Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 3 de 3
Filter
Add filters

Language
Document Type
Year range
1.
The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy ; 43(5/6):418-435, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2322476

ABSTRACT

PurposeThe article examines the interplay between welfare state regimes and the distribution of welfare between generations.Design/methodology/approachUsing data from 2017 for 24 European countries on six standard of living dimensions, the authors investigate the intergenerational welfare distribution in a two-stage procedure: (1) the authors compare the intergenerational welfare distribution across welfare state regimes using their existing typologies and find a moderate nexus. Therefore, (2) the authors employ clustering procedure to look for a new classification that would better reflect the cross-country variation in the intergenerational welfare division.FindingsThe authors find a complex relationship between the welfare state model and welfare distribution across generations and identify the policy patterns that shape it. Continental and liberal regimes are quite similar in these terms and favour the elderly generation. Social-democratic and CEE regimes seem to be a bit more balanced. COVID-19 pandemic will probably increase the intergenerational imbalance in terms of welfare distribution in favour of the elderly.Originality/valueIn contrast to the majority of previous studies, which employ inputs (social expenditures) or outputs (benefits, incomes), the authors use intergenerational balance indicators reflecting living conditions of a given generation as compared to the reference point defined as an average situation of all generations.

2.
Decision ; 49(3):311-327, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2149029

ABSTRACT

Ageing process may affect intergenerational relations in different ways, including income distribution. Simultaneously, the global economy has undergone various crises. An important question is whether these crises impact the nexus between ageing and intergenerational income distribution. Finding an answer to this question is difficult in the literature;although the crisis-income inequality nexus is quite often investigated, this is not in the intergenerational context. This paper attempts to solve such puzzles using data covering 13 OECD countries in the period 1995-2018. The findings show that the relationship between the age structure of the population and intergenerational income distribution before and after the Great Recession of 2007-2009 was quite different. Actually, the Great Recession seems to have triggered this nexus in such a way that the elderly won the intergenerational income game in the aftermath of the crisis;however, the working-age and younger cohorts took a rematch later. The results obtained may support the political decision-making how to cope with economic crises, including the present COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the economy and society, so as to treat different generations fair.

3.
DECISION ; : 1-17, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2045215

ABSTRACT

Ageing process may affect intergenerational relations in different ways, including income distribution. Simultaneously, the global economy has undergone various crises. An important question is whether these crises impact the nexus between ageing and intergenerational income distribution. Finding an answer to this question is difficult in the literature;although the crisis-income inequality nexus is quite often investigated, this is not in the intergenerational context. This paper attempts to solve such puzzles using data covering 13 OECD countries in the period 1995–2018. The findings show that the relationship between the age structure of the population and intergenerational income distribution before and after the Great Recession of 2007–2009 was quite different. Actually, the Great Recession seems to have triggered this nexus in such a way that the elderly won the intergenerational income game in the aftermath of the crisis;however, the working-age and younger cohorts took a rematch later. The results obtained may support the political decision-making how to cope with economic crises, including the present COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the economy and society, so as to treat different generations fair. Supplementary Information The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s40622-022-00325-w.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL