidence of KD in Italy during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic suggests an immune response to a viral trigger. We report an infant clinically diagnosed with high probability as incomplete KD, who presented with reactivation of the BCG injection site even though fever with rash was only less than 3 days duration. Echocardiography confirmed coronary artery abnormalities and prompt treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin facilitated rapid recovery. Physicians should consider a diagnosis of KD if BCG site reactivation is noted in children presenting with febrile exanthema.


Subject(s)
Exanthema/etiology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/complications , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage , Fever , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Infant , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy , Vaccination/adverse effects , gamma-Globulins/therapeutic use
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