Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 43(1): e1-e10, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605122

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has greatly affected health-care provision across the globe. Management of chronic ailments has become challenging because of the strained health-care resources and social distancing measures that prevent on-site clinical visits and treatments. Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a debilitating, chronic disease characterized by unpredictable swelling attacks in various parts of the body. Controlling HAE symptoms often requires long-term prophylactic medication use and regular medical care; however, limited scientific information has been published about HAE medical care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Objective: To gather patient and health-care professional (HCP) perspectives on the global impact that COVID-19 has had, and the future impact it will have on HAE medical care and to identify differences in perceptions across economic and geographic boundaries. Methods: We conducted two independent but similar online global surveys to capture patient and HCP perspectives on the impact that COVID-19 has had, and the future impact it will have on HAE medical care. Results: Both patients and HCPs globally reported that the pandemic has limited the availability of HAE medical care, and they expect the restrictions to continue far beyond the pandemic. In addition, the results of our study suggested that telehealth use has increased across the globe but has been more successfully implemented in high-income countries. Conclusion: Patients and HCPs expect that HAE-related care will be negatively impacted by the pandemic for many years. Disparities in medical care and technologic infrastructure may exacerbate these challenges in non-high-income countries. Supportive tools and global infrastructure should be established to provide aid to non-high-income countries throughout the pandemic and several years after.


Subject(s)
Angioedemas, Hereditary , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Angioedemas, Hereditary/diagnosis , Angioedemas, Hereditary/epidemiology , Angioedemas, Hereditary/therapy , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Pulm Ther ; 7(1): 1-7, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222815

ABSTRACT

The Editorial Board have prepared a podcast describing their experiences over the past year of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Editorial Board describe how COVID-19 impacted their research and how the initial clinical response changed over the course of the year in terms of treatment, personal protective equipment (PPE), and policy changes. The podcast and transcript can be viewed below the abstract of the online version of the manuscript. Alternatively, the podcast and transcript can be downloaded here: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.14402291 Pulmonary Therapy Podcast-COVID-19: Research and Real-World Experiences from the Editorial Board (MP4 160260 KB).

3.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 9(1): 1-6.e1, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-899065

ABSTRACT

As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic, medical trainees have faced unique challenges and uncertainties. To capture the experiences of allergy and immunology fellows throughout the United States and Canada during this time, a 17-item electronic questionnaire was distributed to 380 fellow-in-training (FIT) members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology enrolled in US and Canadian allergy/immunology fellowship programs. Voluntary and anonymous responses were collected from April 15 to May 15, 2020. In addition to summary statistics, categorical data were compared using χ2 tests (Fisher's exact). Responses were obtained from FITs across all years of training and primary specialties (Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Medicine-Pediatrics) with a response rate of 32.6% (124 of 380). Reassignment to COVID-19 clinical responsibilities was reported by 12% (15 of 124) of FITs, with the largest proportion in the US northeast region. A majority of FITs used telehealth (95%) and virtual learning (82%) during the pandemic. Overall, 21% (25 of 120) of FITs expressed concern about potentially lacking clinical experience for independently practicing allergy and immunology. However, FITs using telehealth reported lower concern compared with those who did not (18.4% [21 of 114] vs 66.7% [4 of 6]; P = .01). The survey shows that allergy and immunology trainee experiences have varied considerably since the COVID-19 outbreak. Notably, the adoption of telehealth and virtual learning was commonly reported, and optimization of these virtual experiences will be helpful. Even outside of pandemics, training on the use of telemedicine may be a sound strategy in preparation for future health care delivery and unexpected events.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology/education , Allergy and Immunology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States
4.
Pulm Ther ; 6(2): 169-176, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-267295

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 presentation may include a profound increase in cytokines and associated pneumonia, rapidly progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This so-called cytokine storm often leads to refractory edema, respiratory arrest, and death. At present, anti-IL-6, antiviral therapy, convalescent plasma, hydroxychloroquine, and azithromycin among others are being investigated as potential treatments for COVID-19. As the disease etiology and precise therapeutic interventions are still not definitively defined, we wanted to review the roles that complement and the contact system may have in either the treatment or pathogenesis of the disease. METHODS: We searched the recent literature (PubMed) on complement and coronavirus; contact system and coronavirus; bradykinin and coronavirus; and angiotensin receptor and coronavirus. The manuscript complies with ethics guidelines and was deemed exempt from institutional review board approval according to Human Subjects Protection Office guidelines. RESULTS: Mouse models are available for the study of coronavirus and complement. Although complement is effective in protecting against many viruses, it does not seem to be protective against coronavirus. C3 knockout mice infected with SARS-CoV had less lung disease than wild-type mice, suggesting that complement may play a role in coronavirus pathogenesis. Some evidence suggests that the observed pulmonary edema may be bradykinin-induced and could be the reason that corticosteroids, antihistamines, and other traditional interventions for edema are not effective. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a co-receptor for SARS-CoV-2, and studies thus far have not concluded a benefit or risk associated with the use of either ACE-inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Activation of complement and the contact system, through generation of bradykinin, may play a role in the SARS-CoV-2-induced pulmonary edema, and our search suggests that further work is necessary to confirm our suspicions.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL