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1.
Respir Med ; 200: 106925, 2022 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914971

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to examine how the COVID-19 pandemic changed e-cigarette user habits and risk perceptions. A nationally distributed 52-item questionnaire assessed nicotine e-cigarette use, perceptions, COVID-19 diagnosis, demographic data, and vaping habits among respondents aged 16-96 years (n = 565). Questions were developed in-house to assess vaping habits of users and risk perceptions of nicotine containing e-cigarette users and non-users both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Seventy-six percent of non-users believed that e-cigarette use would lead to worse COVID-19 symptoms, compared to 40% of e-cigarette users (P < 0.001). Twenty-eight percent of non-users also believed that e-cigarette users were more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2, versus 11% of e-cigarette users (P < 0.001). Fifty-eight percent of e-cigarette users described themselves as making no change in their e-cigarette usage, 10% decreased e-cigarette use, and 32% increased e-cigarette use during the pandemic. Twenty-five percent of users switched to vaping non-socially during the pandemic (P < 0.001). Sixty-seven percent of e-cigarette users replied that they would decrease or stop vaping if diagnosed with COVID and 31% said they would continue (P < 0.001). These findings reveal there are large differences in risk perception of e-cigarette use between users and non-users. Additionally, our findings characterize the habits of e-cigarette users during the COVID-19 pandemic, revealing users report steady to increased use, more caution in social settings, and would reduce usage if diagnosed with COVID-19.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(3): 479-489, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased inflammation has been well defined in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), while definitive pathways driving severe forms of this disease remain uncertain. Neutrophils are known to contribute to immunopathology in infections, inflammatory diseases, and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in COVID-19. Changes in neutrophil function in COVID-19 may give insight into disease pathogenesis and identify therapeutic targets. METHODS: Blood was obtained serially from critically ill COVID-19 patients for 11 days. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation (NETosis), oxidative burst, phagocytosis, and cytokine levels were assessed. Lung tissue was obtained immediately postmortem for immunostaining. PubMed searches for neutrophils, lung, and COVID-19 yielded 10 peer-reviewed research articles in English. RESULTS: Elevations in neutrophil-associated cytokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and interleukin 6, and general inflammatory cytokines IFN-inducible protien-19, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin 1ß, interleukin 10, and tumor necrosis factor, were identified both at first measurement and across hospitalization (P < .0001). COVID-19 neutrophils had exaggerated oxidative burst (P < .0001), NETosis (P < .0001), and phagocytosis (P < .0001) relative to controls. Increased NETosis correlated with leukocytosis and neutrophilia, and neutrophils and NETs were identified within airways and alveoli in lung parenchyma of 40% of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected lungs available for examination (2 of 5). While elevations in IL-8 and absolute neutrophil count correlated with disease severity, plasma IL-8 levels alone correlated with death. CONCLUSIONS: Literature to date demonstrates compelling evidence of increased neutrophils in the circulation and lungs of COVID-19 patients. Importantly, neutrophil quantity and activation correlates with severity of disease. Similarly, our data show that circulating neutrophils in COVID-19 exhibit an activated phenotype with enhanced NETosis and oxidative burst.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracellular Traps , Critical Illness , Humans , Neutrophil Activation , Neutrophils , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Dev Cell ; 57(1): 112-145.e2, 2022 01 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587971

ABSTRACT

The human lung plays vital roles in respiration, host defense, and basic physiology. Recent technological advancements such as single-cell RNA sequencing and genetic lineage tracing have revealed novel cell types and enriched functional properties of existing cell types in lung. The time has come to take a new census. Initiated by members of the NHLBI-funded LungMAP Consortium and aided by experts in the lung biology community, we synthesized current data into a comprehensive and practical cellular census of the lung. Identities of cell types in the normal lung are captured in individual cell cards with delineation of function, markers, developmental lineages, heterogeneity, regenerative potential, disease links, and key experimental tools. This publication will serve as the starting point of a live, up-to-date guide for lung research at https://www.lungmap.net/cell-cards/. We hope that Lung CellCards will promote the community-wide effort to establish, maintain, and restore respiratory health.


Subject(s)
Lung/cytology , Lung/physiology , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Databases as Topic , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Regeneration/genetics , Single-Cell Analysis/methods
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572482

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic generated large amounts of stress across the globe. While acute stress negatively impacts health, defining exact consequences and behavioral interventions can be difficult. We hypothesized that a generalized increase in stress and anxiety caused by continuation of the global pandemic would negatively impact sleep quality and that ever users of e-cigarettes and conventional tobacco would have more profound alterations over time. Participants were recruited via social media to complete an online survey in April 2020 (n = 554). Inhalant use was assessed through the UCSD Inhalant Questionnaire and sleep quality was gauged through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). A set of participants (n = 217) retook the survey in June 2020. Inhalant users-historical or current e-cigarette vapers, conventional tobacco smokers, and dual users-had higher PSQI scores than never smoker/never vapers, demonstrating worse sleep quality in inhalant users. Non-smoking/non-vaping subjects who retook the survey in June 2020 had improvement in their PSQI scores by paired t test, indicating better sleep quality as the pandemic continued, while inhalant users of all types had persistently high PSQI scores (poor sleep quality). These data suggest that ever users of tobacco products may be susceptible to overall diminished sleep quality in the setting of stressful life circumstances. These data also suggest that pandemic-initiated lifestyle changes may have led to improvements in sleep quality. Finally, these findings raise concerns for correlations between either past or active e-cigarette use on sleep, and thus overall health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems , Vaping , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaping/adverse effects
7.
Elife ; 102021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380072

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, causes widespread damage in the lungs in the setting of an overzealous immune response whose origin remains unclear. Methods: We present a scalable, propagable, personalized, cost-effective adult stem cell-derived human lung organoid model that is complete with both proximal and distal airway epithelia. Monolayers derived from adult lung organoids (ALOs), primary airway cells, or hiPSC-derived alveolar type II (AT2) pneumocytes were infected with SARS-CoV-2 to create in vitro lung models of COVID-19. Results: Infected ALO monolayers best recapitulated the transcriptomic signatures in diverse cohorts of COVID-19 patient-derived respiratory samples. The airway (proximal) cells were critical for sustained viral infection, whereas distal alveolar differentiation (AT2→AT1) was critical for mounting the overzealous host immune response in fatal disease; ALO monolayers with well-mixed proximodistal airway components recapitulated both. Conclusions: Findings validate a human lung model of COVID-19, which can be immediately utilized to investigate COVID-19 pathogenesis and vet new therapies and vaccines. Funding: This work was supported by the National Institutes for Health (NIH) grants 1R01DK107585-01A1, 3R01DK107585-05S1 (to SD); R01-AI141630, CA100768 and CA160911 (to PG) and R01-AI 155696 (to PG, DS and SD); R00-CA151673 and R01-GM138385 (to DS), R01- HL32225 (to PT), UCOP-R00RG2642 (to SD and PG), UCOP-R01RG3780 (to P.G. and D.S) and a pilot award from the Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at UC San Diego Health (P.G, S.D, D.S). GDK was supported through The American Association of Immunologists Intersect Fellowship Program for Computational Scientists and Immunologists. L.C.A's salary was supported in part by the VA San Diego Healthcare System. This manuscript includes data generated at the UC San Diego Institute of Genomic Medicine (IGC) using an Illumina NovaSeq 6000 that was purchased with funding from a National Institutes of Health SIG grant (#S10 OD026929).


Subject(s)
Adult Stem Cells , COVID-19 , Lung/pathology , Models, Biological , Organoids , Adult Stem Cells/virology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/cytology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Organoids/virology , Pulmonary Alveoli/cytology , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology
8.
Sci Adv ; 7(34)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365115

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity is highly variable, with pediatric patients typically experiencing less severe infection than adults and especially the elderly. The basis for this difference is unclear. We find that mRNA and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the cell entry receptor for the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that causes COVID-19, increases with advancing age in distal lung epithelial cells. However, in humans, ACE2 expression exhibits high levels of intra- and interindividual heterogeneity. Further, cells infected with SARS-CoV-2 experience endoplasmic reticulum stress, triggering an unfolded protein response and caspase-mediated apoptosis, a natural host defense system that halts virion production. Apoptosis of infected cells can be selectively induced by treatment with apoptosis-modulating BH3 mimetic drugs. Notably, epithelial cells within young lungs and airways are more primed to undergo apoptosis than those in adults, which may naturally hinder virion production and support milder COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Apoptosis/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Age Factors , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Infant , Lung/cytology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization
9.
ATS Sch ; 2(2): 278-286, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365986

ABSTRACT

Background: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic resulted in redeployment of non-critical care-trained providers to intensive care units across the world. Concurrently, traditional venues for delivery of medical education faced major disruptions. The need for a virtual forum to fill knowledge gaps for healthcare workers caring for patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was apparent in the early stages of the pandemic. Objective: The weekly, open-access COVID-19 Critical Care Training Forum (CCCTF) organized by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) provided a global audience access to timely content relevant to their learning needs. The goals of the forum were threefold: to aid healthcare providers in assessment and treatment of patients with COVID-19, to reduce provider anxiety, and to disseminate best practices. Methods: The first 13 ATS CCCTF sessions streamed live from April to July 2020. Structured debriefs followed each session and participant feedback was evaluated in planning of subsequent sessions. A second set of 14 sessions streamed from August to November 2020. Content experts were recruited from academic institutions across the United States. Results: As of July 2020, the ATS CCCTF had 2,494 live participants and 7,687 downloads for a total of 10,181 views. The majority of participants had both completed training (58.6%) and trained in critical care (53.8%). Physicians made up a majority (82.2%) of the audience that spanned the globe (61% were international attendees). Conclusion: We describe the rapid and successful implementation of an open-access medical education forum to address training and knowledge gaps among healthcare personnel caring for patients with COVID-19.

10.
Front Physiol ; 12: 649604, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268279

ABSTRACT

Conventional smoking is known to both increase susceptibility to infection and drive inflammation within the lungs. Recently, smokers have been found to be at higher risk of developing severe forms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). E-cigarette aerosol inhalation (vaping) has been associated with several inflammatory lung disorders, including the recent e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) epidemic, and recent studies have suggested that vaping alters host susceptibility to pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). To assess the impact of vaping on lung inflammatory pathways, including the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor known to be involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection, mice were exposed to e-cigarette aerosols for 60 min daily for 1-6 months and underwent gene expression analysis. Hierarchical clustering revealed extensive gene expression changes occurred in the lungs of both inbred C57BL/6 mice and outbred CD1 mice, with 2,933 gene expression changes in C57BL/6 mice, and 2,818 gene expression changes in CD1 mice (>abs 1.25-fold change). Particularly, large reductions in IgA and CD4 were identified, indicating impairment of host responses to pathogens via reductions in immunoglobulins and CD4 T cells. CD177, facmr, tlr9, fcgr1, and ccr2 were also reduced, consistent with diminished host defenses via decreased neutrophils and/or monocytes in the lungs. Gene set enrichment (GSE) plots demonstrated upregulation of gene expression related to cell activation specifically in neutrophils. As neutrophils are a potential driver of acute lung injury in COVID-19, increased neutrophil activation in the lungs suggests that vapers are at higher risk of developing more severe forms of COVID-19. The receptor through which SARS-CoV-2 infects host cells, ACE2, was found to have moderate upregulation in mice exposed to unflavored vape pens, and further upregulation (six-fold) with JUUL mint aerosol exposure. No changes were found in mice exposed to unflavored Mod device-generated aerosols. These findings suggest that specific vaping devices and components of e-liquids have an effect on ACE2 expression, thus potentially increasing susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. In addition, exposure to e-cigarette aerosols both with and without nicotine led to alterations in eicosanoid lipid profiles within the BAL. These data demonstrate that chronic, daily inhalation of e-cigarette aerosols fundamentally alters the inflammatory and immune state of the lungs. Thus, e-cigarette vapers may be at higher risk of developing infections and inflammatory disorders of the lungs.

11.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(3): 479-489, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased inflammation has been well defined in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), while definitive pathways driving severe forms of this disease remain uncertain. Neutrophils are known to contribute to immunopathology in infections, inflammatory diseases, and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in COVID-19. Changes in neutrophil function in COVID-19 may give insight into disease pathogenesis and identify therapeutic targets. METHODS: Blood was obtained serially from critically ill COVID-19 patients for 11 days. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation (NETosis), oxidative burst, phagocytosis, and cytokine levels were assessed. Lung tissue was obtained immediately postmortem for immunostaining. PubMed searches for neutrophils, lung, and COVID-19 yielded 10 peer-reviewed research articles in English. RESULTS: Elevations in neutrophil-associated cytokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and interleukin 6, and general inflammatory cytokines IFN-inducible protien-19, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin 1ß, interleukin 10, and tumor necrosis factor, were identified both at first measurement and across hospitalization (P < .0001). COVID-19 neutrophils had exaggerated oxidative burst (P < .0001), NETosis (P < .0001), and phagocytosis (P < .0001) relative to controls. Increased NETosis correlated with leukocytosis and neutrophilia, and neutrophils and NETs were identified within airways and alveoli in lung parenchyma of 40% of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected lungs available for examination (2 of 5). While elevations in IL-8 and absolute neutrophil count correlated with disease severity, plasma IL-8 levels alone correlated with death. CONCLUSIONS: Literature to date demonstrates compelling evidence of increased neutrophils in the circulation and lungs of COVID-19 patients. Importantly, neutrophil quantity and activation correlates with severity of disease. Similarly, our data show that circulating neutrophils in COVID-19 exhibit an activated phenotype with enhanced NETosis and oxidative burst.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracellular Traps , Critical Illness , Humans , Neutrophil Activation , Neutrophils , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Am J Cardiol ; 131: 128-130, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609980

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the highly contagious SARS-CoV-2 virus has had devastating consequences across the globe. However, multiple clinics and hospitals have experienced a decrease in rates of acute myocardial infarction and corresponding cardiac catheterization lab activations, raising the question: Has the risk of myocardial infarction decreased during COVID? Sleep deprivation is known to be an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction, and sleep has been importantly impacted during the pandemic, possibly due to the changes in work-home life leading to a lack of structure. We conducted a social media-based survey to assess potential mechanisms underlying the observed improvement in risk of myocardial infarction. We used validated questionnaires to assess sleep patterns, tobacco consumption and other important health outcomes to test the hypothesis that increases in sleep duration may be occurring which have a beneficial impact on health. We found that the COVID-19 pandemic led to shifts in day/night rhythm, with subjects waking up 105 minutes later during the pandemic (p <0.0001). Subjects also reported going to sleep 41 minutes later during the pandemic (p <0.0001). These shifts led to longer duration of sleep during the COVID-19 pandemic. Before the pandemic, subjects reported sleeping 6.8 hours per night, which rose to 7.5 hours during the pandemic, a 44 minute or 11% increase (p <0.0001). We acknowledge the major negative health impact of the global pandemic but would advocate for using this crisis to improve the work and sleep habits of the general population, which may lead to overall health benefits for our society.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Sleep/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Incidence , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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