Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
2.
Rev. bras. enferm ; 73(supl.2):e20200499-e20200499, 2020.
Article | Grey literature | ID: grc-742712

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: to report the experience of developing pedagogical mediations in a Virtual Learning Environment implemented in a nursing faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic Methods: an experience report on the construction of a distance course aimed at graduates and residents of a nursing faculty at a public university located in the city of Rio de Janeiro Results: the course's conception, operationalization and implementation were the result of a collective work that culminated in a non-formal, virtual and problematic teaching process, which reached a participation rate of 82% of enrolled students Final considerations: even in times of social isolation, the course promoted collaborative learning of knowledge about COVID-19 and strengthened the relationship between professors and students The possibility of carrying out distance activities based on solid methodological proposals that contradict the content logic often observed in distance learning is emphasized RESUMEN Objetivo: reportar la experiencia de desarrollo de mediaciones pedagógicas en un Ambiente Virtual de Aprendizaje implementado en una facultad de enfermería durante la pandemia de COVID-19 Métodos: relato de experiencia en la construcción de un curso a distancia dirigido a estudiantes ​​y residentes de una facultad de enfermería de una universidad pública ubicada en la ciudad de Río de Janeiro Resultados: la concepción, operacionalización e implementación del curso fue el resultado de un trabajo colectivo que culminó en un proceso docente no formal, virtual y problemático, que alcanzó una tasa de participación del 82% de los estudiantes matriculados Consideraciones finales: incluso en tiempos de aislamiento social, el curso promovió el aprendizaje colaborativo de conocimientos sobre COVID-19, fortaleciendo las relaciones entre profesores y alumnos Se enfatiza la posibilidad de realizar actividades a distancia basadas en propuestas metodológicas sólidas que contradicen la lógica de contenido frecuentemente observada en Educación a Distancia RESUMO Objetivo: relatar a experiência do desenvolvimento de mediações pedagógicas em Ambiente Virtual de Aprendizagem implementadas em uma faculdade de enfermagem durante a pandemia de COVID-19 Métodos: relato de experiência da construção de um curso a distância voltado para graduandos e residentes de uma faculdade de enfermagem de uma universidade pública situada no município do Rio de Janeiro Resultados: a concepção, operacionalização e implementação do curso foi fruto de um trabalho coletivo que culminou em um processo de ensino não formal, virtual e problematizador, o qual alcançou taxa de participação de 82% dos educandos inscritos Considerações finais: mesmo em tempos de isolamento social, o curso promoveu a aprendizagem colaborativa de conhecimentos acerca da COVID-19, estreitando as relações entre docentes e educandos Ressalta-se a possibilidade de realizar atividades a distância baseadas em propostas metodológicas sólidas que contrariam a lógica conteudista frequentemente observada na Educação a Distância

3.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 73(Suppl 2): e20200499, 2020.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934355

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to report the experience of developing pedagogical mediations in a Virtual Learning Environment implemented in a nursing faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: an experience report on the construction of a distance course aimed at graduates and residents of a nursing faculty at a public university located in the city of Rio de Janeiro. RESULTS: the course's conception, operationalization and implementation were the result of a collective work that culminated in a non-formal, virtual and problematic teaching process, which reached a participation rate of 82% of enrolled students. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: even in times of social isolation, the course promoted collaborative learning of knowledge about COVID-19 and strengthened the relationship between professors and students. The possibility of carrying out distance activities based on solid methodological proposals that contradict the content logic often observed in distance learning is emphasized.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Brazil , Curriculum , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data
4.
Sustainability ; 12(21):9072, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-896279

ABSTRACT

To reduce transmission of the coronavirus, the Brazilian government adopted containment measures to control the virus’spread, including limitations to the practice of physical activity It was aimed to analyze the effects of COVID-19 quarantine on physical activity levels, energy expenditure, quality of life, and level of stress in a sample of the Brazilian population The sample included 426 participants (7 to 80 years) The International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Short form survey-36 (SF-36), and Stress Perception Scale, were used to assess the level of physical activity, quality of life and stress, respectively The anthropometric data was used to the assessment of body mass index and basal metabolic rate Body weight increased significantly in all sample (p <0 05) During the pandemic, 84% of the sample indicated a low level of physical activity Furthermore, weekly energy expenditure decreased significantly in all age groups during the pandemic (children p <0 0001;adolescents: p <0 0001;adults p <0 001, and elderly p <0 0001) All aspects of quality of life, significantly reduced in both sexes in all age groups (p <0 05) With the exception of children, stress levels increased significantly during the pandemic (adolescents: male: p = 0 003, female: p <0 05;adults: male: p = 0 003, female: p = 0 01, and elderly: male: p = 0 02, female: p = 0 03) Findings from the present study suggests that COVID-19 social isolation has negatively affected Brazilian’physical activity and quality of life

5.
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy ; 42:562-563, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-893907
6.
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy ; 42:528, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-893854
7.
Frontiers in Psychiatry ; 11, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-886464

ABSTRACT

Background: Impacts of social isolation measures imposed by COVID-19 Pandemic on mental health and quality of life of older adults living with dementia and their caregivers remain unexplored Studies have shown that psychoeducational and psychosocial interventions can manage behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD) and reduce the emotional burden on family members when applied in home-setting scenarios Method: a comprehensive systematic review of useful interventions for easing the BPSD burden in patients with dementia (PwD) and their caregivers in the context of COVID-19 quarantine was performed from January 2010 to March 2020 Results: From a total of 187 articles retrieved from electronic databases (MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane and SCOPUS), 43 studies were eligible for this review Most of the psychosocial and psychoeducational interventions described were person-centered strategies based on the cognitive-behavioral approach or informational tools to enhance care providers’ knowledge of dementia Most studies achieved successful results in handling BPSD and mood-anxiety symptoms of care providers, contributing to an overall improvement in dyad life quality Conclusion: Evidence from the last few years suggest that low-cost techniques, tailored to the dyad well-being, with increasing use of technology through friendly online platforms and application robots, can be an alternative to conventional assistance during COVID-19 Pandemic Nevertheless, the world’s current experience regarding the duration of the COVID-19 Pandemic and its effects on the cognition, behavior, and life quality of PwD will demand research on preventive and protective factors of dementia and the pursue of efficient interventions in different scenarios

8.
Preprint | Embase | ID: ppcovidwho-2219

ABSTRACT

Background: There are no known medicines or vaccines to control the COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (nCoV) Antiviral peptides are superior to conventional drugs and may also be effective against COVID-19 Hence, we investigated the SARS-CoV-2 Spike receptor-binding domain (nCoV-RBD) that interacts with hACE2 for viral attachment and entry Methods: Three strategies and bioinformatics approaches were employed to design potential nCoV-RBD - hACE2 interaction-blocking peptides that may restrict viral attachment and entry Firstly, the key residues interacting with nCoV-RBD - hACE2 are identified and hACE2 sequence-based peptides are designed Second, peptides from five antibacterial peptide databases that block nCoV-RBD are identified;finally, a chimeric peptide design approach is used to design peptides that can bind to key nCoV-RBD residues The final peptides are selected based on their physiochemical properties, numbers and positions of key residues binding, binding energy, and antiviral properties Results: We found that: (i) three amino acid stretches in hACE2 interact with nCoV-RBD;(ii) effective peptides must bind to three key positions of nCoV-RBD (Gly485he486/Asn487, Gln493, and Gln498/Thr500/Asn501);(iii) Phe486, Gln493, and Asn501 are critical residues;(iv) AC20 and AC23 derived from hACE2 may block two key critical positions;(iv) DBP6 identified from databases can block the three sites of the nCoV-RBD and interacts with one critical position, Gln498;(v) seven chimeric peptides were considered promising, among which cnCoVP-3, cnCoVP-4, and cnCoVP-7 are the tothree;and (vi) cnCoVP-4 meets all the criteria and is the best peptide Conclusions: To conclude, using three different bioinformatics approaches, we identified 17 peptides that can potentially bind to the nCoV-RBD that interacts with hACE2 Binding these peptides to nCoV-RBD may potentially inhibit the virus to access hACE2 and thereby may prevent the infection Out of 17, 10 peptides have promising potential and need further experimental validation

9.
Di Mascio, D.; Sen, C.; Saccone, G.; Galindo, A.; Grünebaum, A.; Yoshimatsu, J.; Stanojevic, M.; Kurjak, A.; Chervenak, F.; Rodríguez Suárez, M. J.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Z. M.; Baz, Mlaa; Aguilar Galán, E. V.; López, Y. C.; De León Luis, J. A.; Hernández, I. C.; Herraiz, I.; Villalain, C.; Venturella, R.; Rizzo, G.; Mappa, I.; Gerosolima, G.; Hellmeyer, L.; Königbauer, J.; Ameli, G.; Frusca, T.; Volpe, N.; Luca Schera, G. B.; Fieni, S.; Esposito, E.; Simonazzi, G.; Di Donna, G.; Youssef, A.; Della Gatta, A. N.; Di Donna, M. C.; Chiantera, V.; Buono, N.; Sozzi, G.; Greco, P.; Morano, D.; Bianchi, B.; Lombana Marino, M. G.; Laraud, F.; Ramone, A.; Cagnacci, A.; Barra, F.; Gustavino, C.; Ferrero, S.; Ghezzi, F.; Cromi, A.; Laganà, A. S.; Longo, V. L.; Stollagli, F.; Sirico, A.; Lanzone, A.; Driul, L.; Cecchini, D. F.; Xodo, S.; Rodriguez, B.; Mercado-Olivares, F.; Elkafrawi, D.; Sisti, G.; Esposito, R.; Coviello, A.; Cerbone, M.; Morlando, M.; Schiattarella, A.; Colacurci, N.; De Franciscis, P.; Cataneo, I.; Lenzi, M.; Sandri, F.; Buscemi, R.; Gattei, G.; Sala, F. D.; Valori, E.; Rovellotti, M. C.; Done, E.; Faron, G.; Gucciardo, L.; Esposito, V.; Vena, F.; Giancotti, A.; Brunelli, R.; Muzii, L.; Nappi, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Vasciaveo, L.; Liberati, M.; Buca, D.; Leombroni, M.; Di Sebastiano, F.; Di Tizio, L.; Gazzolo, D.; Franchi, M.; Ianniciello, Q. C.; Garzon, S.; Petriglia, G.; Borrello, L.; Nieto-Calvache, A. J.; Burgos-Luna, J. M.; Kadji, C.; Carlin, A.; Bevilacqua, E.; Moucho, M.; Pinto, P. V.; Figueiredo, R.; Roselló, J. M.; Loscalzo, G.; Martinez-Varea, A.; Diago, V.; Jimenez Lopez, J. S.; Aykanat, A. Y.; Cosma, S.; Carosso, A.; Benedetto, C.; Bermejo, A.; May Feuerschuette, O. H.; Uyaniklar, O.; Ocakouglu, S. R.; Atak, Z.; Gündüz, R.; Haberal, E. T.; Froessler, B.; Parange, A.; Palm, P.; Samardjiski, I.; Taccaliti, C.; Okuyan, E.; Daskalakis, G.; Moreira de Sa, R. A.; Pittaro, A.; Gonzalez-Duran, M. L.; Guisan, A. C.; Genç, ŞÖ, Zlatohlávková, B.; Piqueras, A. L.; Oliva, D. E.; Cil, A. P.; Api, O.; Antsaklis, P.; Ples, L.; Kyvernitakis, I.; Maul, H.; Malan, M.; Lila, A.; Granese, R.; Ercoli, A.; Zoccali, G.; Villasco, A.; Biglia, N.; Madalina, C.; Costa, E.; Daelemans, C.; Pintiaux, A.; Yapar Eyi, E. G.; Cueto, E.; Hadar, E.; Dollinger, S.; Brzezinski Sinai, N. A.; Huertas, E.; Arango, P.; Sanchez, A.; Schvartzman, J. A.; Cojocaru, L.; Turan, S.; Turan, O.; Di Dedda, M. C.; Molpeceres, R. G.; Zdjelar, S.; Premru-Srsen, T.; Cerar, L. K.; Druškovič, M.; De Robertis, V.; Stefanovic, V.; Nupponen, I.; Nelskylä, K.; Khodjaeva, Z.; Gorina, K. A.; Sukhikh, G. T.; Maruotti, G. M.; Visentin, S.; Cosmi, E.; Ferrari, J.; Gatti, A.; Luvero, D.; Angioli, R.; Puri, L.; Palumbo, M.; D'Urso, G.; Colaleo, F.; Chiara Rapisarda, A. M.; Carbone, I. F.; Mollo, A.; Nazzaro, G.; Locci, M.; Guida, M.; Di Spiezio Sardo, A.; Panici, P. B.; Berghella, V.; Flacco, M. E.; Manzoli, L.; Bifulco, G.; Scambia, G.; Zullo, F.; D'Antonio, F..
J Perinat Med ; 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-797424

ABSTRACT

Objectives To evaluate the strength of association between maternal and pregnancy characteristics and the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnancies with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 Methods Secondary analysis of a multinational, cohort study on all consecutive pregnant women with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from February 1, 2020 to April 30, 2020 from 73 centers from 22 different countries A confirmed case of COVID-19 was defined as a positive result on real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay of nasal and pharyngeal swab specimens  The primary outcome was a composite adverse fetal outcome, defined as the presence of either abortion (pregnancy loss before 22 weeks of gestations), stillbirth (intrauterine fetal death after 22 weeks of gestation), neonatal death (death of a live-born infant within the first 28 days of life), and perinatal death (either stillbirth or neonatal death) Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate parameters independently associated with the primary outcome Logistic regression was reported as odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) Results Mean gestational age at diagnosis was 30 6±9 5 weeks, with 8 0% of women being diagnosed in the first, 22 2% in the second and 69 8% in the third trimester of pregnancy There were six miscarriage (2 3%), six intrauterine device (IUD) (2 3) and 5 (2 0%) neonatal deaths, with an overall rate of perinatal death of 4 2% (11/265), thus resulting into 17 cases experiencing and 226 not experiencing composite adverse fetal outcome Neither stillbirths nor neonatal deaths had congenital anomalies found at antenatal or postnatal evaluation Furthermore, none of the cases experiencing IUD had signs of impending demise at arterial or venous Doppler Neonatal deaths were all considered as prematurity-related adverse events Of the 250 live-born neonates, one (0 4%) was found positive at RT-PCR pharyngeal swabs performed after delivery The mother was tested positive during the third trimester of pregnancy The newborn was asymptomatic and had negative RT-PCR test after 14 days of life At logistic regression analysis, gestational age at diagnosis (OR: 0 85, 95% CI 0 8-0 9 per week increase;p<0 001), birthweight (OR: 1 17, 95% CI 1 09-1 12 7 per 100 g decrease;p=0 012) and maternal ventilatory support, including either need for oxygen or CPAP (OR: 4 12, 95% CI 2 3-7 9;p=0 001) were independently associated with composite adverse fetal outcome Conclusions Early gestational age at infection, maternal ventilatory supports and low birthweight are the main determinants of adverse perinatal outcomes in fetuses with maternal COVID-19 infection Conversely, the risk of vertical transmission seems negligible

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL