Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Economic Analysis and Policy ; 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1433153

ABSTRACT

Although some countries are gradually returning to production and life, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect the world, further motivating recovery policies. Using a global computable general equilibrium (CGE) model, this study evaluates the environmental and economic impacts of COVID-19 on the world, both today and in the longer term. This study explores the post-pandemic impacts conditional on varied fiscal policies (including forgone revenue and additional spending) and their combination with a carbon tax. This study finds that the pandemic shocks in 2020 slowed regional economies worldwide, and a continued pandemic in 2021 will further stymie economic activity. Among the government’s recovery policies, indirect tax reduction has the best positive stimulus to regional economies;however, it is not conducive to low-carbon energy development and will also lead to an increase in CO2 and pollutant emissions. A post-pandemic green recovery plan could prioritize replacing indirect production taxes with taxes on GHG emissions, which would both improve economic turnover metrics and reduce environmental emissions in 2021. In the long run, this tax shift will not only minimize the economic damage to the global economy but also help governments around the world to get back on track in meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement.

2.
Energy Policy ; 155:112349, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1233418

ABSTRACT

New Energy Vehicles (NEVs), and especially electric cars, are rapidly changing the outlook of the car industry in China, the largest vehicle market in the world. However, an adjustment in subsidy schemes and breakout of COVID-19 appear to slow down the uptake of NEVs in the Chinese market. This raises the question of whether, other less costly, policy instruments can help the transformation towards cleaner vehicles. With the understanding that public support and user acceptance play a key role, we ask whether NEVs as part of increasingly popular car-sharing mode can gain further support, the increased uptake of new energy vehicles. To investigate this question, we perform an online survey, retrieving 1583 questionnaires, and scrutinize the perception of NEVs at the nexus with car-sharing. Relying on the Theory of Planned Behavior and ordered logistic regression model, we demonstrate that attitudes towards environmental protection and perceived benefits (economic and safety) play a key role in accelerating the adoption of shared electric cars. NEVs promotion policies need to specifically target groups by regions. Municipal agencies can substantially support NEV uptake by providing on-street parking exclusively for shared NEVs in cities, and information on the economic and social benefits of NEVs in rural areas.

3.
J Hypertens ; 39(6): 1077-1089, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219489

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic considerably affects health, wellbeing, social, economic and other aspects of daily life. The impact of COVID-19 on blood pressure (BP) control and hypertension remains insufficiently explored. We therefore provide a comprehensive review of the potential changes in lifestyle factors and behaviours as well as environmental changes likely to influence BP control and cardiovascular risk during the pandemic. This includes the impact on physical activity, dietary patterns, alcohol consumption and the resulting consequences, for example increases in body weight. Other risk factors for increases in BP and cardiovascular risk such as smoking, emotional/psychologic stress, changes in sleep patterns and diurnal rhythms may also exhibit significant changes in addition to novel factors such as air pollution and environmental noise. We also highlight potential preventive measures to improve BP control because hypertension is the leading preventable risk factor for worldwide health during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension/epidemiology , Life Style , Stress, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Smoking , Socioeconomic Factors
4.
Nature Climate Change ; 11(3):193-196, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1117346

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to strongly affect global energy systems. Global power sector CO2 emissions have shown a substantial decline, thanks to (a) the COVID-19-induced economic downturn and resulting reduction of electricity demand and (b) a decrease of carbon intensity of power generation as coal generation is decreased most strongly. These effects illustrate the opportunity for different policies to support a structural and accelerating decline of power sector emissions.The societal response to the pandemic has reduced global power demand, disproportionally affecting coal power generation and thus leading to a strong CO2 emissions decline. Policy should apply 2020’s lessons to ensure that power sector emissions have peaked in 2018 and go into structural decline.

5.
Nat. Clim. Change ; 7(10): 647-653, 20200701.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-989824

ABSTRACT

Government policies during the COVID-19 pandemic have drastically altered patterns of energy demand around the world. Many international borders were closed and populations were confined to their homes, which reduced transport and changed consumption patterns. Here we compile government policies and activity data to estimate the decrease in CO2emissions during forced confinements. Daily global CO2emissions decreased by –17% (–11 to –25% for ±1σ) by early April 2020 compared with the mean 2019 levels, just under half from changes in surface transport. At their peak, emissions in individual countries decreased by –26% on average. The impact on 2020 annual emissions depends on the duration of the confinement, with a low estimate of –4% (–2 to –7%) if prepandemic conditions return by mid-June, and a high estimate of –7% (–3 to –13%) if some restrictions remain worldwide until the end of 2020. Government actions and economic incentives postcrisis will likely influence the global CO2emissions path for decades.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL