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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260889, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately 40-70% of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) fall each year, causing decreased activity levels and quality of life. Current fall-prevention strategies include the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. To increase the accessibility of this vulnerable population, we developed a multidisciplinary telemedicine program using an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platform. We hypothesized that the risk for falling in PD would decrease among participants receiving a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program added to standard office-based neurological care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention to decrease the incidence of falls in patients with PD. METHODS: Ongoing, longitudinal, randomized, single-blinded, case-control, clinical trial. We will include 76 non-demented patients with idiopathic PD with a high risk of falling and limited access to multidisciplinary care. The intervention group (n = 38) will receive multidisciplinary remote care in addition to standard medical care, and the control group (n = 38) standard medical care only. Nutrition, sarcopenia and frailty status, motor, non-motor symptoms, health-related quality of life, caregiver burden, falls, balance and gait disturbances, direct and non-medical costs will be assessed using validated rating scales. RESULTS: This study will provide a cost-effectiveness assessment of multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention for fall reduction in PD, in addition to standard neurological medical care. CONCLUSION: In this challenging initiative, we will determine whether a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program can reduce falls, as an alternative intervention option for PD patients with restricted access to multidisciplinary care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04694443.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Exercise Therapy/methods , Gait , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
2.
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry ; 92(Suppl 1):A30, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1394191

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe course of Huntington’s disease (HD) is believed to be modulated by lifestyle and genetic factors. However, we do not understand how the interplay of these affects disease progression. An efficient method of measuring lifestyle factors involves the use of digital monitoring devices, but their long-term use in clinical HD populations has not yet been explored.AimInvestigate the use of digital technologies in a longitudinal observational study to inform our understanding of the contribution of multi-domain lifestyle and genetic factors in the progression of HD.MethodsWe plan to recruit 300-450 people with early to mid-stage HD to a 12-month observational study measuring aspects of physical activity, nutrition and sleep. Participants with existing genome wide association study (GWAS) data will be preferentially recruited. Assessment of dietary, sleep and physical activity habits will be performed at baseline and 12-month follow-up Clinical measures will be obtained from the corresponding annual Enroll-HD assessment (within 8 weeks of the DOMINO-HD assessment). Each participant will wear a Fitbit for the duration of the study. Lifestyle, genetic and clinical data will be linked and propensity score weighting methodology will be applied to examine the causal effect of the multi-domain lifestyle and genetic measures on HD progression.ResultsThe start of recruitment was delayed by 10 months due to Covid-19. As of 1st July 2021, we have recruited 36 participants across 5 clinical sites, with recruitment planned to continue until March 2022.ConclusionSuccessful collection of longitudinal lifestyle data, combined with functional clinical measures and genetic factors will allow, for the first time, the investigation of causal relationships between environmental and genetic modifiers with HD progression. We can then use the information generated to design lifestyle interventions aimed at improving quality of life and prognosis in HD.

3.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(s1): S11-S18, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318376

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine programs are particularly suited to evaluating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders, primarily because much of the physical exam findings are visual. Telemedicine uses information and communication technologies to overcome geographical barriers and increase access to healthcare service. It is particularly beneficial for rural and underserved communities, groups that traditionally suffer from lack of access to healthcare. There is a growing evidence of the feasibility of telemedicine, cost and time savings, patients' and physicians' satisfaction, and its outcome and impact on patients' morbidity and quality of life. In addition, given the unusual current situation with the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has offered the opportunity to address the ongoing healthcare needs of patients with PD, to reduce in-person clinic visits, and human exposures (among healthcare workers and patients) to a range of infectious diseases including COVID-19. However, there are still several challenges to widespread implementation of telemedicine including the limited performance of parts of the neurological exam, limited technological savvy, fear of loss of a personal connection, or uneasiness about communicating sensitive information. On the other hand, while we are facing the new wave of COVID-19 pandemic, patients and clinicians are gaining increasing experience with telemedicine, facilitating equity of access to specialized multidisciplinary care for PD. This article summarizes and reviews the current state and future directions of telemedicine from a global perspective.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics
4.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(s1): S11-S18, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083887

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine programs are particularly suited to evaluating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders, primarily because much of the physical exam findings are visual. Telemedicine uses information and communication technologies to overcome geographical barriers and increase access to healthcare service. It is particularly beneficial for rural and underserved communities, groups that traditionally suffer from lack of access to healthcare. There is a growing evidence of the feasibility of telemedicine, cost and time savings, patients' and physicians' satisfaction, and its outcome and impact on patients' morbidity and quality of life. In addition, given the unusual current situation with the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has offered the opportunity to address the ongoing healthcare needs of patients with PD, to reduce in-person clinic visits, and human exposures (among healthcare workers and patients) to a range of infectious diseases including COVID-19. However, there are still several challenges to widespread implementation of telemedicine including the limited performance of parts of the neurological exam, limited technological savvy, fear of loss of a personal connection, or uneasiness about communicating sensitive information. On the other hand, while we are facing the new wave of COVID-19 pandemic, patients and clinicians are gaining increasing experience with telemedicine, facilitating equity of access to specialized multidisciplinary care for PD. This article summarizes and reviews the current state and future directions of telemedicine from a global perspective.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Mov Disord ; 35(10): 1701-1711, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726315

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic restricted usual healthcare management for movement-disorders patients, with a consequent upsurge in telemedicine to bridge the gap. OBJECTIVE: To assess global telemedicine usage in the context of the pandemic. METHODS: The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Telemedicine Study Group surveyed telemedicine experts from 40 countries across all continents in March-April 2020. Four domains of telemedicine were assessed: legal regulations, reimbursement, clinical use, and barriers; comparing emerging responses to the pandemic versus the baseline scenario. RESULTS: All forms of telemedicine for movement disorders increased globally, irrespective of country income categorization, as an immediate response to the pandemic. This was aided by widespread availability of technology and updated government regulations. However, privacy concerns, lack of reimbursement, limited access, and lack of telemedicine training were barriers highlighted worldwide. CONCLUSIONS: Questions remain about the longevity and extent of changes in regulations and reimbursement regarding telemedicine in the aftermath of the pandemic. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/economics , Movement Disorders/drug therapy , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Reimbursement Mechanisms , Telemedicine , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/economics
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