Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604665, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933943

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We assessed the impacts of COVID-19 on multiple life domains across socio-demographic groups in Netherlands. Methods: After the first COVID-19 wave, we distributed online questionnaires among 13,031 participants of the multi-ethnic HELIUS cohort. Questionnaires contained questions on changes in income status, healthy behaviors, mental health, and access to non-COVID-19 health care. We then calculated differences in adjusted proportions of participants that reported negative changes across multiple life domains by migration background, age, sex, education, and occupation. Results: 4,450 individuals (35%) responded, of which 4,294 were included. Older populations and men seemed to be less vulnerable to negative changes in multiple life domains during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the pre-pandemic period, while populations with a migration background and lower education/occupation groups seemed to be more vulnerable to negative changes. Conclusion: Not all populations vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality are also more vulnerable to COVID-19 impacts across multiple other life domains. Targeted interventions are needed in socio-demographic groups that are most impacted by COVID-19 in various life domains to prevent a further increase of their already increased risk of chronic diseases after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethnicity , Humans , Male , Netherlands , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(6): ofac257, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922315

ABSTRACT

Background: Evidence from the United States and United Kingdom suggests that ethnic minority populations are at an increased risk for developing severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, data from other West-European countries are scarce. Methods: We analyzed data from 1439 patients admitted between February 2020 and January 2021 to 4 main hospitals in Amsterdam and Almere, the Netherlands. Differences in the risk for hospitalization were assessed by comparing demographics to the general population. Using a population-based cohort as reference, we determined differences in the association between comorbidities and COVID-19 hospitalization. Outcomes after hospitalization were analyzed using Cox regression. Results: The hospitalization risk was higher in all ethnic minority groups than in those of Dutch origin, with age-adjusted odds ratios ranging from 2.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-2.6) in Moroccans to 4.5 (95% CI, 3.2-6.0) in Ghanaians. Hypertension and diabetes were similarly associated with COVID-19 hospitalization. For all other comorbidities, we found differential associations. Intensive care unit admission and mortality during 21-day follow-up after hospitalization was comparable between ethnicities. Conclusions: The risk of COVID-19 hospitalization was higher in all ethnic minority groups compared to the Dutch, but the risk of adverse outcomes after hospitalization was similar. Our results suggest that these inequalities may in part be attributable to comorbidities that can be prevented by targeted public health prevention measures. More work is needed to gain insight into the role of other potential factors such as social determinants of health, which might have contributed to the ethnic inequalities in COVID-19 hospitalization.

3.
International journal of public health ; 67, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1870754

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We assessed the impacts of COVID-19 on multiple life domains across socio-demographic groups in Netherlands. Methods: After the first COVID-19 wave, we distributed online questionnaires among 13,031 participants of the multi-ethnic HELIUS cohort. Questionnaires contained questions on changes in income status, healthy behaviors, mental health, and access to non-COVID-19 health care. We then calculated differences in adjusted proportions of participants that reported negative changes across multiple life domains by migration background, age, sex, education, and occupation. Results: 4,450 individuals (35%) responded, of which 4,294 were included. Older populations and men seemed to be less vulnerable to negative changes in multiple life domains during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the pre-pandemic period, while populations with a migration background and lower education/occupation groups seemed to be more vulnerable to negative changes. Conclusion: Not all populations vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality are also more vulnerable to COVID-19 impacts across multiple other life domains. Targeted interventions are needed in socio-demographic groups that are most impacted by COVID-19 in various life domains to prevent a further increase of their already increased risk of chronic diseases after the pandemic.

4.
Atherosclerosis ; 341: 43-49, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Thrombosis is a major driver of adverse outcome and mortality in patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Hypercoagulability may be related to the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19, which is mainly driven by interleukin (IL)-6. Plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels increase following IL-6 upregulation and Lp(a) has anti-fibrinolytic properties. This study investigated whether Lp(a) elevation may contribute to the pro-thrombotic state hallmarking COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Lp(a), IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in 219 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and analyzed with linear mixed effects model. The baseline biomarkers and increases during admission were related to venous thromboembolism (VTE) incidence and clinical outcomes in a Kaplan-Meier and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Lp(a) levels increased significantly by a mean of 16.9 mg/dl in patients with COVID-19 during the first 21 days after admission. Serial Lp(a) measurements were available in 146 patients. In the top tertile of Lp(a) increase, 56.2% of COVID-19 patients experienced a VTE event compared to 18.4% in the lowest tertile (RR 3.06, 95% CI 1.61-5.81; p < 0.001). This association remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, IL-6 and CRP increase and number of measurements. Increases in IL-6 and CRP were not associated with VTE. Increase in Lp(a) was strongly correlated with increase in IL-6 (r = 0.44, 95% CI 0.30-0.56, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Increases in Lp(a) levels during the acute phase of COVID-19 were strongly associated with VTE incidence. The acute increase in anti-fibrinolytic Lp(a) may tilt the balance to VTE in patients hospitalized for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Humans , Lipoprotein(a) , Pilot Projects , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e045482, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096995

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Recent reports suggest a high prevalence of hypertension and diabetes in COVID-19 patients, but the role of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the clinical course of COVID-19 is unknown. We evaluated the time-to-event relationship between hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and COVID-19 outcomes. DESIGN: We analysed data from the prospective Dutch CovidPredict cohort, an ongoing prospective study of patients admitted for COVID-19 infection. SETTING: Patients from eight participating hospitals, including two university hospitals from the CovidPredict cohort were included. PARTICIPANTS: Admitted, adult patients with a positive COVID-19 PCR or high suspicion based on CT-imaging of the thorax. Patients were followed for major outcomes during the hospitalisation. CVD risk factors were established via home medication lists and divided in antihypertensives, lipid-lowering therapy and antidiabetics. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES MEASURES: The primary outcome was mortality during the first 21 days following admission, secondary outcomes consisted of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and ICU mortality. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to determine the association with CVD risk factors. RESULTS: We included 1604 patients with a mean age of 66±15 of whom 60.5% were men. Antihypertensives, lipid-lowering therapy and antidiabetics were used by 45%, 34.7% and 22.1% of patients. After 21-days of follow-up; 19.2% of the patients had died or were discharged for palliative care. Cox regression analysis after adjustment for age and sex showed that the presence of ≥2 risk factors was associated with increased mortality risk (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.02), but not with ICU admission. Moreover, the use of ≥2 antidiabetics and ≥2 antihypertensives was associated with mortality independent of age and sex with HRs of, respectively, 2.09 (95% CI 1.55 to 2.80) and 1.46 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.91). CONCLUSIONS: The accumulation of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes leads to a stepwise increased risk for short-term mortality in hospitalised COVID-19 patients independent of age and sex. Further studies investigating how these risk factors disproportionately affect COVID-19 patients are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
8.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(2): 264-268, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of individuals with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treated in hospitals that either did or did not routinely treat patients with hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine. METHODS: We analysed data of COVID-19 patients treated in nine hospitals in the Netherlands. Inclusion dates ranged from 27 February to 15 May 2020, when the Dutch national guidelines no longer supported the use of (hydroxy)chloroquine. Seven hospitals routinely treated patients with (hydroxy)chloroquine, two hospitals did not. Primary outcome was 21-day all-cause mortality. We performed a survival analysis using log-rank test and Cox regression with adjustment for age, sex and covariates based on premorbid health, disease severity and the use of steroids for adult respiratory distress syndrome, including dexamethasone. RESULTS: Among 1949 individuals, 21-day mortality was 21.5% in 1596 patients treated in hospitals that routinely prescribed (hydroxy)chloroquine, and 15.0% in 353 patients treated in hospitals that did not. In the adjusted Cox regression models this difference disappeared, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.09 (95% CI 0.81-1.47). When stratified by treatment actually received in individual patients, the use of (hydroxy)chloroquine was associated with an increased 21-day mortality (HR 1.58; 95% CI 1.24-2.02) in the full model. CONCLUSIONS: After adjustment for confounders, mortality was not significantly different in hospitals that routinely treated patients with (hydroxy)chloroquine compared with hospitals that did not. We compared outcomes of hospital strategies rather than outcomes of individual patients to reduce the chance of indication bias. This study adds evidence against the use of (hydroxy)chloroquine in hospitalised patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Hospitals/standards , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Standard of Care
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL