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1.
J Proteome Res ; 19(12): 4735-4746, 2020 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065786

ABSTRACT

According to the 2020 Metrics of the HUPO Human Proteome Project (HPP), expression has now been detected at the protein level for >90% of the 19 773 predicted proteins coded in the human genome. The HPP annually reports on progress made throughout the world toward credibly identifying and characterizing the complete human protein parts list and promoting proteomics as an integral part of multiomics studies in medicine and the life sciences. NeXtProt release 2020-01 classified 17 874 proteins as PE1, having strong protein-level evidence, up 180 from 17 694 one year earlier. These represent 90.4% of the 19 773 predicted coding genes (all PE1,2,3,4 proteins in neXtProt). Conversely, the number of neXtProt PE2,3,4 proteins, termed the "missing proteins" (MPs), was reduced by 230 from 2129 to 1899 since the neXtProt 2019-01 release. PeptideAtlas is the primary source of uniform reanalysis of raw mass spectrometry data for neXtProt, supplemented this year with extensive data from MassIVE. PeptideAtlas 2020-01 added 362 canonical proteins between 2019 and 2020 and MassIVE contributed 84 more, many of which converted PE1 entries based on non-MS evidence to the MS-based subgroup. The 19 Biology and Disease-driven B/D-HPP teams continue to pursue the identification of driver proteins that underlie disease states, the characterization of regulatory mechanisms controlling the functions of these proteins, their proteoforms, and their interactions, and the progression of transitions from correlation to coexpression to causal networks after system perturbations. And the Human Protein Atlas published Blood, Brain, and Metabolic Atlases.


Subject(s)
Proteome , Proteomics , Databases, Protein , Genome, Human , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Proteome/genetics
2.
J Pers Med ; 10(4)2020 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-908350

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented global challenge in this century. COVID-19 is a viral respiratory infection, yet the clinical characteristics of this infection differ in spinal cord injury patients from those observed in the general population. Cough and asthenia are the most frequent symptoms in this population. Moreover, infected spinal cord injury patients rarely present complications that require admission to an Intensive Care Unit, in contrast to the general population. Thus, there is a clear need to understand how COVID-19 affects spinal cord injury patients from a molecular perspective. Here, we employed an -omics strategy in order to identify variations in protein abundance in spinal cord injury patients with and without COVID-19. After a quantitative differential analysis using isobaric tags and mass spectrometry and a verification phase, we have found differences mainly related to coagulation and platelet activation. Our results suggest a key role of heparin in the response of spinal cord injury patients to COVID-19 infection, showing a significant correlation between these proteins and heparin dose. Although the number of patients is limited, these data may shed light on new therapeutic options to improve the management these patients and, possibly, those of the general population as well.

3.
Journal of Personalized Medicine ; 10(4):182, 2020.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-881797

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented global challenge in this century. COVID-19 is a viral respiratory infection, yet the clinical characteristics of this infection differ in spinal cord injury patients from those observed in the general population. Cough and asthenia are the most frequent symptoms in this population. Moreover, infected spinal cord injury patients rarely present complications that require admission to an Intensive Care Unit, in contrast to the general population. Thus, there is a clear need to understand how COVID-19 affects spinal cord injury patients from a molecular perspective. Here, we employed an -omics strategy in order to identify variations in protein abundance in spinal cord injury patients with and without COVID-19. After a quantitative differential analysis using isobaric tags and mass spectrometry and a verification phase, we have found differences mainly related to coagulation and platelet activation. Our results suggest a key role of heparin in the response of spinal cord injury patients to COVID-19 infection, showing a significant correlation between these proteins and heparin dose. Although the number of patients is limited, these data may shed light on new therapeutic options to improve the management these patients and, possibly, those of the general population as well.

4.
Front Microbiol ; 11: 2101, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-844724

ABSTRACT

Like other RNA viruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) replicates in host cells, continuously modulating the molecular environment. It encodes 28 multifunctional proteins that induce an imbalance in the metabolic and proteostatic homeostasis in infected cells. Recently, proteomic approaches have allowed the evaluation of the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human cells. Here, we discuss the current use of proteomics in three major application areas: (i) virus-protein interactomics, (ii) differential proteotyping to map the virus-induced changes in different cell types, and (iii) diagnostic methods for coronavirus infectious disease 2019 (COVID-19). Since the nasal cavity is one of the entry sites for SARS-CoV-2, we will also discuss the potential application of olfactory proteomics to provide novel insights into the olfactory dysfunction triggered by SARS-CoV-2 in patients with COVID-19.

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