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1.
Estudios Geograficos ; 83(293), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2280559

ABSTRACT

In recent years, the interest in media representations of migrants and the media as a space for participation has increased within the field of migration studies. Yet, most scholars' attention is focused on immigrants and the media in destination countries, while less attention is paid to origin countries and emigrants' representation. Taking advantage of the increased attention paid to migrants and migration during the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, we investigated the media representations of Romanian migrants in agriculture who work in other European countries and interpreted how their voices could be heard through media accounts. Through content analysis, we investigated a sample of 297 articles published between 1st April and 31st May 2020 on the websites of the six most visible Romanian media outlets. This study contributes to the existing knowledge on media representations of Romanian migrants by documenting a series of tendencies, including an event-oriented approach, oversimplified representations of migration, massification and schematisation of migrant representations, and the high sensitivity to reports from destination countries' media on Romanian migrants. Our analysis reveals that the approach taken to reporting on migration during the COVID-19 pandemic, at least during its first phase, highly depended on the existing, institutionalised modes of media reporting on migration. Copyright © 2022 CSIC.

2.
ESMO Open ; 7(3): 100499, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821235

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: ESMO COVID-19 and CAncer REgistry (ESMO-CoCARE) is an international collaborative registry-based, cohort study gathering real-world data from Europe, Asia/Oceania and Africa on the natural history, management and outcomes of patients with cancer infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). PATIENTS AND METHODS: ESMO-CoCARE captures information on patients with solid/haematological malignancies, diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Data collected since June 2020 include demographics, comorbidities, laboratory measurements, cancer characteristics, COVID-19 clinical features, management and outcome. Parameters influencing COVID-19 severity/recovery were investigated as well as factors associated with overall survival (OS) upon SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: This analysis includes 1626 patients from 20 countries (87% from 24 European, 7% from 5 North African, 6% from 8 Asian/Oceanian centres), with COVID-19 diagnosis from January 2020 to May 2021. Median age was 64 years, with 52% of female, 57% of cancer stage III/IV and 65% receiving active cancer treatment. Nearly 64% patients required hospitalization due to COVID-19 diagnosis, with 11% receiving intensive care. In multivariable analysis, male sex, older age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status ≥2, body mass index (BMI) <25 kg/m2, presence of comorbidities, symptomatic disease, as well as haematological malignancies, active/progressive cancer, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) ≥6 and OnCovid Inflammatory Score ≤40 were associated with COVID-19 severity (i.e. severe/moderate disease requiring hospitalization). About 98% of patients with mild COVID-19 recovered, as opposed to 71% with severe/moderate disease. Advanced cancer stage was an additional adverse prognostic factor for recovery. At data cut-off, and with median follow-up of 3 months, the COVID-19-related death rate was 24.5% (297/1212), with 380 deaths recorded in total. Almost all factors associated with COVID-19 severity, except for BMI and NLR, were also predictive of inferior OS, along with smoking and non-Asian ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Selected patient and cancer characteristics related to sex, ethnicity, poor fitness, comorbidities, inflammation and active malignancy predict for severe/moderate disease and adverse outcomes from COVID-19 in patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Neoplasms , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S1133, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432861

ABSTRACT

Background: At the height of the first wave of the SARS-COV-2 pandemic, ESMO mobilized to accelerate research for the understanding of COVID-19 in cancer patients (pts). ESMO CoCARE is an international collaborative registry-based, cohort study, gathering real-world data and information from healthcare professionals about the natural history, treatment and outcomes of COVID-19 in cancer pts. Methods: ESMO CoCARE captures information on pts with any solid or hematologic malignancy (including cancer survivors free of disease for ≥5 years) presenting with a COVID-19 diagnosis in any of the participating centers. Data collected since 06/2020 include demographics, cancer characteristics and status, co-morbidities, COVID-19 clinical features, course, management and outcome. Factors influencing COVID-19 severity (hospitalization +/- ICU support needed) and recovery are investigated using multivariable logistic regression with backward elimination method. The study is ongoing. Results: The current analysis includes 1551 registered pts (19 countries;87% pts from 23 European centers, 7% and 6% pts from 5 Northern African and 7 Asian centers), with COVID-19 diagnosis as of 11/03/2021. Median age was 64 years, with the majority female (52%), cancer stage III/IV (58%), and on active cancer treatment (60%). 65% had severe COVID-19 requiring hospitalization, with 11% receiving intensive care. In multivariable analysis, in addition to demographics (male gender, older age, other ethnicity than Caucasian, lower BMI), co-morbidities and symptomatic COVID-19, severe disease was associated to higher ECOG PS (Odds Ratio (OR)2 vs 0=5.9, OR1 vs 0=2.1), hematological malignancies (OR hemvs solid =2.0), and active/progressive cancer status (OR progressivevs no evidence of disease =1.6). 98% of pts with mild disease recovered, as opposed to only 70% of those with severe disease. Cancer stage was an additional prognostic factor for recovery (ORI/II vs IV =3.4). Conclusions: Demographic characteristics, type and status of cancer, and symptomatology of COVID-19 increase the probability of severe disease, while advanced cancer stage is also associated with the risk of death. Legal entity responsible for the study: Institut Curie, Paris, France. Funding: ESMO - European Society for Medical Oncology. Disclosure: E. Romano: Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding, Investigator-initiated trial: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding, Investigator-initiated trial: BMS;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Pierre Fabre. R. Lee: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: BMS. A. Croitoru: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Ipsen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Astellas;Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Funding: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Funding: Merck;Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Funding: Astellas;Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Funding: Servier;Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Funding: Five Prime Therapeutics;Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Funding: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Travel funding: Merck;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel funding: Servier;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel funding: Roche. S. Susnjar: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria and/or advisory fees: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria and/or advisory fees: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria and/or advisory fees: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria and/or advisory fees: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria and/or advisory fees: Amicus. M. Rossi: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel and personal fees: Novartis;Financial terests, Personal, Other, travel and personal fees: Ipsen. O.A. Michielin: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, personal fees: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, personal fees: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, personal fees: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, personal fees: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, personal fees: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, personal fees: NeraCare GmbH. G. Pentheroudakis: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: AbbVie;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Amgen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator, Coordinating PI: Amgen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Boehringer Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Boehringer Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Debbiopharm;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Enorasis;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Genekor;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Ipsen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Ipsen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Janssen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Lilly;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Merck;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Merck;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: MSD;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: MSD;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator, Coodinating Pi: Servier;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Servier. S. Peters: Consultation / Advisory role: AbbVie, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Beigene, Biocartis, Bio Invent, Blueprint Medicines, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Clovis, Daiichi Sankyo, Debiopharm, Eli Lilly, Elsevier, F. Hoffmann-La Roche/Genentech, Foundation Medicine, Illumina, Incyte, IQVIA, Janssen, Medscape, Merck Sharp and Dohme, Merck Serono, Merrimack, Mirati, Novartis, PharmaMar, Phosplatin Therapeutics, Pfizer, Regeneron, Sanofi, Seattle Genetics, Takeda, Vaccibody. Talk in a company’s organized public event: AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, e-cancer, Eli Lilly, F. Hoffmann-La Roche/Genentech, Illumina, Medscape, Merck Sharp and Dohme, Novartis, PER, Pfizer, Prime, RTP, Sanofi, Takeda. Receipt of grants/research supports: (Sub)investigator in trials (institutional financial support for clinical trials) sponsored by Amgen, AstraZeneca, Biodesix, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Clovis, F. Hoffmann-La Roche/Genentech, GSK, Illumina, Lilly, Merck Sharp and Dohme, Merck Serono, Mirati, Novartis, and Pfizer, Phosplatin Therapeutics. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

4.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277730

ABSTRACT

SARS-COV2 infection is a challenge for the clinician, not only in the acute phase, in which the impairment of the patient's respiratory function can occur and evolve surprisingly quickly, but also in the post-acute phase, when the patient, especially the one who needed support long-term ventilator, requires complex recovery of respiratory, motor, neurological and cardiac functions. We present the case of a 60-year-old patient, diagnosed with a severe form of SARS COV2 infection for which he needed ventilatory support for 20 days, as well as antiviral treatment, systemic corticosteroid, anticoagulant and antibiotic. After 20 days from the first positive RT-PCR test, the patient is considered cured in terms of SARS COV2 infection, but severe respiratory failure requires transfer to the Pulmonology Department of the Marius Nasta Institute for further treatment. Upon admission to the ward, the patient has hypotrophy and hypotonia in the limb muscles, resting dyspnea, bilaterally diminished vesicular murmur, bilateral subcrepitant rales, SaO2 = 72% in aa and rest, 90% with oxygen supplement 8/min. Starting with the 10th day of hospitalization respiratory physiotherapy is initiated. The rehabilitation of the patient is also supported through exercises for the upper limbs with dumbbells, walking with frame support and breathing exercises with incentive spirometers. After 30 days of systemic corticosteroid therapy, anticoagulant treatment and respiratory physiotherapy, the patient was able to make the daily activities, the spirometry reveals a moderate restrictive syndrom;after 60 days the respiratory function was normal. Conclusion: The management of patients after severe SARS-COV 2 infection in order to improve and maintain the quality of life requires a long time care and multidisciplinary team consisting in pulmonologist, respiratory therapist, nurse, cardiology specialist.

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