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1.
ACS Nano ; 16(9): 14239-14253, 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991501

ABSTRACT

Limitations of the recognition elements in terms of synthesis, cost, availability, and stability have impaired the translation of biosensors into practical use. Inspired by nature to mimic the molecular recognition of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 S protein antibody (AbS) by the S protein binding site, we synthesized the peptide sequence of Asn-Asn-Ala-Thr-Asn-COOH (abbreviated as PEP2003) to create COVID-19 screening label-free (LF) biosensors based on a carbon electrode, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The PEP2003 is easily obtained by chemical synthesis, and it can be adsorbed on electrodes while maintaining its ability for AbS recognition, further leading to a sensitivity 3.4-fold higher than the full-length S protein, which is in agreement with the increase in the target-to-receptor size ratio. Peptide-loaded LF devices based on noncovalent immobilization were developed by affording fast and simple analyses, along with a modular functionalization. From studies by molecular docking, the peptide-AbS binding was found to be driven by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, the peptide is not amenable to denaturation, thus addressing the trade-off between scalability, cost, and robustness. The biosensor preserves 95.1% of the initial signal for 20 days when stored dry at 4 °C. With the aid of two simple equations fitted by machine learning (ML), the method was able to make the COVID-19 screening of 39 biological samples into healthy and infected groups with 100.0% accuracy. By taking advantage of peptide-related merits combined with advances in surface chemistry and ML-aided accuracy, this platform is promising to bring COVID-19 biosensors into mainstream use toward straightforward, fast, and accurate analyses at the point of care, with social and economic impacts being achieved.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , Metal Nanoparticles , Biosensing Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Carbon/chemistry , Electrochemical Techniques , Electrodes , Gold/chemistry , Humans , Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptides/chemistry
2.
Aquat Toxicol ; 245: 106104, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693934

ABSTRACT

There have been significant impacts of the current COVID-19 pandemic on society including high health and economic costs. However, little is known about the potential ecological risks of this virus despite its presence in freshwater systems. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the exposure of Poecilia reticulata juveniles to two peptides derived from Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, which was synthesized in the laboratory (named PSPD-2002 and PSPD-2003). For this, the animals were exposed for 35 days to the peptides at a concentration of 40 µg/L and different toxicity biomarkers were assessed. Our data indicated that the peptides were able to induce anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The biometric evaluation also revealed that the animals exposed to the peptides displayed alterations in the pattern of growth/development. Furthermore, the increased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymes were accompanied by increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which suggests a redox imbalance induced by SARS-CoV-2 spike protein peptides. Moreover, molecular docking analysis suggested a strong interaction of the peptides with the enzymes AChE, SOD and CAT, allowing us to infer that the observed effects are related to the direct action of the peptides on the functionality of these enzymes. Consequently, our study provided evidence that the presence of SARS-CoV-2 viral particles in the freshwater ecosystems offer a health risk to fish and other aquatic organisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Poecilia , Water Pollutants, Chemical , Acetylcholinesterase/metabolism , Animals , Catalase/metabolism , Ecosystem , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Poecilia/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Water Pollutants, Chemical/toxicity
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 745310, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477894

ABSTRACT

The emergence of several SARS-CoV-2 lineages presenting adaptive mutations is a matter of concern worldwide due to their potential ability to increase transmission and/or evade the immune response. While performing epidemiological and genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 in samples from Porto Ferreira-São Paulo-Brazil, we identified sequences classified by pangolin as B.1.1.28 harboring Spike L452R mutation, in the RBD region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences grouped into a monophyletic branch, with others from Brazil, mainly from the state of São Paulo. The sequences had a set of 15 clade defining amino acid mutations, of which six were in the Spike protein. A new lineage was proposed to Pango and it was accepted and designated P.4. In samples from the city of Porto Ferreira, P.4 lineage has been increasing in frequency since it was first detected in March 2021, corresponding to 34.7% of the samples sequenced in June, the second in prevalence after P.1. Also, it is circulating in 30 cities from the state of São Paulo, and it was also detected in one sample from the state of Sergipe and two from the state of Rio de Janeiro. Further studies are needed to understand whether P.4 should be considered a new threat.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Brazil , Humans , Mutation , Phylogeny , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
4.
J Virus Erad ; 7(3): 100054, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433618

ABSTRACT

New variants of SARS-CoV-2 Alpha (B.1.1.7); Beta (B.1.351) Gamma (P.1) and Delta (B.1.617.2) quickly spread in the UK, South Africa, Brazil and India, respectively. To address whether mutations in SARS-CoV-2 RBD spike protein could affect virus infectivity, peptides containing RBD amino acids mutations have been constructed and interacted with human ACE2 by computational methods. Our results suggest that mutations in RBD amino acids K417, E484, L452, T478 and N501 are expressively increasing the affinity of this protein with human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), consequently, variants Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B1.351), Gamma (P.1) and Delta (B.1.617.2) could be more infective in human cells compared with SARS-CoV-2 isolated in Wuhan-2019 and the Gamma and Delta variants could be the most infective among them.

5.
Molecules ; 26(16)2021 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355016

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak has rapidly spread on a global scale, affecting the economy and public health systems throughout the world. In recent years, peptide-based therapeutics have been widely studied and developed to treat infectious diseases, including viral infections. Herein, the antiviral effects of the lysine linked dimer des-Cys11, Lys12,Lys13-(pBthTX-I)2K ((pBthTX-I)2K)) and derivatives against SARS-CoV-2 are reported. The lead peptide (pBthTX-I)2K and derivatives showed attractive inhibitory activities against SARS-CoV-2 (EC50 = 28-65 µM) and mostly low cytotoxic effect (CC50 > 100 µM). To shed light on the mechanism of action underlying the peptides' antiviral activity, the Main Protease (Mpro) and Papain-Like protease (PLpro) inhibitory activities of the peptides were assessed. The synthetic peptides showed PLpro inhibition potencies (IC50s = 1.0-3.5 µM) and binding affinities (Kd = 0.9-7 µM) at the low micromolar range but poor inhibitory activity against Mpro (IC50 > 10 µM). The modeled binding mode of a representative peptide of the series indicated that the compound blocked the entry of the PLpro substrate toward the protease catalytic cleft. Our findings indicated that non-toxic dimeric peptides derived from the Bothropstoxin-I have attractive cellular and enzymatic inhibitory activities, thereby suggesting that they are promising prototypes for the discovery and development of new drugs against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Crotalid Venoms/chemistry , Dimerization , Papain/antagonists & inhibitors , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Papain/chemistry , Papain/metabolism , Peptides/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
Environ Pollut ; 289: 117818, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333397

ABSTRACT

Knowledge about how the COVID-19 pandemic can affect aquatic wildlife is still extremely limited, and no effect of SARS-CoV-2 or its structural constituents on invertebrate models has been reported so far. Thus, we investigated the presence of the 2019-new coronavirus in different urban wastewater samples and, later, evaluated the behavioral and biochemical effects of the exposure of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae to two SARS-CoV-2 spike protein peptides (PSPD-2002 and PSPD-2003) synthesized in our laboratory. Initially, our results show the contamination of wastewater by the new coronavirus, via RT-qPCR on the viral N1 gene. On the other hand, our study shows that short-term exposure (48 h) to a low concentration (40 µg/L) of the synthesized peptides induced changes in the locomotor and the olfactory-driven behavior of the C. quinquefascitus larvae, which were associated with increased production of ROS and AChE activity (cholinesterase effect). To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the larval phase of a freshwater invertebrate species. The results raise concerns at the ecological level where the observed biological effects may lead to drastic consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Culicidae , Animals , Biota , Humans , Larva , Pandemics , Peptides , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
7.
J Hazard Mater ; 419: 126463, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284211

ABSTRACT

The Spike protein (S protein) is a critical component in the infection of the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The objective of this work was to evaluate whether peptides from S protein could cause negative impact in the aquatic animals. The aquatic toxicity of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein peptides derivatives has been evaluated in tadpoles (n = 50 tadpoles/5 replicates of 10 animals) from species Physalaemus cuvieri (Leptodactylidae). After synthesis, purification, and characterization of peptides (PSDP2001, PSDP2002, PSDP2003) an aquatic contamination has been simulated with these peptides during 24 h of exposure in two concentrations (100 and 500 ng/mL). The control group ("C") was composed of tadpoles kept in polyethylene containers containing de-chlorinated water. Oxidative stress, antioxidant biomarkers and AChE activity were assessed. In both concentrations, PSPD2002 and PSPD2003 increased catalase and superoxide dismutase antioxidants enzymes activities, as well as oxidative stress (nitrite levels, hydrogen peroxide and reactive oxygen species). All three peptides also increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the highest concentration. These peptides showed molecular interactions in silico with acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant enzymes. Aquatic particle contamination of SARS-CoV-2 has cholinesterasic effect in P. cuvieri tadpoles. These findings indicate that the COVID-19 can constitute environmental impact or biological damage potential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Anura , Humans , Larva , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
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