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1.
Anesthesiology ; 136(5): 732-748, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite expanding use, knowledge on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support during the COVID-19 pandemic remains limited. The objective was to report characteristics, management, and outcomes of patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in France and to identify pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors associated with in-hospital mortality. A hypothesis of similar mortality rates and risk factors for COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was made. METHODS: The Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Respiratory Failure and/or Heart failure related to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus 2 (ECMOSARS) registry included COVID-19 patients supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in France. This study analyzed patients included in this registry up to October 25, 2020, and supported by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory failure with a minimum follow-up of 28 days after cannulation. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 494 extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients included in the registry, 429 were initially supported by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and followed for at least 28 days. The median (interquartile range) age was 54 yr (46 to 60 yr), and 338 of 429 (79%) were men. Management before extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation included prone positioning for 411 of 429 (96%), neuromuscular blockage for 419 of 427 (98%), and NO for 161 of 401 (40%). A total of 192 of 429 (45%) patients were cannulated by a mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation unit. In-hospital mortality was 219 of 429 (51%), with a median follow-up of 49 days (33 to 70 days). Among pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation modifiable exposure variables, neuromuscular blockage use (hazard ratio, 0.286; 95% CI, 0.101 to 0.81) and duration of ventilation (more than 7 days compared to less than 2 days; hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.83) were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Both age (per 10-yr increase; hazard ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.50) and total bilirubin at cannulation (6.0 mg/dl or more compared to less than 1.2 mg/dl; hazard ratio, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.09 to 6.5) were confounders significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital mortality was higher than recently reported, but nearly half of the patients survived. A high proportion of patients were cannulated by a mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation unit. Several factors associated with mortality were identified. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support should be considered early within the first week of mechanical ventilation initiation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Insufficiency , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies
2.
J Clin Med ; 11(5)2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732082

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thrombosis is frequent during COVID-19 disease, and thus, identifying predictive factors of hemostasis associated with a poor prognosis is of interest. The objective was to explore coagulation disorders as early predictors of worsening critical conditions in the intensive care unit (ICU) using routine and more advanced explorations. MATERIALS: Blood samples within 24 h of ICU admission for viscoelastic point-of-care testing, (VET), advanced laboratory tests: absolute immature platelet count (A-IPC), von Willebrand-GPIb activity (vWF-GpIb), prothrombin fragments 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), and the thrombin generation assay (TGA) were used. An association with worse outcomes was explored using univariable and multivariable analyses. Worsening was defined as death or the need for organ support. RESULTS: An amount of 85 patients with 33 in critical condition were included. A-IPC were lower in worsening patients (9.6 [6.4-12.5] vs. 12.3 [8.3-20.7], p = 0.02) while fibrinogen (6.9 [6.1-7.7] vs. 6.2 [5.4-6.9], p = 0.03), vWF-GpIb (286 [265-389] vs. 268 [216-326], p = 0.03) and F1 + 2 (226 [151-578] vs. 155 [129-248], p = 0.01) were higher. There was no difference observed for D-dimer, TGA or VET. SAPS-II and A-IPC were independently associated with worsening (OR = 1.11 [1.06-1.17] and OR = 0.47 [0.25-0.76] respectively). The association of a SAPS-II ≥ 33 and an A-IPC ≤ 12.6 G/L predicted the worsening of patients (sensitivity 58%, specificity 89%). CONCLUSIONS: Immature platelets are early predictors of worsening in severe COVID-19 patients, suggesting a key role of thrombopoiesis in the adaption of an organism to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-317485

ABSTRACT

Background: Evidence increases to suggest that the reallocation of health care resources during considerable the COVID-19 pandemic impacts considerably any health system. This study describes the epidemiology and the outcome of major trauma patients admitted to centers in France during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. MethodsThis retrospective observational study included all consecutive trauma patients aged 15 years and older admitted into 15 centers participating to the TraumaBase ® registry in France during the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in France. ResultsOver a 4 years-study period, 5762 patients were admitted between the first week of February and mid-June. This cohort was split between patients admitted during the first 2020 pandemic wave in France (pandemic period, 1314 patients) and those admitted during the corresponding period in the three previous years (2017-2019, 4448 patients). Patient demographics changed substantially during the pandemic and more specifically during the lockdown period specially with a reduction in both absolute numbers admitted and the proportion of road traffic accidents (348 annually 2017-2019 [55.4 % of trauma admissions] vs 143 [36.8 %] in 2020 p<0.005). Mortality during the pandemic period and the difference between predicted and observed mortality was not different compared to the non-pandemic years. ConclusionsDuring this first wave of COVID-19 in France, management of trauma patients admitted to regional Traumacenters was not significantly altered, despite medical resources being reallocated and reorganized. Mortality as well as prehospital and in hospital care remained stable throughout the period of the first pandemic wave despite a massive increase in demand for acute care beds.

4.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 40(3): 100874, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384804

ABSTRACT

We report data regarding three countries with similar healthcare systems which had three different vaccinal strategies between 1st of January and 10th of April 2021: rapid full vaccination (Israel), rapid first-dose vaccination (United Kingdom) and a delayed vaccination strategy (France).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Immunization Programs/statistics & numerical data , Brazil , COVID-19/virology , France , Humans , Immunization Programs/methods , Immunization Schedule , Israel , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , South Africa , United Kingdom
5.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 40(4): 100931, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306763

ABSTRACT

AIM: Describing acute respiratory distress syndrome patterns, therapeutics management, and outcomes of ICU COVID-19 patients and indentifying risk factors of 28-day mortality. METHODS: Prospective multicentre, cohort study conducted in 29 French ICUs. Baseline characteristics, comorbidities, adjunctive therapies, ventilatory support at ICU admission and survival data were collected. RESULTS: From March to July 2020, 966 patients were enrolled with a median age of 66 (interquartile range 58-73) years and a median SAPS II of 37 (29-48). During the first 24 h of ICU admission, COVID-19 patients received one of the following respiratory supports: mechanical ventilation for 559 (58%), standard oxygen therapy for 228 (24%) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) for 179 (19%) patients. Overall, 721 (75%) patients were mechanically ventilated during their ICU stay. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blocking agents were used in 494 (51%) and 460 (48%) patients, respectively. Bacterial co-infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia were diagnosed in 79 (3%) and 411 (43%) patients, respectively. The overall 28-day mortality was 18%. Age, pre-existing comorbidities, severity of respiratory failure and the absence of antiviral therapy on admission were identified as independent predictors of 28-day outcome. CONCLUSION: Severity of hypoxaemia on admission, older age (> 70 years), cardiovascular and renal comorbidities were associated with worse outcome in COVID-19 patients. Antiviral treatment on admission was identified as a protective factor for 28-day mortality. Ascertaining the outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients is crucial to optimise hospital and ICU resources and provide the appropriate intensity level of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial
7.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; : 100867, 2021 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202186
8.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 29(1): 51, 2021 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146699

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that the reallocation of health care resources during the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacts health care system. This study describes the epidemiology and the outcome of major trauma patients admitted to centers in France during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This retrospective observational study included all consecutive trauma patients aged 15 years and older admitted into 15 centers contributing to the TraumaBase® registry during the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in France. This COVID-19 trauma cohort was compared to historical cohorts (2017-2019). RESULTS: Over a 4 years-study period, 5762 patients were admitted between the first week of February and mid-June. This cohort was split between patients admitted during the first 2020 pandemic wave in France (pandemic period, 1314 patients) and those admitted during the corresponding period in the three previous years (2017-2019, 4448 patients). Trauma patient demographics changed substantially during the pandemic especially during the lockdown period, with an observed reduction in both the absolute numbers and proportion exposed to road traffic accidents and subsequently admitted to traumacenters (348 annually 2017-2019 [55.4% of trauma admissions] vs 143 [36.8%] in 2020 p < 0.005). The in-hospital observed mortality and predicted mortality during the pandemic period were not different compared to the non-pandemic years. CONCLUSIONS: During this first wave of COVID-19 in France, and more specifically during lockdown there was a significant reduction of patients admitted to designated trauma centers. Despite the reallocation and reorganization of medical resources this reduction prevented the saturation of the trauma rescue chain and has allowed maintaining a high quality of care for trauma patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disease Management , Pandemics/prevention & control , Registries , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
ASAIO J ; 67(2): 125-131, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054373

ABSTRACT

No study has compared patients with COVID-19-related refractory ARDS requiring veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO) to a relevant and homogenous control population. We aimed to compare the outcomes, the clinical characteristics, and the adverse effects of COVID-19 patients to a retrospective cohort of influenza patients. This retrospective case-control study was conducted in the ICUs of Lille and Rouen University Hospitals between January 2014 and May 2020. Two independent cohorts of patients with ARDS requiring V-V ECMO infected with either COVID-19 (n = 30) or influenza (n = 22) were compared. A 3-month follow-up was completed for all patients. Median age of COVID-19 and influenza patients was similar (57 vs. 55 years; p = 0.62). The 28-day mortality rate did not significantly differ between COVID-19 (43.3%) and influenza patients (50%, p = 0.63). There was no significant difference considering the cumulative incidence of ECMO weaning, hospital discharge, and 3-month survival. COVID-19 patients had a lower SAPS II score (58 [37-64] vs. 68 [52-83]; p = 0.039), a higher body mass index (33 [29-38] vs. 30 [26-34] kg/m2; p = 0.05), and were cannulated later (median delay between mechanical support and V-V ECMO 6 vs. 3 days, p = 0.004) compared with influenza patients. No difference in overall adverse events was observed between COVID-19 and influenza patients (70% vs. 95.5% respectively; p = 0.23). Despite differences in clinical presentation before V-V ECMO implantation, 28-day and 3-month mortality rate did not differ between COVID-19 and influenza patients. Considering the lack of specific treatment for COVID-19, V-V ECMO should be considered as a relevant rescue organ support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Influenza, Human/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 8(9): e23153, 2020 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critical care teams are on the front line of managing the COVID-19 pandemic, which is stressful for members of these teams. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess whether the use of social networks is associated with increased anxiety related to the COVID-19 pandemic among members of critical care teams. METHODS: We distributed a web-based survey to physicians, residents, registered and auxiliary nurses, and nurse anesthetists providing critical care (anesthesiology, intensive care, or emergency medicine) in several French hospitals. The survey evaluated the respondents' use of social networks, their sources of information on COVID-19, and their levels of anxiety and information regarding COVID-19 on analog scales from 0 to 10. RESULTS: We included 641 respondents in the final analysis; 553 (86.3%) used social networks, spending a median time of 60 minutes (IQR 30-90) per day on these networks. COVID-19-related anxiety was higher in social network users than in health care workers who did not use these networks (median 6, IQR 5-8 vs median 5, IQR 3-7) in univariate (P=.02) and multivariate (P<.001) analyses, with an average anxiety increase of 10% in social network users. Anxiety was higher among health care workers using social networks to obtain information on COVID-19 than among those using other sources (median 6, IQR 5-8 vs median 6, IQR 4-7; P=.04). Social network users considered that they were less informed about COVID-19 than those who did not use social networks (median 8, IQR 7-9 vs median 7, IQR 6-8; P<.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that social networks contribute to increased anxiety in critical care teams. To protect their mental health, critical care professionals should consider limiting their use of these networks during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Social Networking , Adult , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Medicine , Female , France/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
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