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2.
Development and Learning in Organizations ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1642469

ABSTRACT

Purpose: A substantial amount of the heavy lifting associated with getting face-to-face courses online as part of the emergency remote teaching response to the global COVID-19 pandemic has fallen, at times rather awkwardly at the feet of teachers and trainers. Teachers and trainers have had to become both learning designers, and online tutors overnight. In many instances what we have seen as part of this pivoting to online learning is the perpetuation of existing classroom based pedagogical approaches. This has, in most instances equated to the delivery of live lectures via video-conferencing software (such as Zoom and Skype), or previously recorded classroom-based lectures being reused. Design/methodology/approach: This paper explores the affordances of synchronous and asynchronous lecture video use in online learning based on the view that whilst pre-recorded videos are customary and can add added value to the online learning environment, they should be used based pedagogical pertinence, rather than through convenience or simply to save time. Findings: The pedagogical nuances of online learning and student engagement must be broadly considered, so that the formation of conditions in which learning is most likely is at the forefront. Originality/value: This is a viewpoint paper. Much of the paper is based on the views of the author – supported by references/research. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

3.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 27(2 SUPPL):794-795, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1496068

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated reduced serological response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with anti-CD20 and sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulator disease modifying therapies (DMTs). However, there are limited data on the factors affecting protective immunity. Objectives: Investigating factors affecting protective immunity in a population of patients with MS Methods: MS Patients on DMT diagnosed with COVID-19 following at least one dose of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine were identified in the Cleveland Clinic COVID-19 registry or during routine clinical care. Cases outside the registry were confirmed to have positive SARS-CoV-2 by PCR at time of diagnosis. Demographics, disease history, DMTs, comorbidities, exposures, vaccination status, and COVID-19 outcomes were collected from the registry or chart review. Additional data collection is ongoing for patients vaccinated outside the Cleveland Clinic. Results: 18 patients were identified (13 relapsing remitting, 2 secondary progressive, and 2 primary progressive MS): 13(72.2%) female, 14(77.8%) Caucasian, median age 43 years, median disease duration 12.5 years. Of the 10 patients for whom detailed vaccination data are readily available, 80% completed a full vaccination series. All received an mRNA vaccine. In the registry population, 8/629 (1.3%) fully vaccinated and 2/130 (1.5%) partially vaccinated patients tested positive for COVID- 19 after vaccination. 11(61.1%) were on anti-CD20 therapies, 5(27.1%) S1PR modulators, and 2(11.1%) dimethyl fumarate. 4 patients were hospitalized. Median length of stay was 8, range 1-15. No patients required supplemental oxygen, intubation, or ICU stay. 1 patient was discharged to a rehabilitation hospital and 3 home Conclusions: Patients treated with anti-CD20 agents and S1PR modulators still may be at risk for COVID-19 despite vaccination. While still at risk for hospitalization, intubation and death from COVID-19 appear rare. Larger studies analyzing the temporal relation between DMT administration and vaccination, and the relationship of serological response and overall protective immunity are needed to guide patient counselling.

4.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 27(2 SUPPL):562-563, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1495938

ABSTRACT

Background: Data on the effects of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease modifying therapies (DMTs) on SARS-CoV-2 vaccine response are needed. Initial studies suggest CD20 cell depleting therapies and fingolimod attenuate IgG response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in MS patients (pts), consistent with previous studies of vaccine responses in pts treated with those DMTs. Methods: Participants with MS enrolled in the MS PATHS network in the US, Germany, and Spain were asked to provide blood serum samples up to 30 days pre-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and 28-90 days post final vaccine dose. The goal is to obtain & ge;45 post-vaccination samples per approved DMT and among pts not currently treated with a DMT. Semi-quantitative measures of SARS-CoV-2 IgG response to spike protein (Siemens SARSCoV- 2 IgG assay) and nucleocapsid protein (Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgG assay) will be used to distinguish humoral responses to vaccination vs prior infection. The impact of demographic factors, MS disease subtype and duration, disability level, DMT type, vaccine type, and time since last DMT dose, and vaccine dose on IgG response will be evaluated. Results: As of May 17, 2021, 379 unique pts provided a serum sample: CD20 DMTs (n=139), S1P DMTs (n=31), natalizumab (n=39), other DMTs (n=117), and no DMT (n=53);183 pts have a pre-vaccination sample awaiting a post-vaccination sample, 186 have only a post-vaccination sample, and 10 have both. Prevaccination samples were collected at a mean (SD) of 4.5 (7.5) days prior to the first vaccine dose, and post-vaccination samples were collected 46.6 (15.2) days after the last dose, 91.8% following an mRNA vaccine. Pt (n=379) characteristics were: age 50.3 (12.5) yrs, 67% female, disease duration 16.6 (9.6) yrs, 27.7% progressive MS, and Patient Determined Disease Steps 2.0 (2.3). Reactive IgG rates (IgG index & gt;1) from initial post-vaccination testing were CD20 DMTs 21/41 (51%), S1P DMTs 4/8 (50%), and 100% for all other groups, including natalizumab (n=9), fumarates (n=8), interferons (n=8), glatiramer acetate (n=8), teriflunomide (n=2), alemtuzumab (n=1) and no DMT (n=17). Conclusions: Preliminary results, based on a limited sample size, suggest CD20 and S1P DMTs may reduce IgG response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Quantifying post-vaccination IgG response across DMTs is crucial to optimize MS management. Data from ongoing sample collection will be presented at the meeting.

5.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ; 60(10):S312, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466502

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic highlights behavioral health disparities that impact low-resource communities and make it challenging to provide evidence-based treatments to children in these settings. This Symposium presents successful strategies and data for implementing an evidence-based trauma treatment, trauma-focused CBT (TF-CBT) for children in low-resource and otherwise challenging settings. Methods: Rosaura Orengo-Aguayo, PhD, describes partnership and adaptation strategies for implementing TF-CBT in postdisaster Puerto Rico. Regan Stewart, PhD, describes strategies for implementing TF-CBT via telehealth in schools or homes. Aubrey R. Dueweke, PhD, describes strategies for implementing TF-CBT in El Salvador, and Shannon Dorsey, PhD, describes treatment outcomes and acceptability among traumatized bereaved children in Africa randomized to receive TF-CBT or usual care (UC) when training, supervision, and treatment were provided by experienced local lay counselors. All studies used the Child PTSD Symptom Scale for DSM-5 (CPSS) to evaluate improvement in PTSD symptoms from before to after TF-CBT treatment. Results: A total of 31 children in postdisaster Puerto Rico experienced large improvement in their PTSD symptoms (d = 1.94), and 70 children receiving TF-CBT via telehealth experienced significant improvement in their PTSD (d = 2.23), with low dropout rates (11.4%). A total of 121 Salvadoran children experienced significant improvement in their PTSD (d = 2.04). At posttreatment in 3 of 4 African settings, children receiving TF-CBT experienced significantly greater improvement in PTSD than those receiving UC with high acceptability;at 1-year follow-up, children in the 2 settings with greater adversities who had received TF-CBT continued to experience significantly greater improvement than those who had received UC. Marilyn B. Benoit, MD, discusses the clinical, public health, and research implications of these findings. Conclusions: Successful implementation strategies can lead to positive outcomes for trauma-impacted children receiving TF-CBT in a variety of low-resource settings. PTSD, EBP, R

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