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1.
Resusc Plus ; 8: 100186, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590232

ABSTRACT

AIM: To perform a systematic review of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and/or defibrillation in the prone position compared to turning the patient supine prior to starting CPR and/or defibrillation. METHODS: The search included PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL Plus, and medRxiv on December 9, 2020. The population included adults and children in any setting with cardiac arrest while in the prone position. The outcomes included arterial blood pressure and end-tidal capnography during CPR, time to start CPR and defibrillation, return of spontaneous circulation, survival and survival with favorable neurologic outcome to discharge, 30 days or longer. ROBINS-I was performed to assess risk of bias for observational studies. RESULTS: The systematic review identified 29 case reports (32 individual cases), two prospective observational studies, and two simulation studies. The observational studies enrolled 17 patients who were declared dead in the supine position and reported higher mean systolic blood pressure from CPR in prone position (72 mmHg vs 48 mmHg, p < 0.005; 79 ± 20 mmHg vs 55 ± 20 mmHg, p = 0.028). One simulation study reported a faster time to defibrillation in the prone position. Return of spontaneous circulation, survival to discharge or 30 days were reported in adult and paediatric case reports. Critical risk of bias limited our ability to perform pooled analyses. CONCLUSIONS: We identified a limited number of observational studies and case reports comparing prone versus supine CPR and/or defibrillation. Prone CPR may be a reasonable option if immediate supination is difficult or poses unacceptable risks to the patient.

2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792693

ABSTRACT

Concerns regarding the physical and mental health impacts of frontline healthcare roles during the COVID-19 pandemic have been well documented, but the impacts on family functioning remain unclear. This study provides a unique contribution to the literature by considering the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on frontline healthcare workers and their families. Thirty-nine frontline healthcare workers from Victoria, Australia, who were parents to at least one child under 18 were interviewed. Data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Five superordinate and 14 subordinate themes were identified. Themes included more family time during lockdowns, but at a cost; changes in family responsibilities and routines; managing increased demands; healthcare workers hypervigilance and fear of bringing COVID-19 home to their family members; ways in which families worked to "get through it". While efforts have been made by many healthcare organisations to support their workers during this challenging time, the changes in family functioning observed by participants suggest that more could be done for this vulnerable cohort, particularly with respect to family support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Victoria/epidemiology
3.
Circulation ; 145(9): e645-e721, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714480

ABSTRACT

The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation initiated a continuous review of new, peer-reviewed published cardiopulmonary resuscitation science. This is the fifth annual summary of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations; a more comprehensive review was done in 2020. This latest summary addresses the most recently published resuscitation evidence reviewed by International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation task force science experts. Topics covered by systematic reviews in this summary include resuscitation topics of video-based dispatch systems; head-up cardiopulmonary resuscitation; early coronary angiography after return of spontaneous circulation; cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prone patient; cord management at birth for preterm and term infants; devices for administering positive-pressure ventilation at birth; family presence during neonatal resuscitation; self-directed, digitally based basic life support education and training in adults and children; coronavirus disease 2019 infection risk to rescuers from patients in cardiac arrest; and first aid topics, including cooling with water for thermal burns, oral rehydration for exertional dehydration, pediatric tourniquet use, and methods of tick removal. Members from 6 International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation task forces have assessed, discussed, and debated the quality of the evidence, according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria, and their statements include consensus treatment recommendations or good practice statements. Insights into the deliberations of the task forces are provided in Justification and Evidence-to-Decision Framework Highlights sections. In addition, the task forces listed priority knowledge gaps for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Emergency Medical Services , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Practice Guidelines as Topic
5.
Collegian ; 29(3): 281-287, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487667

ABSTRACT

Background: Most investigations of nurses' and midwives' psychological wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic have been conducted in a single setting. Aim: To assess and compare the psychological wellbeing of nurses and midwives in Australia and Denmark during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Nurses and midwives employed at four metropolitan health services in Australia and one in Denmark completed an anonymous online survey, which assessed depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms (The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - 21 Items (DASS-21)), and sociodemographic and employment factors. Findings: Completed surveys were received from 3001 nurses and midwives (1611 Australian and 1390 Danish). Overall, approximately one in seven of the nurses and midwives surveyed reported moderate to extremely severe levels of depression (n = 399, 13.5%), anxiety (n = 381, 12.9%) and stress (n = 394, 13.4%). Australian nurses' and midwives' scores on all DASS-21 subscales were significantly higher (representing higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress) than the scores for the Danish nurses and midwives. Fewer years of clinical experience, living in Australia and being employed on a part-time basis were significantly associated with higher levels of psychological distress. Discussion: A considerable proportion of nurses and midwives experienced distress during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the proportion and severity varied by country. Australian nurses and midwives experienced higher levels of distress than their Danish colleagues. Conclusion: Nurses and midwives working in countries with relatively low numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths are also likely to experience psychological distress. Nurses and midwives would benefit from targeted country-specific support and wellbeing initiatives.

6.
Collegian ; 29(3): 271-280, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487666

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly disrupted health services and their staff, including nursing and midwifery educators. Nursing and midwifery educators were tasked with meeting nurses' and midwives' rapidly-changing educational requirements, and supporting the nursing and midwifery workforce through the pandemic. Thus, nursing and midwifery educators were pivotal to the pandemic response. Aim: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing and midwifery educators across four large, multisite Australian health services. Methods: Qualitative descriptive study. All nursing and midwifery educators from public health services in Melbourne, Victoria (n = 3) and Adelaide, South Australia (n=1) were invited to participate in a semistructured interview (July - November 2020). Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed thematically. Findings: Forty-six nursing and midwifery educators participated in interviews. Across the health services, two similar themes and six sub-themes were identified. In the first theme, "Occupational impacts of COVID-19," participants described adjusting to providing education during the pandemic, managing increased workloads, concerns about not being able to carry out their usual education activities and the importance of support at work. The second theme, "Psychological impacts of COVID-19," included two sub-themes: the negative impact on participants' own mental health and difficulties supporting the mental health of other staff members. Participants from all health services identified unexpected positive impacts; online education, virtual meetings and working at home were perceived as practices to be continued postpandemic. Conclusions: Hospital-based nursing and midwifery educators demonstrated agility in adjusting to the fast-changing requirements of providing education during the pandemic. Educators would benefit from continued occupational and psychosocial support during the COVID-19 pandemic, and inclusion in discussions to inform hospitals' preparedness for managing the education of nurses and midwives during future pandemics.

7.
Australas Emerg Care ; 24(3): 186-196, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emergency clinicians have a crucial role during public health emergencies and have been at the frontline during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined the knowledge, preparedness and experiences of Australian emergency nurses, emergency physicians and paramedics in managing COVID-19. METHODS: A voluntary cross-sectional study of members of the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia, the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, and the Australasian College of Paramedicine was conducted using an online survey (June-September 2020). RESULTS: Of the 159 emergency nurses, 110 emergency physicians and 161 paramedics, 67.3-78% from each group indicated that their current knowledge of COVID-19 was 'good to very good'. The most frequently accessed source of COVID-19 information was from state department of health websites. Most of the respondents in each group (77.6-86.4%) received COVID-19 specific training and education, including personal protective equipment (PPE) usage. One-third of paramedics reported that their workload 'had lessened' while 36.4-40% of emergency nurses and physicians stated that their workload had 'considerably increased'. Common concerns raised included disease transmission to family, public complacency, and PPE availability. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive training and education and adequate support helped prepare emergency clinicians to manage COVID-19 patients. Challenges included inconsistent and rapidly changing communications and availability of PPE.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Infection Control/organization & administration , Adult , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Emergency Treatment/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data
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