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3.
Gastrointest Endosc ; 94(2): 436-437, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310668
4.
Gut ; 71(1): 229-230, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266389
6.
Endosc Int Open ; 9(3): E438-E442, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108929

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims The need for hospital beds during the COVID-19 pandemic almost overwhelmed the health care systems all over the world. Therefore, elective non-life-saving procedures were postponed. We decided to perform all colorectal endoscopic mucosal dissections (ESDs) for challenging lesions as outpatient procedures, organizing an ad hoc path to management of any delayed post-procedural complications. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of outpatient ESD for colorectal tumors. Patients and methods From March 2020 to May 2020, outpatient colorectal ESDs were performed for 15 challenging lesions. We retrospectively investigated feasibility and safety of the procedures, rates of en bloc resection, and complications rates. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.5 years and 40 % of the them were on antiplatelet/anticoagulation therapy. Median size of removed lesions was 45 mm (range 32-77) and 38 mm (range 24 to 55) Five patients (33 %) had rectal tumors extending to the dentate line and four (26.6 %) were recurrences on a scar of previous endoscopic or surgical local resections. All complications, such as bleeding or visible microperforation, were managed endoscopically and no delayed perforations occurred. One patient had fever (37.5 °C), while three patients complained of anal pain after ESD for a rectal tumor that extended to the dentate line (RTDL); all patients were managed conservatively. Conclusion Outpatient colorectal ESD is feasible and safe for challenging lesions. It reduces costs of hospitalization but direct access to the endoscopy service to manage potential post-ESD complications should always be guaranteed.

7.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 8(1)2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102175

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although evidence suggests frequent gastrointestinal (GI) involvement during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), endoscopic findings are scarcely reported. AIMS: We aimed at registering endoscopic abnormalities and potentially associated risk factors among patients with COVID-19. METHODS: All consecutive patients with COVID-19 undergoing endoscopy in 16 institutions from high-prevalence regions were enrolled. Mann-Whitney U, χ2 or Fisher's exact test were used to compare patients with major abnormalities to those with negative procedures, and multivariate logistic regression to identify independent predictors. RESULTS: Between February and May 2020, during the first pandemic outbreak with severely restricted endoscopy activity, 114 endoscopies on 106 patients with COVID-19 were performed in 16 institutions (men=70.8%, median age=68 (58-74); 33% admitted in intensive care unit; 44.4% reporting GI symptoms). 66.7% endoscopies were urgent, mainly for overt GI bleeding. 52 (45.6%) patients had major abnormalities, whereas 13 bled from previous conditions. The most prevalent upper GI abnormalities were ulcers (25.3%), erosive/ulcerative gastro-duodenopathy (16.1%) and petechial/haemorrhagic gastropathy (9.2%). Among lower GI endoscopies, 33.3% showed an ischaemic-like colitis.Receiver operating curve analysis identified D-dimers >1850 ng/mL as predicting major abnormalities. Only D-dimers >1850 ng/mL (OR=12.12 (1.69-86.87)) and presence of GI symptoms (OR=6.17 (1.13-33.67)) were independently associated with major abnormalities at multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: In this highly selected cohort of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 requiring endoscopy, almost half showed acute mucosal injuries and more than one-third of lower GI endoscopies had features of ischaemic colitis. Among the hospitalisation-related and patient-related variables evaluated in this study, D-dimers above 1850 ng/mL was the most useful at predicting major mucosal abnormalities at endoscopy. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrial.gov (ID: NCT04318366).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastric Mucosa/pathology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Colitis, Ischemic/etiology , Colitis, Ischemic/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Duodenum/pathology , Female , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/etiology , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stomach Ulcer/etiology , Stomach Ulcer/pathology
8.
Gut ; 70(9): 1629-1631, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013058

ABSTRACT

The risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in endoscopy is not only between patients and endoscopy staff but is also through inadequately reprocessed endoscopes. There are no studies that could confirm the efficacy of current ways of endoscope reprocessing on the elimination of SARS-CoV-2. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of high disinfection of endoscopes with peracetic acid on eliminating SARS-CoV-2, but surprisingly we found that the virus cannot be detected on any part of endoscopes used in critically ill patients due to SARS-CoV-2 and this was the same for all types of endoscopies and procedures. If confirmed in larger studies, these findings will probably open a new scenario in the overall understanding of the real impact of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Disinfectants , Disinfection , Endoscopes, Gastrointestinal/virology , Equipment Contamination , Peracetic Acid , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies
9.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol ; 13: 1756284820980671, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999579

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unprecedented situation caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has profoundly affected endoscopic practice in regard to access, volume, and workflow. We aimed to assess the potential changes in the technical outcomes of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures carried out in patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We conducted an international, multicenter, retrospective, matched case-control study of ERCP procedures carried out in patients with confirmed COVID-19. The main outcome was technical success of the procedure as assessed by the endoscopist, and the secondary outcome was the development of procedure-related adverse events. Each case was matched in a 1:4 ratio with controls extracted from each center's database in order to identify relevant changes in outcome measures compared with the pre-pandemic era. RESULTS: Eighteen procedures performed in 16 COVID-19 patients [14 men, 65 years (9-82)] and 67 controls were included in the final analysis. Technical success was achieved in 14/18 COVID-19 cases, which was significantly lower as compared with the control group (14/18 versus 64/67, p = 0.034), with an endoscopic reintervention required in 9/18 cases. However, the rate of procedure-related adverse events was low in both groups (1/18 versus 10/67, p = 0.44). On multivariable analysis, COVID-19 status remained the only risk factor for technical failure of the procedure [odds ratio of 19.9 (95% confidence interval 1.4-269.0)]. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the volume and practice of ERCP, resulting in lower technical success rates without significantly impacting patient safety. Prioritizing cases and following recommendations on safety measures can ensure good outcome with minimal risk in dedicated centers.

10.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol ; 13: 1756284820965070, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-853110

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has changed the way we work, and health care services have to adapt. The use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and the delay of non-urgent procedures were the immediate measures adopted by Gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy Units at the time of crisis. As the peak has now passed in most countries, GI facilities are facing the next challenge of this pandemic: service providers must adapt their routine work to a 'new normal'. Routine casework must resume, and waiting lists must be addressed: all in the awareness of the ongoing potential risks of COVID-19, and the threat of a second wave. In this review, we discuss strategies to manage the workload by improving procedure appropriateness and prioritization, whilst maintaining a 'COVID-free' environment. This includes monitoring of an adequate stock of PPE and the implications for the staff's workload, and the GI trainees' need of training.

11.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol ; 13: 1756284820935187, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-853109

ABSTRACT

On 31 December 2019, the WHO China Country Office was informed of cases of pneumonia of unknown etiology detected in Wuhan (Hubei Province of China). In January 2020, a new coronavirus named SARS-CoV2 was isolated and, since that time, SARS-CoV2 related disease (COVID-19) rapidly spread all over the world becoming pandemic in March 2020. The COVID-19 outbreak dramatically affected the public-health and the health-care facilities organization. Bilio-pancreatic endoscopy is considered a high-risk procedure for cross-contamination and, even though it is not directly involved in COVID-19 diagnosis and management, its reorganization is crucial to guarantee high standards of care minimizing the risk of SARS-CoV2 transmission among patients and health-care providers. Bilio-pancreatic endoscopic procedures often require a short physical distance between the endoscopist and the patient for a long period of time, a frequent exchange of devices, the involvement of a large number of personnel, the use of complex endoscopes difficult to reprocess. On this basis, endoscopic units should take precautions with adjusted management of bilio-pancreatic endoscopy. The aim of this article is to discuss the approach to bilio-pancreatic endoscopy in the COVID-19 era with focus on diagnostic algorithms, indications, management of the endoscopic room, proper use of Personal Protective Equipment and correct reprocessing of instrumentation.

13.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 26(9): 1306-1314, 2020 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684619

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has a direct impact on the gastrointestinal system, as up to 50% of fecal samples from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients contain detectable viral RNA despite a negative rhino-pharyngeal swab. This finding, together with an intestinal expression of angiotensin conversion enzyme 2 protein, suggests a possible fecal-oral transmission for SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in COVID-19 patients including watery diarrhea, vomiting-particularly in children-nausea, and abdominal pain. Pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection presents significant similarities to those of some immune-mediated diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases or rheumatoid arthritis, leading to the hypothesis that targeted therapies used for the treatment of immune-mediated disease could be effective to treat (and possibly prevent) the main complications of COVID-19. In this review, we synthesize the present and future impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the gastrointestinal system and on gastroenterology practice, hypothesizing a potential role of the "gut-lung axis" and perhaps of the gut and lung microbiota into the interindividual differential susceptibility to COVID-19 19 disease. Finally, we speculate on the reorganization of outpatient gastroenterology services, which need to consider, among other factors, the major psychological impact of strict lockdown measures on the whole population.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Feces/virology , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Gastrointest Endosc ; 92(3): 519-523, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-125251

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The abrupt outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 and its rapid spread over many healthcare systems throughout the world has led to a shortage in personal protective equipment (PPE), which cannot be solved by reducing their use or by increasing production. It is thus necessary to promote PPE rational use, highlighting possible differences in terms of efficacy and promoting an effective technique to reuse them. METHODS: A literature search was performed on PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane database, and Google Scholar, and from the 25 top cited articles, 15 were selected for relevance and impact. RESULTS: Most studies on previous respiratory virus epidemics to date suggest surgical masks are not inferior compared with N95 respirators in terms of protective efficacy among healthcare workers. Therefore, the use of N95 respirators should be limited to high-risk situations. Concerning respirator reuse, highly energetic, short-wave, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) at 254 nm was determined to decontaminate N95 respirators from viral respiratory agents, but UVGI requires careful consideration of the type of respirator and of the biologic target. CONCLUSIONS: Rational use and successful reuse of respirators can help in the shortage of PPE during a pandemic. Further studies testing UVGI and other decontamination techniques are an unmet need. The definitive answer to pandemic issues can be found in artificial intelligence and deep learning. These groundbreaking modalities could help in identifying high-risk patients and in suggesting appropriate types and use of PPE.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Decontamination , Equipment Reuse , Masks , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Respiratory Protective Devices , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultraviolet Rays
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