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Frontiers in surgery ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1888119

ABSTRACT

Objective Patients with several thoracic complications induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection may benefit from surgery, but its role in this condition is largely unknown, and many surgeons’ advice against any surgical referrals. Our aim is to investigate the efficacy and safety of surgery in COVID-19 patients with thoracic complications requiring surgery. Methods We designed a multicenter observational study, involving nine thoracic surgery departments, evaluating patients who developed thoracic complications in hospital, surgically managed from March 1, 2020, to May 31, 2021. An overall 30-day mortality was obtained by using the Kaplan–Meier method. Multivariable Cox regression model and logistic models were applied to identify the variables associated with mortality and postoperative complications. Results Among 83 patients, 33 (40%) underwent surgery for complicated pneumothorax, 17 (20.5%) for pleural empyema, 13 (15.5%) for hemothorax, 8 (9.5%) for hemoptysis, 5 patients (6%) for lung abscess, 4 (5%) for infected pneumatoceles, and 3 (3.5%) for other causes. Within 30 days of surgery, 60 patients (72%) survived. At multivariable analysis, age (HR 1.05 [95% CI, 1.01, 1.09], p = 0.022), pulmonary hypertension (HR 3.98 [95% CI, 1.09, 14.5], p = 0.036), renal failure (HR 2.91 [95% CI, 1.19, 7.10], p-value 0.019), thoracotomy (HR 4.90 [95% CI, 1.84, 13.1], p-value 0.001) and infective affections (HR 0.17 [95% CI, 0.05, 0.58], p-value 0.004) were found to be independent prognostic risk factors for 30-day mortality. Age (OR 1.05 [95% CI, 1.01, 1.10], p = 0.023) and thoracotomy (OR 3.85 [95% CI, 1.35, 12.0] p = 0.014) became significant predictors for 30-day morbidity. Conclusion Surgical management of COVID-19-related thoracic complications is affected by high mortality and morbidity rates, but a 72% survival rate still seems to be satisfactory with a rescue intent. Younger patients without pulmonary hypertension, without renal insufficiency and undergoing surgery for infectious complications appear to have a better prognosis.

3.
Front Surg ; 8: 695341, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305709

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed many aspects of our private and professional routine. In particular, the lockdowns have severely affected the entire healthcare system and hospital activities, forcing it to rethink the protocols in force. We suggest that this scenario, in spite of the new challenges involving so far complex healthcare providers, may lead to the unique opportunity to rethink pathways and management of patients. Indeed, having to resume institutional activity after a long interruption that has completely canceled the previously existing schemes, healthcare providers have the unique opportunity to overcome obsolete and "we have always done in this way" model on the wave of the general desire to resume a normal life. Furthermore, the pandemic has highlighted some flaws in our health system, highlighting those critical issues that most need to be addressed. This article is a review of pre-pandemic literature addressing the use of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) and standardization processes in thoracic surgery to improve efficiency. Our goal is to identify the main issues that could be successfully improved along the entire pathway of a patient from the first referral to diagnosis, hospitalization, and surgical operation up to convalescence. Furthermore, we aim to identify the standardization processes that have been implemented to achieve significant improvements in patient outcomes while reducing costs. The methods and goals that could be used in the near future to modernize our healthcare systems are drawn up from a careful reading and interpretation in light of the pandemic of the most significant review articles in the literature.

4.
Front Surg ; 8: 679757, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259416

ABSTRACT

Background: Venous and arterial thromboembolism is commonly reported in critically ill COVID-19 patients, although there are still no definitive statistical data regarding its incidence. Case presentation: we report a case of a patient who fell ill with Covid during hospitalization for a pneumonectomy complicated by empyema and bronchopleural fistula. The patient, despite being cured of COVID, died after 14 days for pulmonary thromboembolism. Conclusion: Our case strengthens the suggestion of adequate thromboprophylaxis in all hospitalized COVID patients and of increasing prophylaxis in critically ill patients even in the absence of randomized studies.

5.
Front Surg ; 8: 648759, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140675

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 is a new disease with some manifestations not yet well-known. Sharing experiences in this topic is crucial for the optimal management of the patients. Case Presentation: Left upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) due to a mediastinal mass strongly suspected of lymphoproliferative disease in a patient affected by SARS-CoV-2, disappearing at the resolution of the viral infection. Conclusion: Before proceeding to surgical biopsy, mediastinal mass in SARS-CoV-2 patients must be revaluated after the resolution of the infection.

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