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1.
European Journal of Cancer ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1803994

ABSTRACT

Introduction A significant proportion of patients with cancer who recover from COVID-19 may experience COVID-19 sequelae in the early post-infection phase, which negatively affect the continuity of care and oncological outcome. The long-term prevalence and clinical impact of post-COVID-19 syndrome in patients with cancer are largely unknown. Methods In this study, we describe the time course of COVID-19 sequelae in patients with non-advanced cancers enrolled into the OnCovid registry. Results Overall, 186 patients were included, with a median observation period of 9.9 months (95%CI:8,8-11.3) post COVID-19 resolution. After a median interval of 2.3 months post-COVID-19 (interquartile range: 1.4-3.7), 31 patients (16.6%) reported >1 sequelae, including respiratory complications (14, 7.6%), fatigue (13, 7.1%), neuro-cognitive sequelae (7, 3.8%). The vast majority of the patients were not vaccinated prior to COVID-19. COVID-19-related sequelae persisted in 9.8% and 8% of patients 6 and 12 months after COVID-19 resolution. Persistence of sequelae at first oncological follow-up was associated with history of complicated COVID-19 (45.2% vs 24.8%, p=0.0223), irrespective of oncological features at COVID-19 diagnosis. Conclusion This study confirms for the first time that, in a largely unvaccinated population, post-COVID-19 syndrome can affect a significant proportion of patients with non-advanced cancer who recovered from the acute illness. COVID-19 sequelae may persist up to 12 months in some patients, highlighting the need for dedicated prevention and supportive strategies.

2.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788513

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: 15% of patients with cancer experience symptomatic sequelae, which impair post COVID-19 outcomes. In this study we investigated whether a pro-inflammatory status is associated with the development of COVID-19 sequelae. METHODS: OnCovid recruited 2795 consecutive patients, diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection between 27/02/2020-14/02/2021. This analysis focused on COVID-19 survivors who underwent a clinical re-assessment after the exclusion of patients with haematological malignancies. We evaluated the association of inflammatory markers collected at COVID-19 diagnosis with sequelae, considering the impact of prior systemic anticancer therapy (SACT). RESULTS: Out of 1339 patients eligible, 203 experienced at least one sequela (15.2%). Median baseline C-reactive protein (CRP, 77.5 mg/L vs 22.2 mg/L, p<.001), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, 310 UI/L vs 274 UI/L, p=.028) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR, 6.0 vs 4.3, p=.001) were statistically significantly higher among patients who experienced sequelae, while no association were reported for platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and the OnCovid Inflammatory Score (OIS), which includes albumin and lymphocytes. The widest Area under the ROC curve was reported for baseline CRP (AUC 0.66,95%CI:0.63-0.69), followed by the NLR (AUC0.58,95%CI:0.55-0.61) and LDH (AUC=0.57,95%CI:0.52-0.61). Using a fixed categorical multivariable analysis high CRP (OR 2.56,95%CI:1.67-3.91) and NLR (OR 1.45,95%CI:1.01-2.10) were confirmed to be statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of sequelae. Exposure to chemotherapy was associated with a decreased risk of sequelae (OR 0.57,95%CI:0.36-0.91), while no associations with immune checkpoint inhibitors, endocrine therapy, and other types of SACT were found. CONCLUSIONS: Although the association between inflammatory status, recent chemotherapy and sequelae warrants further investigations, our findings suggest that a deranged pro-inflammatory reaction at COVID-19 diagnosis may predict for sequelae development.

3.
Transl Lung Cancer Res ; 11(2): 132-134, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737503
4.
J Thorac Oncol ; 2022 Jan 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with thoracic malignancies are at increased risk for mortality from Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and large number of intertwined prognostic variables have been identified so far. METHODS: Capitalizing data from the TERAVOLT registry, a global study created with the aim of describing the impact of COVID-19 in patients with thoracic malignancies, we used a clustering approach, a fast-backward step-down selection procedure and a tree-based model to screen and optimize a broad panel of demographics, clinical COVID-19 and cancer characteristics. RESULTS: As of April 15, 2021, 1491 consecutive evaluable patients from 18 countries were included in the analysis. With a mean observation period of 42 days, 361 events were reported with an all-cause case fatality rate of 24.2%. The clustering procedure screened approximately 73 covariates in 13 clusters. A further multivariable logistic regression for the association between clusters and death was performed, resulting in five clusters significantly associated with the outcome. The fast-backward step-down selection then identified seven major determinants of death ECOG-PS (OR 2.47 1.87-3.26), neutrophil count (OR 2.46 1.76-3.44), serum procalcitonin (OR 2.37 1.64-3.43), development of pneumonia (OR 1.95 1.48-2.58), c-reactive protein (CRP) (OR 1.90 1.43-2.51), tumor stage at COVID-19 diagnosis (OR 1.97 1.46-2.66) and age (OR 1.71 1.29-2.26). The ROC analysis for death of the selected model confirmed its diagnostic ability (AUC 0.78; 95%CI: 0.75 - 0.81). The nomogram was able to classify the COVID-19 mortality in an interval ranging from 8% to 90% and the tree-based model recognized ECOG-PS, neutrophil count and CRP as the major determinants of prognosis. CONCLUSION: From 73 variables analyzed, seven major determinants of death have been identified. Poor ECOG-PS demonstrated the strongest association with poor outcome from COVID-19. With our analysis we provide clinicians with a definitive prognostication system to help determine the risk of mortality for patients with thoracic malignancies and COVID-19.

5.
Ther Adv Med Oncol ; 13: 17588359211053416, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients are at higher risk of COVID-19 complications and mortality than the rest of the population. Breast cancer patients seem to have better prognosis when infected by SARS-CoV-2 than other cancer patients. METHODS: We report a subanalysis of the OnCovid study providing more detailed information in the breast cancer population. RESULTS: We included 495 breast cancer patients with a SARS-CoV-2 infection. Mean age was 62.6 years; 31.5% presented more than one comorbidity. The most frequent breast cancer subtype was luminal-like (n = 245, 49.5%) and 177 (35.8%) had metastatic disease. A total of 332 (67.1%) patients were receiving active treatment, with radical intent in 232 (47.6%) of them. Hospitalization rate was 58.2% and all-cause mortality rate was 20.3%. One hundred twenty-nine (26.1%) patients developed one COVID-19 complication, being acute respiratory failure the most common (n = 74, 15.0%). In the multivariable analysis, age older than 70 years, presence of COVID-19 complications, and metastatic disease were factors correlated with worse outcomes, while ongoing anticancer therapy at time of COVID-19 diagnosis appeared to be a protective factor. No particular oncological treatment was related to higher risk of complications. In the context of SARS-CoV-2 infection, 73 (18.3%) patients had some kind of modification on their oncologic treatment. At the first oncological reassessment (median time: 46.9 days ± 36.7), 255 (51.6%) patients reported to be fully recovered from the infection. There were 39 patients (7.9%) with long-term SARS-CoV-2-related complications. CONCLUSION: In the context of COVID-19, our data confirm that breast cancer patients appear to have lower complications and mortality rate than expected in other cancer populations. Most breast cancer patients can be safely treated for their neoplasm during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Oncological treatment has no impact on the risk of SARS-CoV-2 complications, and, especially in the curative setting, the treatment should be modified as little as possible.

6.
Ther Adv Urol ; 13: 17562872211054302, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Considering the growing genitourinary (GU) cancer population undergoing systemic treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, we planned a clinical audit in 24 Italian institutions treating GU malignancies. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective was investigating the clinical impact of COVID-19 in GU cancer patients undergoing ICI-based therapy during the first outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 contagion in Italy. DESIGN SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The included centers were 24 Oncology Departments. Two online forms were completed by the responsible Oncology Consultants, respectively, for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC) patients receiving at least one administration of ICIs between 31 January 2020 and 30 June 2020. RESULTS AND LIMITATION: In total, 287 mRCC patients and 130 mUC patients were included. The COVID-19 incidence was, respectively, 3.5%, with mortality 1%, in mRCC patients and 7.7%, with mortality 3.1%, in mUC patients. In both groups, 40% of patients developing COVID-19 permanently discontinued anticancer treatment. The pre-test SARS-CoV-2 probability in the subgroup of patients who underwent nasal/pharyngeal swab ranged from 14% in mRCC to 26% in mUC. The main limitation of the work was its nature of audit: data were not recorded at the single-patient level. CONCLUSION: GU cancer patients undergoing active treatment with ICIs have meaningful risk factors for developing severe events from COVID-19 and permanent discontinuation of therapy after the infection. Treatment delays due to organizational issues during the pandemic were unlikely to affect the treatment outcome in this population.

8.
Cancer Cell ; 38(5): 602-604, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970849

ABSTRACT

To understand the real impact of COVID-19 on cancer patients, an entirely new data collection effort was initiated within the Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration (TERAVOLT). TERAVOLT reported high mortality related to COVID-19 infection in thoracic cancer patients and identified several negative prognostic factors. In this commentary, we discuss the importance and limits of patient registries to support decision-making in thoracic cancer during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Global Burden of Disease/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology
9.
Ther Adv Med Oncol ; 12: 1758835920968463, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913990

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This prospective, multicentre, observational INVIDIa-2 study is investigating the clinical efficacy of influenza vaccination in advanced-cancer patients receiving immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), enrolled in 82 Italian centres, from October 2019 to January 2020. The primary endpoint was the incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) until 30 April 2020. All the ILI episodes, laboratory tests, complications, hospitalizations and pneumonitis were recorded. Therefore, the study prospectively recorded all the COVID-19 ILI events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were included in this non-prespecified COVID-19 analysis, if alive on 31 January 2020, when the Italian government declared the national emergency. The prevalence of confirmed COVID-19 cases was detected as ILI episode with laboratory confirmation of SARS-CoV-2. Cases with clinical-radiological diagnosis of COVID-19 (COVID-like ILIs), were also reported. RESULTS: Out of 1257 enrolled patients, 955 matched the inclusion criteria for this unplanned analysis. From 31 January to 30 April 2020, 66 patients had ILI: 9 of 955 cases were confirmed COVID-19 ILIs, with prevalence of 0.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.3-2.4], a hospitalization rate of 100% and a mortality rate of 77.8%. Including 5 COVID-like ILIs, the overall COVID-19 prevalence was 1.5% (95% CI: 0.5-3.1), with 100% hospitalization and 64% mortality. The presence of elderly, males and comorbidities was significantly higher among patients vaccinated against influenza versus unvaccinated (p = 0.009, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001). Overall COVID-19 prevalence was 1.2% for vaccinated (six of 482 cases, all confirmed) and 1.7% for unvaccinated (8 of 473, 3 confirmed COVID-19 and 5 COVID-like), p = 0.52. The difference remained non-significant, considering confirmed COVID-19 only (p = 0.33). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has a meaningful clinical impact on the cancer-patient population receiving ICIs, with high prevalence, hospitalization and an alarming mortality rate among symptomatic cases. Influenza vaccination does not protect from SARS-CoV-2 infection.

11.
Cancer Cell ; 37(6): 742-745, 2020 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628515

ABSTRACT

Prior publications on small subsets of cancer patients infected with SARS CoV-2 have shown an increased risk of mortality compared to the general population. Furthermore, patients with thoracic malignancies are thought to be at particularly high risk given their older age, smoking habits, and pre-existing cardio-pulmonary comorbidities. For this reason, physicians around the world have formed TERAVOLT, a global consortium dedicated to understanding the impact of COVID-19 on patients with thoracic malignancies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Registries , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Global Burden of Disease , Humans , International Cooperation , Intersectoral Collaboration , Medical Oncology/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/complications , Thoracic Neoplasms/mortality
12.
Expert Opin Biol Ther ; 20(9): 959-964, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615438

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic occurred amid the cancer immunotherapy revolution. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have become the standard of care for several solid cancers and are associated with peculiar toxicities, including pneumonitis which has similar features to COVID-19 pneumonia. AREAS COVERED: We summarize the main hallmarks of lung injury induced by ICIs and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and discuss the critical aspects for differential diagnosis and management. Symptoms and radiological findings are often similar; conversely, treatments are quite different. Furthermore, we focus on potential interactions generating hypotheses that need confirmatory studies. EXPERT OPINION: All cancer patients treated with immunotherapy should receive screening for SARS-CoV-2. This would improve the diagnosis and management of pneumonia and guide therapeutic choices. Furthermore, clinicians could estimate the risk/benefit of continuing ICI treatment in COVID-19 positive patients. Temporary withdrawal of the immunotherapy treatment pending resolution of viral infection may be a reasonable option in long-responders patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Management , Humans , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Immunotherapy/trends , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Lancet Oncol ; 21(7): 914-922, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early reports on patients with cancer and COVID-19 have suggested a high mortality rate compared with the general population. Patients with thoracic malignancies are thought to be particularly susceptible to COVID-19 given their older age, smoking habits, and pre-existing cardiopulmonary comorbidities, in addition to cancer treatments. We aimed to study the effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on patients with thoracic malignancies. METHODS: The Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration (TERAVOLT) registry is a multicentre observational study composed of a cross-sectional component and a longitudinal cohort component. Eligibility criteria were the presence of any thoracic cancer (non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC], small-cell lung cancer, mesothelioma, thymic epithelial tumours, and other pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms) and a COVID-19 diagnosis, either laboratory confirmed with RT-PCR, suspected with symptoms and contacts, or radiologically suspected cases with lung imaging features consistent with COVID-19 pneumonia and symptoms. Patients of any age, sex, histology, or stage were considered eligible, including those in active treatment and clinical follow-up. Clinical data were extracted from medical records of consecutive patients from Jan 1, 2020, and will be collected until the end of pandemic declared by WHO. Data on demographics, oncological history and comorbidities, COVID-19 diagnosis, and course of illness and clinical outcomes were collected. Associations between demographic or clinical characteristics and outcomes were measured with odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs using univariable and multivariable logistic regression, with sex, age, smoking status, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease included in multivariable analysis. This is a preliminary analysis of the first 200 patients. The registry continues to accept new sites and patient data. FINDINGS: Between March 26 and April 12, 2020, 200 patients with COVID-19 and thoracic cancers from eight countries were identified and included in the TERAVOLT registry; median age was 68·0 years (61·8-75·0) and the majority had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1 (142 [72%] of 196 patients), were current or former smokers (159 [81%] of 196), had non-small-cell lung cancer (151 [76%] of 200), and were on therapy at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis (147 [74%] of 199), with 112 (57%) of 197 on first-line treatment. 152 (76%) patients were hospitalised and 66 (33%) died. 13 (10%) of 134 patients who met criteria for ICU admission were admitted to ICU; the remaining 121 were hospitalised, but were not admitted to ICU. Univariable analyses revealed that being older than 65 years (OR 1·88, 95% 1·00-3·62), being a current or former smoker (4·24, 1·70-12·95), receiving treatment with chemotherapy alone (2·54, 1·09-6·11), and the presence of any comorbidities (2·65, 1·09-7·46) were associated with increased risk of death. However, in multivariable analysis, only smoking history (OR 3·18, 95% CI 1·11-9·06) was associated with increased risk of death. INTERPRETATION: With an ongoing global pandemic of COVID-19, our data suggest high mortality and low admission to intensive care in patients with thoracic cancer. Whether mortality could be reduced with treatment in intensive care remains to be determined. With improved cancer therapeutic options, access to intensive care should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting based on cancer specific mortality and patients' preference. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cause of Death , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/mortality , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy
14.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(4): 257-258, 2020 Apr.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-110238

ABSTRACT

We report on the protocol adopted by the Oncological Home Care Service of the Tuscany Cancer Association during the CoViD-19 pandemic. Based on the experience in home cancer care gained during the 2009 earthquake, we have developed strategies to ensure continuity of care, non-abandonment and protection of operators. In this context, the double triage protocol plays a central role, aimed at identifying patients at risk for CoViD-19 infection and rationalizing home access. we describe the protocol and present the preliminary data.


Subject(s)
Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections , Disaster Planning , Home Care Services , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Resource Allocation , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Earthquakes , Health Care Rationing , Home Care Services/standards , Home Care Services/supply & distribution , Humans , Italy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 60(1): e5-e7, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-19762

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer have an increased risk of developing severe forms of coronavirus disease 2019, and patients with advanced cancer who are followed at home represent a particularly frail population. Although with substantial differences, the challenges that cancer care professionals have to face during a pandemic are quite similar to those posed by natural disasters. We have already managed the oncological home care service in L'Aquila (middle Italy) after the 2009 earthquake. With this letter, we want to share the procedures and tools that we have started using at the home care service of the Tuscany Tumor Association during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Home Care Services , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Italy , Palliative Care/methods , Psychology, Clinical , Telemedicine/methods , Telephone , Triage
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