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1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915535

ABSTRACT

In this study of 45 patients with COVID-19 undergoing tracheostomy, nasopharyngeal and tracheal cycle threshold (Ct) values were analyzed. Ct values rose to 37.9 by the time of tracheostomy and remained >35 postoperatively, demonstrating that persistent test positivity may not be associated with persistent transmissible virus in this population.

2.
OTO Open ; 5(4): 2473974X211059429, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has reduced the demand for, and supply of, head and neck cancer services. This study compares the times to diagnosis, staging, and treatment of head and neck cancers before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary academic medical center in New York City (NYC). METHODS: The times to diagnosis, staging, and treatment of head and neck cancer for patients presenting to the clinics of 4 head and neck oncology surgeons with newly diagnosed head and neck cancers were compared between pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 periods. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients in the pre-COVID-19 period and 26 patients in the COVID-19 period presented with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer. Patients in the COVID-19 group had a significantly longer time to diagnosis than the pre-COVID-19 group after adjustment for age and cancer diagnosis (P = .02; hazard ratio [HR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.32-0.92). Patients in the pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 groups had no statistically significant differences in time to staging (P > .9; HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.58-1.74) or time to treatment (P = .12; HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.89-2.72). CONCLUSION: This study found that time to diagnosis for head and neck cancers was delayed during a COVID-19 period compared to a pre-COVID-19 period. However, there was no evidence of delays in time to staging and time to treatment during the COVID-19 period. Our results prompt further investigations into the factors contributing to diagnostic delays but provide reassurance that despite COVID-19, patients were receiving timely staging and treatment for head and neck cancers.

3.
Laryngoscope ; 131(12): E2849-E2856, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242750

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Report long-term tracheostomy outcomes in patients with COVID-19. STUDY DESIGN: Review of prospectively collected data. METHODS: Prospectively collected data were extracted for adults with COVID-19 undergoing percutaneous or open tracheostomy between April 4, 2020 and June 2, 2020 at a major medical center in New York City. The primary endpoint was weaning from mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes included sedation weaning, decannulation, and discharge. RESULTS: One hundred one patients underwent tracheostomy, including 48 percutaneous (48%) and 53 open (52%), after a median intubation time of 24 days (IQR 20, 31). The most common complication was minor bleeding (n = 18, 18%). The all-cause mortality rate was 15% and no deaths were attributable to the tracheostomy. Eighty-three patients (82%) were weaned off mechanical ventilation, 88 patients (87%) were weaned off sedation, and 72 patients (71%) were decannulated. Censored median times from tracheostomy to sedation and ventilator weaning were 8 (95% CI 6-11) and 18 (95% CI 14-22) days, respectively (uncensored: 7 and 15 days). Median time from tracheostomy to decannulation was 36 (95% CI 32-47) days (uncensored: 32 days). Of those decannulated, 82% were decannulated during their index admission. There were no differences in outcomes or complication rates between percutaneous and open tracheostomy. Likelihood of discharge from the ICU was inversely related to intubation time, though the clinical relevance of this was small (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.943-0.998; P = .037). CONCLUSION: Tracheostomy by either percutaneous or open technique facilitated sedation and ventilator weaning in patients with COVID-19 after prolonged intubation. Additional study on the optimal timing of tracheostomy in patients with COVID-19 is warranted. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Laryngoscope, 131:E2849-E2856, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tracheostomy/methods , Aged , Airway Extubation/mortality , Airway Extubation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Conscious Sedation/mortality , Conscious Sedation/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors , Tracheostomy/mortality , Treatment Outcome , Ventilator Weaning/mortality , Ventilator Weaning/statistics & numerical data
4.
Ann Surg ; 273(3): 403-409, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066511

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the safety, efficacy, and early results of tracheostomy in patients with COVID-19 and determine whether differences exist between percutaneous and open methods. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Prolonged respiratory failure is common in symptomatic patients with COVID-19, the disease process caused by infection with the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Tracheostomy, although posing potential risk to the operative team and other healthcare workers, may be beneficial for safe weaning of sedation and ventilator support. However, short- and long-term outcomes remain largely unknown. METHODS: A prospectively collected database of patients with COVID-19 undergoing tracheostomy at a major medical center in New York City between April 4 and April 30, 2020 was reviewed. The primary endpoint was need for continued mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes included complication rates, sedation weaning, and need for intensive care unit (ICU) level of care. Patient characteristics, perioperative conditions, and outcomes between percutaneous and open groups were analyzed. RESULTS: During the study period, 67 consecutive patients underwent tracheostomy, including 48 males and 19 females with a median age of 66 years [interquartile range (IQR) 52-72]. Two surgeons alternated techniques, with 35 tracheostomies performed percutaneously and 32 via an open approach. The median time from intubation to tracheostomy was 23 days (IQR 20-26). At a median follow-up of 26 days, 52 patients (78%) no longer required mechanical ventilation and 58 patients (87%) were off continuous sedation. Five patients (7.5%) died of systemic causes. There were 11 total complications (16%) in 10 patients, most of which involved minor bleeding. There were no significant differences in outcomes between percutaneous and open methods. CONCLUSIONS: Tracheostomy under apneic conditions by either percutaneous or open technique can be safely performed in patients with respiratory failure due to COVID-19. Tracheostomy facilitated weaning from continuous intravenous sedation and mechanical ventilation. Continued follow-up of these patients to ascertain long-term outcome data is ongoing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Survival Rate , Tracheostomy/methods
5.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 18(10): 2378-2379.e1, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-457454

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an RNA virus responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).1,2 The virus enters cells via the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor, which is present in enterocytes in the ileum and colon.3 Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain, and the prevalence of GI symptoms varies greatly, with a range between 2% and 57%.4 In addition, abnormal liver chemistries are reported commonly.4 As a medical center at the forefront of the early epidemic in the United States, we seek to contribute to the growing body of literature that outlines the gastrointestinal and hepatic manifestations of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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