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1.
BJOG ; 129(7): 1084-1094, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846148

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of maternal coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on prematurity, birthweight and obstetric complications. DESIGN: Nationwide, population-based retrospective cohort study. SETTING: National Programme de Médicalisation des Systèmes d'Information database in France. POPULATION: All single births from March to December 2020: 510 387 deliveries, including 2927 (0.6%) with confirmed COVID-19 in the mother and/or the newborn. METHODS: The group with COVID-19 was compared with the group without COVID-19 using the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test, and the Student's t test or Mann-Whitney U test. Logistic regressions were used to study the effect of COVID-19 on the risk of prematurity or macrosomia (birthweight ≥4500 g). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prematurity less than 37, less than 28, 28-31, or 32-36 weeks of gestation; birthweight; obstetric complications. RESULTS: In singleton pregnancies, COVID-19 was associated with obstetric complications such as hypertension (2.8% versus 2.0%, p < 0.01), pre-eclampsia (3.6% versus 2.0%, p < 0.01), diabetes (18.8% versus 14.4%, p < 0.01) and caesarean delivery (26.8% versus 19.7%, p < 0.01). Among pregnant women with COVID-19, there was more prematurity between 28 and 31 weeks of gestation (1.3% versus 0.6%, p < 0.01) and between 32 and 36 weeks of gestation (7.7% versus 4.3%, p < 0.01), and more macrosomia (1.0% versus 0.7%, p = 0.04), but there was no difference in small-for-gestational-age newborns (6.3% versus 8.7%, p = 0.15). Logistic regression analysis for prematurity showed an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 1.77 (95% CI 1.55-2.01) for COVID-19. For macrosomia, COVID-19 resulted in non-significant aOR of 1.38 (95% CI 0.95-2.00). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is a risk factor for prematurity, even after adjustment for other risk factors. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: The risk of prematurity is twice as high in women with COVID-19 after adjustment for factors usually associated with prematurity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Birth Weight , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Fetal Macrosomia/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Multivariate Analysis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(24)2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572372

ABSTRACT

Few studies have investigated the link between SARS-CoV-2 and health restrictions and its effects on the health of lung cancer (LC) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic on surgical activity volume, postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality (IHM) for LC resections in France. All data for adult patients who underwent pulmonary resection for LC in France in 2020, collected from the national administrative database, were compared to 2018-2019. The effect of SARS-CoV-2 on the risk of IHM and severe complications within 30 days among LC surgery patients was examined using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities and type of resection. There was a slight decrease in the volume of LC resections in 2020 (n = 11,634), as compared to 2018 (n = 12,153) and 2019 (n = 12,227), with a noticeable decrease in April 2020 (the peak of the first wave of epidemic in France). We found that SARS-CoV-2 (0.43% of 2020 resections) was associated with IHM and severe complications, with, respectively, a sevenfold (aOR = 7.17 (3.30-15.55)) and almost a fivefold (aOR = 4.76 (2.31-9.80)) increase in risk. Our study suggests that LC surgery is feasible even during a pandemic, provided that general guidance protocols edited by the surgical societies are respected.

3.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 298, 2021 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526637

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study assessed the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on overall hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) in France in comparison with previous years, and by COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 status. METHODS: Hospitalization data (2017-2020) were extracted from the French National Discharge database (all public and private hospitals). We included all patients older than 18 years hospitalized during the 3 years and extracted PE status and COVID-19 status (from March 2020). Age, sex and risk factors for PE (such as obesity, cancer) were identified. We also extracted transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital death. The number of PE and the frequency of death in patients in 2019 and 2020 were described by month and by COVID-19 status. Logistic regressions were performed to identify the role of COVID-19 among other risk factors for PE in hospitalized patients. RESULTS: The overall number of patients hospitalized with PE increased by about 16% in 2020 compared with 2019, and mortality also increased to 10.3% (+ 1.2%). These increases were mostly linked to COVID-19 waves, which were associated with PE hospitalization in COVID-19 patients (PE frequency was 3.7%; 2.8% in non-ICU and 8.8% in ICU). The final PE odds ratio for COVID-19 hospitalized patients was 4 compared with other hospitalized patients in 2020. The analyses of PE in non-COVID-19 patients showed a 2.7% increase in 2020 compared with the previous three years. CONCLUSION: In 2020, the overall number of patients hospitalized with PE in France increased compared to the previous three years despite a considerable decrease in scheduled hospitalizations. Nevertheless, proactive public policy focused on the prevention of PE in all patients should be encouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies
4.
Child Abuse Negl ; 122: 105299, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In France, the COVID-19 pandemic led to a general lockdown from mid-March to mid-May 2020, forcing families to remain confined. We hypothesized that children may have been victims of more physical abuse during the lockdown, involving an increase in the relative frequency of hospitalization. METHODS: Using the national administrative database on all admissions to public and private hospitals (PMSI), we selected all children aged 0-5 years hospitalized and identified physically abused children based on ICD-10 codes. We included 844,227 children hospitalized in March-April 2017-2020, of whom 476 (0.056%) were admitted for physical abuse. Relative frequency of hospitalization for physical abuse observed in March to April 2020 were compared with those from the same months in the three previous years (2017-2019). FINDINGS: Even if absolute number of children exposed to physical abuse did not fluctuate significantly, we found a significant increase in the relative frequency of young children hospitalized for physical abuse from 2017 (0.053%) to 2020 (0.073%). Compared with the 2017-2019 period, and considering the observed decrease in the number of overall hospital admissions during the first lockdown, the number of children exposed to physical violence was 40% superior to what would be expected. INTERPRETATION: The sharp increase in the relative frequency of hospitalizations for physical abuse in children aged 0-5 years in France is alarming. As only the most severe cases were brought to the hospital for treatment during the lockdown, our figures probably only represent the tip of the iceberg of a general increase of violence against young children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Abuse , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Eur Respir J ; 58(6)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238699

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Influenza epidemics were initially considered to be a suitable model for the COVID-19 epidemic, but there is a lack of data concerning patients with chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs), who were supposed to be at risk of severe forms of COVID-19. METHODS: This nationwide retrospective cohort study describes patients with prior lung disease hospitalised for COVID-19 (March-April 2020) or influenza (2018-2019 influenza outbreak). We compared the resulting pulmonary complications, need for intensive care and in-hospital mortality depending on respiratory history and virus. RESULTS: In the 89 530 COVID-19 cases, 16.03% had at least one CRD, which was significantly less frequently than in the 45 819 seasonal influenza patients. Patients suffering from chronic respiratory failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension were under-represented, contrary to those with lung cancer, sleep apnoea, emphysema and interstitial lung diseases. COVID-19 patients with CRDs developed significantly more ventilator-associated pneumonia and pulmonary embolism than influenza patients. They needed intensive care significantly more often and had a higher mortality rate (except for asthma) when compared with patients with COVID-19 but without CRDs or patients with influenza. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with prior respiratory diseases were globally less likely to be hospitalised for COVID-19 than for influenza, but were at higher risk of developing severe COVID-19 and had a higher mortality rate compared with influenza patients and patients without a history of respiratory illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(6)2021 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143460

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Several smaller studies have shown that COVID-19 patients with cancer are at a significantly higher risk of death. Our objective was to compare patients hospitalized for COVID-19 with cancer to those without cancer using national data and to study the effect of cancer on the risk of hospital death and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. (2) Methods: All patients hospitalized in France for COVID-19 in March-April 2020 were included from the French national administrative database, which contains discharge summaries for all hospital admissions in France. Cancer patients were identified within this population. The effect of cancer was estimated with logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex and comorbidities. (3) Results: Among the 89,530 COVID-19 patients, we identified 6201 cancer patients (6.9%). These patients were older and were more likely to be men and to have complications (acute respiratory and kidney failure, venous thrombosis, atrial fibrillation) than those without cancer. In patients with hematological cancer, admission to ICU was significantly more frequent (24.8%) than patients without cancer (16.4%) (p < 0.01). Solid cancer patients without metastasis had a significantly higher mortality risk than patients without cancer (aOR = 1.4 [1.3-1.5]), and the difference was even more marked for metastatic solid cancer patients (aOR = 3.6 [3.2-4.0]). Compared to patients with colorectal cancer, patients with lung cancer, digestive cancer (excluding colorectal cancer) and hematological cancer had a higher mortality risk (aOR = 2.0 [1.6-2.6], 1.6 [1.3-2.1] and 1.4 [1.1-1.8], respectively). (4) Conclusions: This study shows that, in France, patients with COVID-19 and cancer have a two-fold risk of death when compared to COVID-19 patients without cancer. We suggest the need to reorganize facilities to prevent the contamination of patients being treated for cancer, similar to what is already being done in some countries.

8.
Stroke ; 52(4): 1362-1369, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102249

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In France, the entire population was put under a total lockdown from March 17 to May 11, 2020 during the peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Whether the lockdown had consequences on the management of medical emergencies such as stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) has yet to be fully evaluated. This article describes hospitalization rates for acute stroke in 2 French regions that experienced contrasting rates of COVID-19 infection, before, during, and after the nationwide lockdown (January to June 2020). METHODS: All patients admitted for acute stroke/TIA into all public and private hospitals of the 2 study regions were included. Data were retrieved from the National Hospitalization Database (PMSI). In the most affected region (Grand-Est), the hospitalization rates observed in April 2020 were compared with the rates in the same period in the least affected region (Occitanie) and in the 3 prior years (2017-2019). RESULTS: There was a significant decline in hospitalization rates for stroke/TIA within the region most affected by COVID-19 during the month of April 2020 compared with previous years, while no significant change was seen in the least affected region. After lockdown, we observed a fast rebound in the rate of hospitalization for stroke/TIA in the most affected region, contrasting with a slower rebound in the least affected region. In both regions, patients with COVID-19 stroke more frequently had ischemic stroke, a nonsignificant greater prevalence of diabetes, they were less frequently admitted to stroke units, and mortality was higher than in patients without COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrates a significant drop in stroke/TIA hospitalizations and a fast recovery after the end of the French lockdown in the most affected region, while the least affected region saw a nonsignificant drop in stroke/TIA hospitalizations and a slow recovery. These results and recommendations could be used by the health authorities to prepare for future challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Pandemics , Stroke/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/therapy
9.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(3): 251-259, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, influenza epidemics have been considered suitable for use as a model for the COVID-19 epidemic, given that they are respiratory diseases with similar modes of transmission. However, data directly comparing the two diseases are scarce. METHODS: We did a nationwide retrospective cohort study using the French national administrative database (PMSI), which includes discharge summaries for all hospital admissions in France. All patients hospitalised for COVID-19 from March 1 to April 30, 2020, and all patients hospitalised for influenza between Dec 1, 2018, and Feb 28, 2019, were included. The diagnosis of COVID-19 (International Classification of Diseases [10th edition] codes U07.10, U07.11, U07.12, U07.14, or U07.15) or influenza (J09, J10, or J11) comprised primary, related, or associated diagnosis. Comparisons of risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes between patients hospitalised for COVID-19 and influenza were done, with data also stratified by age group. FINDINGS: 89 530 patients with COVID-19 and 45 819 patients with influenza were hospitalised in France during the respective study periods. The median age of patients was 68 years (IQR 52-82) for COVID-19 and 71 years (34-84) for influenza. Patients with COVID-19 were more frequently obese or overweight, and more frequently had diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia than patients with influenza, whereas those with influenza more frequently had heart failure, chronic respiratory disease, cirrhosis, and deficiency anaemia. Patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 more frequently developed acute respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism, septic shock, or haemorrhagic stroke than patients with influenza, but less frequently developed myocardial infarction or atrial fibrillation. In-hospital mortality was higher in patients with COVID-19 than in patients with influenza (15 104 [16·9%] of 89 530 vs 2640 [5·8%] of 45 819), with a relative risk of death of 2·9 (95% CI 2·8-3·0) and an age-standardised mortality ratio of 2·82. Of the patients hospitalised, the proportion of paediatric patients (<18 years) was smaller for COVID-19 than for influenza (1227 [1·4%] vs 8942 [19·5%]), but a larger proportion of patients younger than 5 years needed intensive care support for COVID-19 than for influenza (14 [2·3%] of 613 vs 65 [0·9%] of 6973). In adolescents (11-17 years), the in-hospital mortality was ten-times higher for COVID-19 than for influenza (five [1·1% of 458 vs one [0·1%] of 804), and patients with COVID-19 were more frequently obese or overweight. INTERPRETATION: The presentation of patients with COVID-19 and seasonal influenza requiring hospitalisation differs considerably. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is likely to have a higher potential for respiratory pathogenicity, leading to more respiratory complications and to higher mortality. In children, although the rate of hospitalisation for COVID-19 appears to be lower than for influenza, in-hospital mortality is higher; however, low patient numbers limit this finding. These findings highlight the importance of appropriate preventive measures for COVID-19, as well as the need for a specific vaccine and treatment. FUNDING: French National Research Agency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Influenza, Human/mortality , Orthomyxoviridae , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/virology , Child , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Factual , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Morbidity , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Seasons
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