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1.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-591-S-592, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967332

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Ozanimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor S1P1 and S1P5 modulator, is approved in the United States for moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) and in multiple countries for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe COVID-19 outcomes in ozanimod-treated UC or MS patients in active phase 3 open-label extension studies. Methods: A database search identified COVID-19 infection reports in ozanimodtreated patients with UC in the True North open-label extension and MS in the DAYBREAK open-label extension. The analysis period was November 1, 2019 to either August 31, 2021 (UC) or May 10, 2021 (MS). The last COVID-19 event from all patients with ³1 event was analyzed. Results: Among 2792 ozanimod-treated patients with UC or MS, 258 developed COVID-19 (confirmed: 215);thus, the incidence in these clinical trial settings was 9.2% during the analysis periods. Most patients with confirmed cases (193/215 [89.8%]) had nonserious infections not requiring hospitalization or meeting other International Conference on Harmonisation criteria for a serious event. Of 611 ozanimod-treated patients with UC, 68 (11.1%) developed COVID-19 (confirmed: 55;Figure 1). A majority of UC patients with confirmed cases (45/55 [81.8%]) had nonserious COVID-19;most (54/55 [98.2%]) recovered (2 with sequalae) and 1 was recovering at data cutoff. One UC patient with confirmed COVID-19 discontinued ozanimod (1.8%), 23 temporarily interrupted it (41.8%), and 31 had no change to treatment (56.4%). No COVID-19-related deaths were reported in UC patients. Of 2181 ozanimod-treated pts with MS, 190 (8.7%) developed COVID-19 (confirmed: 160;Figure 2). Most MS patients with confirmed COVID-19 (148/160 [92.5%]) had nonserious cases;most (158/160 [98.8%]) recovered (5 with sequelae) (Figure 1). No MS patients with confirmed cases discontinued ozanimod, 61 temporarily interrupted it (38.1%), and 99 had no change to treatment (61.9%). Outcomes in 13 additional UC patients (Figure 1) and 30 additional MS patients (Figure 2) with suspected COVID-19 were similar to those with confirmed cases. There were 3 COVID-19-related deaths in the MS program. Conclusion: In the UC and MS open-label extension studies, most patients with confirmed COVID-19 had nonserious infections, recovered, and did not require ozanimod discontinuation. There were 3 deaths in MS patients (case-fatality rate 1.6% in MS, 1.2% overall). (Figure Presented)(Figure Presented)

4.
Journal of Crohn's and Colitis ; 16:i452, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1722338

ABSTRACT

Background: Ozanimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor S1P1 and S1P5 modulator, is approved in the United States for moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) and in multiple countries for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe COVID-19 outcomes in ozanimod-treated UC or MS patients (pts) in active phase 3 openlabel extension (OLE) studies. Methods: A database search identified COVID-19 infection reports in ozanimod-treated pts with UC in the True North OLE and MS in the DAYBREAK OLE. The analysis period was November 1, 2019 to either August 31, 2021 (UC) or May 10, 2021 (MS). The last COVID-19 event from all pts with ≥1 event was analyzed. Results: Among 2792 ozanimod-treated pts with UC or MS, 258 developed COVID-19 (confirmed: 215);thus, the incidence in these clinical trial settings was 9.2% during the analysis periods. Most pts with confirmed cases (193/215 [89.8%]) had nonserious infections not requiring hospitalization or meeting other International Conference on Harmonisation criteria for a serious event. Of 611 ozanimod-treated pts with UC, 68 (11.1%) developed COVID-19 (confirmed: 55;Fig 1). A majority of UC pts with confirmed cases (45/55 [81.8%]) had nonserious COVID-19;most (54/55 [98.2%]) recovered (2 with sequalae) and 1 was recovering at data cutoff. One UC pt with confirmed COVID-19 discontinued ozanimod (1.8%), 23 temporarily interrupted it (41.8%), and 31 had no change to treatment (56.4%). No COVID-19-related deaths were reported in UC pts. Of 2181 ozanimod-treated pts with MS, 190 (8.7%) developed COVID-19 (confirmed: 160;Fig 2). Most MS pts with confirmed COVID-19 (148/160 [92.5%]) had nonserious cases;most (158/160 [98.8%]) recovered (5 with sequelae) (Fig 1). No MS pts with confirmed cases discontinued ozanimod, 61 temporarily interrupted it (38.1%), and 99 had no change to treatment (61.9%). Outcomes in 13 additional UC pts (Fig 1) and 30 additional MS pts (Fig 2) with suspected COVID-19 were similar to those with confirmed cases. There were 3 COVID-19-related deaths in the MS program. One pt died from a presumed pulmonary embolism;this pt had received high-dose corticosteroids for MS relapse immediately before COVID-19 symptom onset. Another pt died from suspected COVID-19-related respiratory failure. One tetraplegic, cachectic pt died from a lung abscess following COVID-19 infection. Conclusion: In the UC and MS OLE studies, most pts with confirmed COVID-19 had nonserious infections, recovered, and did not require ozanimod discontinuation. There were 3 deaths in MS patients (casefatality rate 1.6% in MS, 1.2% overall).

5.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 27(2 SUPPL):797-798, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1496057

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Per WHO, >190 million people worldwide have been affected by COVID-19 as of 20-Jul-2021. Although people with MS are not at a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, factors such as age, comorbidity, MS severity and treatment with DMTs may affect COVID-19 severity and outcomes. Understanding the risks, severity and outcomes of COVID-19 in people with MS receiving DMTs, including anti-CD20 DMTs, is important to healthcare practitioners (HCPs) managing MS. Objectives: To report the characteristics and outcomes of COVID- 19 adverse events (AEs) in relapsing MS (RMS) patients taking ofatumumab enrolled in the ongoing, open-label, long-term extension Phase 3b ALITHIOS study and from post-marketing surveillance of people receiving ofatumumab 20 mg subcutaneously. Methods: Patient demographics, baseline characteristics, incidence of COVID-19 AEs, seriousness category (including hospitalization), severity, outcomes, ofatumumab exposure before the start of infection, and action taken with ofatumumab were assessed. Results: As of 29-Jan-2021, 139/1703 (8.2%) patients enrolled in ALITHIOS (mean±SD age at baseline: 37.7±8.7 years;female, 64%) treated with ofatumumab reported COVID-19 AEs (confirmed: 115 [82.7%];suspected: 24 [17.3%]). Of these, 10 (7.2%) experienced COVID-19 serious AEs and all 10 (7.2%) were hospitalized. Most AEs reported were mild (Grade [G] 1;69 [49.6%]) or moderate (G2;62 [44.6%]) in severity. Severe (G3) and life threatening (G4) AEs were reported in 6 (4.3%) and 2 (1.4%) patients, respectively. One (0.7%) patient (48-year-old at COVID- 19 onset;BMI 28.3 kg/m2;recent MS relapse) with confirmed COVID-19 and pneumonia had a fatal outcome. At data cut-off, most patients (128 [92.1%]) had recovered from COVID-19 AEs;2 (1.4%) were recovering, 4 (2.9%) had recovered with sequelae and 4 (2.9%) had not recovered. COVID-19 AEs led to temporary interruption of ofatumumab in 22 (15.8%) patients. As of 31-Jan- 2021, an additional 28 RMS patients with COVID-19 AEs were identified in the Novartis safety database. Further details to be presented. Conclusions: In ALITHIOS, 139 RMS patients on ofatumumab reported COVID-19 AEs (as of 31-Jan-2021). Most (94%) COVID-19 cases were mild or moderate in severity. There were few hospitalizations but one fatal outcome. At data cut-off, most (92%) patients had recovered/resolved from COVID-19. ALITHIOS data extends the understanding of the long-term safety profile of ofatumumab in people living with MS.

6.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 27(2 SUPPL):158-160, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1495981

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Inebilizumab is approved in the USA and Japan for aquaporin 4 immunoglobulin (Ig)G seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Objective: Report final safety and efficacy data from the N-MOmentum trial of inebilizumab in NMOSD. Methods: Participants with NMOSD (aged 18+, EDSS score of ≤8, recent history of attacks) were randomized 3:1 to inebilizumab or placebo monotherapy for 28 weeks or up to attack occurrence;the randomized controlled period (RCP). Primary outcome was time to adjudicated attack. Participants could then enter the inebilizumab open label period (OLP). Final study data are presented, including attack risk and safety outcomes. Results: Of the 230 participants randomized and dosed, 216 (93.9%) entered and 174 (80.6%) completed the OLP. In the RCP, 87.0% were attack free with inebilizumab and 59.9% with placebo (72.8% risk reduction, p<0.001). In the OLP, 87.7% were attackfree in those continuing inebilizumab and 83.4% in those switched from placebo. Regardless of randomization, 225 participants received inebilizumab. Mean (SD) treatment duration was 3.2 (1.4) years;36.8% were treated for >4 years (maximum of 5.5 years). Total exposure was 730.36 person-years (py) with an annualized attack rate of 0.092;40/63 (63.5%) attacks occurred in the first year. Treatment-emergent adverse events (AE) were reported by 89 (39.6%) participants, most frequently urinary tract infection (26.2%), nasopharyngitis (20.9%) and arthralgia (17.3%). Infusion-related reactions with inebilizumab occurred in 28 (12.9%) participants (rate per 100-py: whole study, 11.1;RCP, 37.6). The rate (95% confidence interval) of infections per 100-py did not increase with continued treatment: year 1, 116.3 (102.4-131.6);year 2, 68.1 (57.2-80.6);year 3, 61.9 (50.3-75.5);year 4, 55.1 (41.7-71.4). 105 participants had transient low IgG (<700 mg/dL) during treatment, but no correlations were found between the worst IgG, IgM or IgA levels recorded and the occurrence of any infection or an infection ≥ grade 3 (Fisher exact test, all p>0.05). Three trial participants died: one from complications of NMOSD attack, one from a CNS event of unclear etiology and one due to COVID-19, after 9, 224 and 1225 days of inebilizmab treatment, respectively. Conclusions. During the 5.5 years of N-MOmentum, the risk of attack in participants receiving inebilizumab remained low with no evidence of unexpected serious adverse events, including serious infection.

7.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal ; 26(3_SUPPL):50-50, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1008319
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