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AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 219(1): 23, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561859
3.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 750650, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526771

ABSTRACT

We investigated racial disparities in a 30-day composite outcome of readmission and death among patients admitted across a 5-hospital health system following an index COVID-19 admission. A dataset of 1,174 patients admitted between March 1, 2020 and August 21, 2020 for COVID-19 was retrospectively analyzed for odds of readmission among Black patients compared to all other patients, with sequential adjustment for demographics, index admission characteristics, type of post-acute care, and comorbidities. Tabulated results demonstrated a significantly greater odds of 30-day readmission or death among Black patients (18.0% of Black patients vs. 11.3% of all other patients; Univariate Odds Ratio: 1.71, p = 0.002). Sequential adjustment via logistic regression revealed that the odds of 30-day readmission or death were significantly greater among Black patients after adjustment for demographics, index admission characteristics, and type of post-acute care, but not comorbidities. Stratification by type of post-acute care received on discharge revealed that the same disparity in odds of 30-day readmission or death existed among patients discharged home without home services, but not those discharged to home with home services or to a skilled nursing facility or acute rehab facility. Collectively, the findings suggest that weighing comorbidity burdens in post-acute care decisions may be relevant in addressing racial disparities in 30-day outcomes following discharge from an index COVID-19 admission.

4.
Methods Inf Med ; 60(1-02): 32-48, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331415

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The electronic health record (EHR) has become increasingly ubiquitous. At the same time, health professionals have been turning to this resource for access to data that is needed for the delivery of health care and for clinical research. There is little doubt that the EHR has made both of these functions easier than earlier days when we relied on paper-based clinical records. Coupled with modern database and data warehouse systems, high-speed networks, and the ability to share clinical data with others are large number of challenges that arguably limit the optimal use of the EHR OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to provide an exhaustive reference for those who use the EHR in clinical and research contexts, but also for health information systems professionals as they design, implement, and maintain EHR systems. METHODS: This study includes a panel of 24 biomedical informatics researchers, information technology professionals, and clinicians, all of whom have extensive experience in design, implementation, and maintenance of EHR systems, or in using the EHR as clinicians or researchers. All members of the panel are affiliated with Penn Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and have experience with a variety of different EHR platforms and systems and how they have evolved over time. RESULTS: Each of the authors has shared their knowledge and experience in using the EHR in a suite of 20 short essays, each representing a specific challenge and classified according to a functional hierarchy of interlocking facets such as usability and usefulness, data quality, standards, governance, data integration, clinical care, and clinical research. CONCLUSION: We provide here a set of perspectives on the challenges posed by the EHR to clinical and research users.


Subject(s)
Electronic Health Records , Health Information Systems , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans
5.
J Digit Imaging ; 34(2): 330-336, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279461

ABSTRACT

Disaster preparedness is a major but necessary undertaking for every health care facility. The 2019 coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) provided an unforeseen opportunity to compare the response of two radiology departments, University Health System A (UHSA) and University Health System B (UHSAB). Preparing for this disaster was unique since though unexpected, was thought to be detected early enough to allow for sufficient preparation. Unlike many other disasters which are short-term, single events, this has been an on-going event. Changes at both health systems included workflow alterations for exposure reduction to faculty, trainees, and staff. UHSA was able to quickly divert workflow to previously deployed home workstations, while University of Utah Health Sciences Center required 2 to 3 weeks to procure and initialize enough remote workstations to significantly affect departmental operations. Other measures such as universal masking, temperature screening at facility entrances, virtual appointments, and physical barriers were used by both systems to limit patient-to-patient, patient-to-staff, staff-to-patient, and staff-staff physical interaction to help decrease exposure risk. The goal of these preparations is to allow each department to fulfill imaging needs in support of the organizational clinical mission with the flexibility to adapt to the unique and dynamic nature of this disaster.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Humans , Informatics , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 17(11): 1358-1365, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-908299

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an illness caused by a novel coronavirus that has rapidly escalated into a global pandemic leading to an urgent medical effort to better characterize this disease biologically, clinically, and by imaging. In this review, we present the current approach to imaging of COVID-19 pneumonia. We focus on the appropriate use of thoracic imaging modalities to guide clinical management. We also describe radiologic findings that are considered typical, atypical, and generally not compatible with COVID-19. Furthermore, we review imaging examples of COVID-19 imaging mimics, such as organizing pneumonia, eosinophilic pneumonia, and other viral infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Diagnosis, Differential , Diagnostic Imaging/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography
7.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835977

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an illness caused by a novel coronavirus that has rapidly escalated into a global pandemic leading to an urgent medical effort to better characterize this disease biologically, clinically and by imaging. In this review, we present the current approach to imaging of COVID-19 pneumonia. We focus on the appropriate utilization of thoracic imaging modalities to guide clinical management. We will also describe radiologic findings that are considered typical, atypical and generally not compatible with of COVID-19 infection. Further, we review imaging examples of COVID-19 imaging mimics, such as organizing pneumonia, eosinophilic pneumonia and other viral infections.

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