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1.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr ; 2022 Jul 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1936333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transthoracic echocardiography is the leading cardiac imaging modality for patients admitted with COVID-19, a condition of high short-term mortality. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that artificial intelligence (AI)-based analysis of echocardiographic images could predict mortality more accurately than conventional analysis by a human expert. METHODS: Patients admitted to 13 hospitals for acute COVID-19 who underwent transthoracic echocardiography were included. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular longitudinal strain (LVLS) were obtained manually by multiple expert readers and by automated AI software. The ability of the manual and AI analyses to predict all-cause mortality was compared. RESULTS: In total, 870 patients were enrolled. The mortality rate was 27.4% after a mean follow-up period of 230 ± 115 days. AI analysis had lower variability than manual analysis for both LVEF (P = .003) and LVLS (P = .005). AI-derived LVEF and LVLS were predictors of mortality in univariable and multivariable regression analysis (odds ratio, 0.974 [95% CI, 0.956-0.991; P = .003] for LVEF; odds ratio, 1.060 [95% CI, 1.019-1.105; P = .004] for LVLS), but LVEF and LVLS obtained by manual analysis were not. Direct comparison of the predictive value of AI versus manual measurements of LVEF and LVLS showed that AI was significantly better (P = .005 and P = .003, respectively). In addition, AI-derived LVEF and LVLS had more significant and stronger correlations to other objective biomarkers of acute disease than manual reads. CONCLUSIONS: AI-based analysis of LVEF and LVLS had similar feasibility as manual analysis, minimized variability, and consequently increased the statistical power to predict mortality. AI-based, but not manual, analyses were a significant predictor of in-hospital and follow-up mortality.

2.
J Pers Med ; 12(2)2022 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649806

ABSTRACT

The characteristics and clinical course of hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been widely described, while long-term data are still poor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcome and its association with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. This was a prospective multicenter study of consecutive COVID-19 patients hospitalized at seven Italian Hospitals from 28 February to 20 April 2020. The study population was divided into two groups according to echocardiographic evidence of RV dysfunction. The primary study outcome was 1-year mortality. The propensity score matching was performed to balance for potential baseline confounders. The study population consisted of 224 patients (mean age 69 ± 14, male sex 62%); RV dysfunction was diagnosed in 63 cases (28%). Patients with RV dysfunction were older (75 vs. 67 years, p < 0.001), had higher prevenance of coronary artery disease (27% vs. 11%, p = 0.003), and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (50% vs. 55%, p < 0.001). The rate of 1-year mortality (67% vs. 28%; p ≤ 0.001) was significantly higher in patients with RV dysfunction compared with patients without. After propensity score matching, patients with RV dysfunction showed a worse long-term survival (62% vs. 29%, p < 0.001). The multivariable Cox regression model showed an independent association of RV dysfunction with 1-year mortality. RV dysfunction is a relatively common finding in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and it is independently associated with an increased risk of 1-year mortality.

3.
European heart journal supplements : journal of the European Society of Cardiology ; 23(Suppl G), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602512

ABSTRACT

Aims Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a recently recognized viral infective disease which can be complicated by acute respiratory stress syndrome (ARDS) and cardiovascular complications including severe arrhythmias, acute coronary syndromes, myocarditis, and pulmonary embolism. The aim of the present study was to identify the clinical conditions and echocardiographic parameters associated with in-hospital mortality in COVID-19. Methods and results This is a multicentre retrospective observational study including seven Italian centres. Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 from 1 March to 22 April 2020, were included into the study population. The association between baseline variables and the risk of in-hospital mortality was assessed through multivariable logistic regression and competing risk analyses. Out of 1401 patients admitted at the participating centres with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, 226 (16.1%) underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and were included in the present analysis. The mean age was 68.9 ± 13.9 years and male sex was reported in 141 patients (62.4%). Admission in intensive care unit was required for 72 patients (31.9%);in-hospital death occurred in 68 patients (30.1%). At multivariable analysis, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, P < 0.001), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE, P < 0.001), and ARDS (P < 0.001) were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. At competing risk analysis, we found a significantly higher risk of mortality in patients with ARDS vs. those without ARDS (HR: 7.66;CI: 3.95–14.8), in patients with TAPSE ≤ 17 mm vs. those with TAPSE > 17 mm (HR: 5.08;CI: 3.15–8.19), and in patients with LVEF ≤ 50% vs. those with LVEF > 50% (HR: 4.06;CI: 2.50–6.59) (Figure). Conclusions TTE might be a useful tool in risk stratification of patients with COVID-19. In particular, reduced LVEF as well as reduced TAPSE may help to identify patients at higher risk of death during hospitalization. Our preliminary findings need to be confirmed in larger, prospective studies.618 Figure 1

4.
J Clin Med ; 10(24)2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572529

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. We aimed to identify possible predictors of in-hospital major cardiovascular (CV) events in COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively included patients hospitalized for COVID-19 from 10 centers. Clinical, biochemical, electrocardiographic, and imaging data at admission and medications were collected. Primary endpoint was a composite of in-hospital CV death, acute heart failure (AHF), acute myocarditis, arrhythmias, acute coronary syndromes (ACS), cardiocirculatory arrest, and pulmonary embolism (PE). RESULTS: Of the 748 patients included, 141(19%) reached the set endpoint: 49 (7%) CV death, 15 (2%) acute myocarditis, 32 (4%) sustained-supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias, 14 (2%) cardiocirculatory arrest, 8 (1%) ACS, 41 (5%) AHF, and 39 (5%) PE. Patients with CV events had higher age, body temperature, creatinine, high-sensitivity troponin, white blood cells, and platelet counts at admission and were more likely to have systemic hypertension, renal failure (creatinine ≥ 1.25 mg/dL), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atrial fibrillation, and cardiomyopathy. On univariate and multivariate analysis, troponin and renal failure were associated with the composite endpoint. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a clear divergence of in-hospital composite event-free survival stratified according to median troponin value and the presence of renal failure (Log rank p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, derived from a multicenter data collection study, suggest the routine use of biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin and serum creatinine, for in-hospital prediction of CV events in patients with COVID-19.

5.
J Pers Med ; 11(12)2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542636

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Pulmonary involvement in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may affect right ventricular (RV) function and pulmonary pressures. The prognostic value of tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAPS), and TAPSE/PAPS ratios have been poorly investigated in this clinical setting. METHODS AND RESULTS: This is a multicenter Italian study, including consecutive patients hospitalized for COVID-19. In-hospital mortality and pulmonary embolism (PE) were identified as the primary and secondary outcome measures, respectively. The study included 227 (16.1%) subjects (mean age 68 ± 13 years); intensive care unit (ICU) admission was reported in 32.2%. At competing risk analysis, after stratifying the population into tertiles, according to TAPSE, PAPS, and TAPSE/PAPS ratio values, patients in the lower TAPSE and TAPSE/PAPS tertiles, as well as those in the higher PAPS tertiles, showed a significantly higher incidence of death vs. the probability to be discharged during the hospitalization. At univariable logistic regression analysis, TAPSE, PAPS, and TAPSE/PAPS were significantly associated with a higher risk of death and PE, both in patients who were and were not admitted to ICU. At adjusted multivariable regression analysis, TAPSE, PAPS, and TAPSE/PAPS resulted in independently associated risk of in-hospital death (TAPSE: OR 0.85, CI 0.74-0.97; PAPS: OR 1.08, CI 1.03-1.13; TAPSE/PAPS: OR 0.02, CI 0.02 × 10-1-0.2) and PE (TAPSE: OR 0.7, CI 0.6-0.82; PAPS: OR 1.1, CI 1.05-1.14; TAPSE/PAPS: OR 0.02 × 10-1, CI 0.01 × 10-2-0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Echocardiographic evidence of RV systolic dysfunction, increased PAPS, and poor RV-arterial coupling may help to identify COVID-19 patients at higher risk of mortality and PE during hospitalization.

6.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr ; 35(3): 295-304, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 infection is known to cause a wide array of clinical chronic sequelae, but little is known regarding the long-term cardiac complications. We aim to report echocardiographic follow-up findings and describe the changes in left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) function that occur following acute infection. METHODS: Patients enrolled in the World Alliance Societies of Echocardiography-COVID study with acute COVID-19 infection were asked to return for a follow-up transthoracic echocardiogram. Overall, 198 returned at a mean of 129 days of follow-up, of which 153 had paired baseline and follow-up images that were analyzable, including LV volumes, ejection fraction (LVEF), and longitudinal strain (LVLS). Right-sided echocardiographic parameters included RV global longitudinal strain, RV free wall strain, and RV basal diameter. Paired echocardiographic parameters at baseline and follow-up were compared for the entire cohort and for subgroups based on the baseline LV and RV function. RESULTS: For the entire cohort, echocardiographic markers of LV and RV function at follow-up were not significantly different from baseline (all P > .05). Patients with hyperdynamic LVEF at baseline (>70%), had a significant reduction of LVEF at follow-up (74.3% ± 3.1% vs 64.4% ± 8.1%, P < .001), while patients with reduced LVEF at baseline (<50%) had a significant increase (42.5% ± 5.9% vs 49.3% ± 13.4%, P = .02), and those with normal LVEF had no change. Patients with normal LVLS (<-18%) at baseline had a significant reduction of LVLS at follow-up (-21.6% ± 2.6% vs -20.3% ± 4.0%, P = .006), while patients with impaired LVLS at baseline had a significant improvement at follow-up (-14.5% ± 2.9% vs -16.7% ± 5.2%, P < .001). Patients with abnormal RV global longitudinal strain (>-20%) at baseline had significant improvement at follow-up (-15.2% ± 3.4% vs -17.4% ± 4.9%, P = .004). Patients with abnormal RV basal diameter (>4.5 cm) at baseline had significant improvement at follow-up (4.9 ± 0.7 cm vs 4.6 ± 0.6 cm, P = .019). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there were no significant changes over time in the LV and RV function of patients recovering from COVID-19 infection. However, differences were observed according to baseline LV and RV function, which may reflect recovery from the acute myocardial injury occurring in the acutely ill. Left ventricular and RV function tends to improve in those with impaired baseline function, while it tends to decrease in those with hyperdynamic LV or normal RV function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Echocardiography/methods , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left , Ventricular Function, Right
7.
J Clin Med ; 10(16)2021 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376855

ABSTRACT

With stress echo (SE) 2020 study, a new standard of practice in stress imaging was developed and disseminated: the ABCDE protocol for functional testing within and beyond CAD. ABCDE protocol was the fruit of SE 2020, and is the seed of SE 2030, which is articulated in 12 projects: 1-SE in coronary artery disease (SECAD); 2-SE in diastolic heart failure (SEDIA); 3-SE in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (SEHCA); 4-SE post-chest radiotherapy and chemotherapy (SERA); 5-Artificial intelligence SE evaluation (AI-SEE); 6-Environmental stress echocardiography and air pollution (ESTER); 7-SE in repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (SETOF); 8-SE in post-COVID-19 (SECOV); 9: Recovery by stress echo of conventionally unfit donor good hearts (RESURGE); 10-SE for mitral ischemic regurgitation (SEMIR); 11-SE in valvular heart disease (SEVA); 12-SE for coronary vasospasm (SESPASM). The study aims to recruit in the next 5 years (2021-2025) ≥10,000 patients followed for ≥5 years (up to 2030) from ≥20 quality-controlled laboratories from ≥10 countries. In this COVID-19 era of sustainable health care delivery, SE2030 will provide the evidence to finally recommend SE as the optimal and versatile imaging modality for functional testing anywhere, any time, and in any patient.

9.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr ; 34(8): 819-830, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 virus, which has led to the global coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is known to adversely affect the cardiovascular system through multiple mechanisms. In this international, multicenter study conducted by the World Alliance Societies of Echocardiography, we aim to determine the clinical and echocardiographic phenotype of acute cardiac disease in COVID-19 patients, to explore phenotypic differences in different geographic regions across the world, and to identify parameters associated with in-hospital mortality. METHODS: We studied 870 patients with acute COVID-19 infection from 13 medical centers in four world regions (Asia, Europe, United States, Latin America) who had undergone transthoracic echocardiograms. Clinical and laboratory data were collected, including patient outcomes. Anonymized echocardiograms were analyzed with automated, machine learning-derived algorithms to calculate left ventricular (LV) volumes, ejection fraction, and LV longitudinal strain (LS). Right-sided echocardiographic parameters that were measured included right ventricular (RV) LS, RV free-wall strain (FWS), and RV basal diameter. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify clinical and echocardiographic parameters associated with in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: Significant regional differences were noted in terms of patient comorbidities, severity of illness, clinical biomarkers, and LV and RV echocardiographic metrics. Overall in-hospital mortality was 21.6%. Parameters associated with mortality in a multivariate analysis were age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12 [1.05, 1.22], P = .003), previous lung disease (OR = 7.32 [1.56, 42.2], P = .015), LVLS (OR = 1.18 [1.05, 1.36], P = .012), lactic dehydrogenase (OR = 6.17 [1.74, 28.7], P = .009), and RVFWS (OR = 1.14 [1.04, 1.26], P = .007). CONCLUSIONS: Left ventricular dysfunction is noted in approximately 20% and RV dysfunction in approximately 30% of patients with acute COVID-19 illness and portend a poor prognosis. Age at presentation, previous lung disease, lactic dehydrogenase, LVLS, and RVFWS were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Regional differences in cardiac phenotype highlight the significant differences in patient acuity as well as echocardiographic utilization in different parts of the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/mortality , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Comorbidity , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Survival Rate/trends
10.
Thromb Res ; 198: 34-39, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125220

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been poorly investigated. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and the correlates with the occurrence of PE as well as the association between PE and the risk of mortality in COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective multicenter study on consecutive COVID-19 patients hospitalized at 7 Italian Hospitals. At admission, all patients underwent medical history, laboratory and echocardiographic evaluation. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 224 patients (mean age 69 ± 14, male sex 62%); PE was diagnosed in 32 cases (14%). Patients with PE were hospitalized after a longer time since symptoms onset (7 IQR 3-11 days, 3 IQR 1-6 days; p = 0.001) and showed higher D-dimers level (1819 IQR 568-5017 ng/ml vs 555 IQR 13-1530 ng/ml; p < 0.001) and higher prevalence of myocardial injury (47% vs 28%, p = 0.033). At multivariable analysis, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE; HR = 0.84; 95% CI 0.66-0.98; p = 0.046) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP; HR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.03-1.23; p = 0.008) resulted the only parameters independently associated with PE occurrence. Mortality rates (50% vs 27%; p = 0.010) and cardiogenic shock (37% vs 14%; p = 0.001) were significantly higher in PE as compared with non-PE patients. At multivariate analysis PE was significant associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: PE is relatively common complication in COVID-19 and is associated with increased mortality risk. TAPSE and sPAP resulted the only parameters independently associated with PE occurrence in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary/epidemiology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Prognosis , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/epidemiology
11.
Trends Cardiovasc Med ; 31(1): 8-16, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065613

ABSTRACT

The management of patients infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may be difficult due to the need for dedicated in-hospital pathways, protective measures for healthcare professionals and isolated beds of intensive care, particularly in areas overwhelmed by wide viral spread. Although pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a variety of cardiovascular complications have been reported. An integrated diagnostic algorithm in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients with suspected cardiac involvement (laboratory findings of myocardial injury and electrocardiographic changes) may help to avoid unnecessary examinations and minimize the risk of operator infection. Due to its mobility and bedside feasibility, echocardiography is the first-line imaging technique in this clinical setting. It quickly provides information on ventricular functions, pulmonary hypertension, valve disease and pericardial effusion. In case of ST-segment elevation (STE), urgent coronary angiography should be performed. Cardiac ultrasound helps distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial disease and may detect pericardial disease. Transmural ischemic electrocardiographic changes, with or without early elevated troponin levels or echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities, will determine the need for early invasive coronary angiography. Computed tomography (CT) through its multiple applications (chest CT; CT pulmonary angiography and coronary CT angiography; late iodine enhancement CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance might be helpful in reinforcing or redirecting diagnostic hypothesis emerged by other clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings. The current pandemic makes it challenging to perform serial invasive and non-invasive diagnostic testing in COVID-19 patients and high serum troponin level. Nevertheless, thoughtful and systematic use of an appropriate multimodality imaging strategy is clinically relevant to detect cardiac injury and distinguish myocardial infarction from, myocarditis, takotsubo syndrome and pulmonary embolism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Multimodal Imaging , Cardiac Imaging Techniques , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 21(1): 23, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors including age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use, has been reported in patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who experienced adverse outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: MEDLINE, Cochrane, Web of Sciences, and SCOPUS were searched for retrospective or prospective observational studies reporting data on cardiovascular risk factors and in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. Univariable and multivariable age-adjusted analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and the occurrence of in-hospital death. RESULTS: The analysis included 45 studies enrolling 18,300 patients. The pooled estimate of in-hospital mortality was 12% (95% CI 9-15%). The univariable meta-regression analysis showed a significant association between age (coefficient: 1.06; 95% CI 1.04-1.09; p < 0.001), diabetes (coefficient: 1.04; 95% CI 1.02-1.07; p < 0.001) and hypertension (coefficient: 1.01; 95% CI 1.01-1.03; p = 0.013) with in-hospital death. Male sex and smoking did not significantly affect mortality. At multivariable age-adjusted meta-regression analysis, diabetes was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (coefficient: 1.02; 95% CI 1.01-1.05; p = 0.043); conversely, hypertension was no longer significant after adjustment for age (coefficient: 1.00; 95% CI 0.99-1.01; p = 0.820). A significant association between age and in-hospital mortality was confirmed in all multivariable models. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that older age and diabetes are associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality in patients infected by SARS-CoV-2. Conversely, male sex, hypertension, and smoking did not independently correlate with fatal outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Analysis of Variance , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Hypertension/mortality , Male , Observational Studies as Topic , Publication Bias , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Smoking/mortality
13.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 59(5): 1096-1102, 2021 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006340

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on acute and elective thoracic and abdominal aortic procedures. METHODS: Forty departments shared their data on acute and elective thoracic and abdominal aortic procedures between January and May 2020 and January and May 2019 in Europe, Asia and the USA. Admission rates as well as delay from onset of symptoms to referral were compared. RESULTS: No differences in the number of acute thoracic and abdominal aortic procedures were observed between 2020 and the reference period in 2019 [incidence rates ratio (IRR): 0.96, confidence interval (CI) 0.89-1.04; P = 0.39]. Also, no difference in the time interval from acute onset of symptoms to referral was recorded (<12 h 32% vs > 12 h 68% in 2020, < 12 h 34% vs > 12 h 66% in 2019 P = 0.29). Conversely, a decline of 35% in elective procedures was seen (IRR: 0.81, CI 0.76-0.87; P < 0.001) with substantial differences between countries and the most pronounced decline in Italy (-40%, P < 0.001). Interestingly, in Switzerland, an increase in the number of elective cases was observed (+35%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: There was no change in the number of acute thoracic and abdominal aortic cases and procedures during the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, whereas the case load of elective operations and procedures decreased significantly. Patients with acute aortic syndromes presented despite COVID-19 and were managed according to current guidelines. Further analysis is required to prove that deferral of elective cases had no impact on premature mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Asia , Elective Surgical Procedures , Europe , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
15.
ESC Heart Fail ; 2020 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777440

ABSTRACT

An 86-year-old man affected by severe aortic stenosis (AS) was referred to our institution owing to decompensated heart failure. Three months before, the patient was scheduled for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), which was postponed owing to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Owing to COVID-19 suspicion, he underwent nasopharyngeal swab and was temporarily isolated. However, the rapid deterioration of clinical and haemodynamic conditions prompted us to perform balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as bridge to TAVI. The patient's haemodynamics improved; and the next day, the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for COVID-19 was negative. At Day 5, he underwent TAVI procedure. Subsequent clinical course was uneventful. During COVID-19 pandemic, the deferral of TAVI procedure should be assessed on a case-by-case basis to avoid delay in patients at high risk for adverse events. BAV may be an option when TAVI is temporarily contraindicated such as in AS patients suspected for COVID-19.

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