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2.
Lancet Respir Med ; 10(8): 749-760, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867947

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All currently available SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are administered by intramuscular injection. We aimed to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a live-attenuated influenza virus vector-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (dNS1-RBD) administered by intranasal spray in healthy adults. METHODS: We did double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 1 and 2 trials, followed by a phase 2 extension trial, at a single centre in Jiangsu, China. Healthy adults (≥18 years) who had negative serum or fingertip blood total antibody tests for SARS-CoV-2 (in phases 1 and 2), with no prevalent SARS-CoV-2 infection or history of infection and no SARS-CoV-2 vaccination history (in all three trials reported here), were enrolled. Participants were randomly allocated (4:1 in phase 1, 2:1 in phase 2, and 1:1 in the extension trial) to receive two intranasal doses of the dNS1-RBD vaccine or placebo on days 0 and 14 or, for half of the participants in phase 2, on days 0 and 21. To avoid cross-contamination during administration, vaccine and placebo recipients were vaccinated in separate rooms in the extension trial. The phase 1 primary outcome was safety (adverse events recorded on days 0-44; serious adverse events recorded from day 0 until 12 months after the second dose). In the phase 2 and extension trials, the primary immunogenicity outcomes were SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell response in peripheral blood (measured by IFN-γ ELISpot), proportion of participants with positive conversion for SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific IgG and secretory IgA (s-IgA) antibodies, and concentration of SARS-CoV-2 RBD IgG in serum and SARS-CoV-2 RBD s-IgA in the nasopharynx (measured by ELISA) at 1 month after the second dose in the per-protocol set for immunogenicity. χ2 test and Fisher's exact test were used to analyse categorical data, and t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare the measurement data between groups. These trials were registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR2000037782, ChiCTR2000039715, and ChiCTR2100048316). FINDINGS: Between Sept 1, 2020, and July 4, 2021, 63, 724, and 297 participants without a history of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination were enrolled in the phase 1, phase 2, and extension trials, respectively. At least one adverse reaction after vaccination was reported in 133 (19%) of 684 participants in the vaccine groups. Most adverse reactions were mild. No vaccine-related serious adverse event was noted. Specific T-cell immune responses were observed in 211 (46% [95% CI 42-51]) of 455 vaccine recipients in the phase 2 trial, and in 48 (40% [31-49]) of 120 vaccine recipients compared with one (1% [0-5]) of 111 placebo recipients (p<0·0001) in the extension trial. Seroconversion for RBD-specific IgG was observed in 48 (10% [95% CI 8-13]) of 466 vaccine recipients in the phase 2 trial (geometric mean titre [GMT] 3·8 [95% CI 3·4-4·3] in responders), and in 31 (22% [15-29]) of 143 vaccine recipients (GMT 4·4 [3·3-5·8]) and zero (0% [0-2]) of 147 placebo recipients (p<0·0001) in the extension trial. 57 (12% [95% CI 9-16]) of 466 vaccine recipients had positive conversion for RBD-specific s-IgA (GMT 3·8 [95% CI 3·5-4·1] in responders) in the phase 2 trial, as did 18 (13% [8-19]) of 143 vaccine recipients (GMT 5·2 [4·0-6·8]) and zero (0% [0-2]) of 147 placebo recipients (p<0·0001) in the extension trial. INTERPRETATION: dNS1-RBD was well tolerated in adults. Weak T-cell immunity in peripheral blood, as well as weak humoral and mucosal immune responses against SARS-CoV-2, were detected in vaccine recipients. Further studies are warranted to verify the safety and efficacy of intranasal vaccines as a potential supplement to current intramuscular SARS-CoV-2 vaccine pools. Steps should be taken in future studies to reduce the potential for cross-contamination caused by the vaccine strain aerosol during administration. FUNDING: National Key Research and Development Program of China, National Science, Fujian Provincial Science, CAMS Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences, and Beijing Wantai Biological Pharmacy Enterprise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Orthomyxoviridae , Viral Vaccines , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Attenuated/adverse effects
3.
Lancet Respir Med ; 10(8): 739-748, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852285

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to waning immunity and protection against infection with SARS-CoV-2, a third dose of a homologous or heterologous COVID-19 vaccine has been proposed by health agencies for individuals who were previously primed with two doses of an inactivated COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: We did a randomised, open-label, controlled trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of heterologous boost immunisation with an orally administered aerosolised adenovirus type-5 vector-based COVID-19 vaccine (Ad5-nCoV) in Chinese adults (≥18 years old) who had previously received two doses of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-Sinovac CoronaVac. Eligible participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a heterologous booster vaccination with a low dose (1·0 × 1011 viral particles per mL; 0·1 mL; low dose group), or a high dose (1·0 × 1011 viral particles per mL; 0·2 mL; high dose group) aerosolised Ad5-nCoV, or a homologous intramuscular vaccination with CoronaVac (0·5 mL). Only laboratory staff were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint for safety was the incidence of adverse reactions within 14 days after the booster dose. The primary endpoint for immunogenicity was the geometric mean titres (GMTs) of serum neutralising antibodies (NAbs) against live SARS-CoV-2 virus 14 days after the booster dose. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT05043259. FINDINGS: Between Sept 14 and 16, 2021, 420 participants were enrolled: 140 (33%) participants per group. Adverse reactions were reported by 26 (19%) participants in the low dose group and 33 (24%) in the high dose group within 14 days after the booster vaccination, significantly less than the 54 (39%) participants in the CoronaVac group (p<0·0001). The low dose group had a serum NAb GMT of 744·4 (95% CI 520·1-1065·6) and the high dose group had a GMT of 714·1 (479·4-1063·7) 14 days after booster dose, significantly higher than the GMT in the CoronaVac group (78·5 [60·5-101·7]; p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: We found that a heterologous booster vaccine with an orally administered aerosolised Ad5-nCoV is safe and highly immunogenic in adults who have previously received two doses of CoronaVac as the primary series vaccination. FUNDING: National Natural Science Foundation of China and Jiangsu Provincial Key Research and Development Program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
4.
Nat Med ; 28(2): 401-409, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655605

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants and the waning of vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies suggests that additional coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine doses may be needed for individuals who initially received CoronaVac. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the recombinant adenovirus type 5 (AD5)-vectored COVID-19 vaccine Convidecia as a heterologous booster versus those of CoronaVac as homologous booster in adults previously vaccinated with CoronaVac in an ongoing, randomized, observer-blinded, parallel-controlled phase 4 trial ( NCT04892459 ). Adults who had received two doses of CoronaVac in the past 3-6 months were vaccinated with Convidecia (n = 96) or CoronaVac (n = 102). Adults who had received one dose of CoronaVac in the past 1-3 months were also vaccinated with Convidecia (n = 51) or CoronaVac (n = 50). The co-primary endpoints were the occurrence of adverse reactions within 28 d after vaccination and geometric mean titers (GMTs) of neutralizing antibodies against live wild-type SARS-CoV-2 virus at 14 d after booster vaccination. Adverse reactions after vaccination were significantly more frequent in Convidecia recipients but were generally mild to moderate in all treatment groups. Heterologous boosting with Convidecia elicited significantly increased GMTs of neutralizing antibody against SARS-CoV-2 than homologous boosting with CoronaVac in participants who had previously received one or two doses of CoronaVac. These data suggest that heterologous boosting with Convidecia following initial vaccination with CoronaVac is safe and more immunogenic than homologous boosting.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adenoviridae/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Injection Site Reaction/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Young Adult
5.
Food Environ Virol ; 14(1): 101-104, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653805

ABSTRACT

To prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in cold-chain transportation in China, we developed specific cryogenic disinfectants. Carrier tests were performed against SARS-CoV-2 at - 20 °C for the four cryogenic disinfectants developed and qRT-PCR was used to test the virus RNA. Peracetic acid, chlorine disinfectants (two different concentrations), and quaternary ammonium disinfectant with their antifreeze can all inactivate SARS-CoV-2 in 5 min at - 20 °C. However, after 2-3 h of exposure, only chlorine disinfectant could destroy SARS-CoV-2 RNA. The viruses treated with peracetic acid and quaternary disinfectants showed positive Ct values even after 3 h detected with qRT-PCR. The conclusion was that the cold-chain disinfectants we tested could inactivate SARS-CoV-2 quickly and effectively, but only chlorine disinfectants could destroy nucleic acids in 3 h. Our study also illustrated that using qRT-PCR detection of viral nucleic acids to assess disinfection was inappropriate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfectants , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Disinfection , Humans , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Temperature
6.
Frontiers in public health ; 9, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1610555

ABSTRACT

Background: At present, the global sever acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) situation is still grim, and the risk of local outbreaks caused by imported viruses is high. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor the genomic variation and genetic evolution characteristics of SARS-CoV-2. The main purpose of this study was to detect the entry of different SARS-CoV-2 variants into Jiangsu Province, China. Methods: First, oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 165 patients (55 locally confirmed cases and 110 imported cases with confirmed and asymptomatic infection) diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Jiangsu Province, China between January 2020 and June 2021. Then, whole genome sequencing was used to explore the phylogeny and find potential mutations in genes of the SARS-CoV-2. Last, association analysis among clinical characteristics and SARS-CoV-2 Variant of Concern, pedigree surveillance analysis of SARS-COV-2, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detection in SARS-COV-2 samples was performed. Results: More men were infected with the SARS-CoV-2 when compared with women. The onset of the SARS-CoV-2 showed a trend of younger age. Moreover, the number of asymptomatic infected patients was large, similar to the number of common patients. Patients infected with Alpha (50%) and Beta (90%) variants were predominantly asymptomatic, while patients infected with Delta (17%) variant presented severe clinical features. A total of 935 SNPs were detected in 165 SARS-COV-2 samples. Among which, missense mutation (58%) was the dominant mutation type. About 56% of SNPs changes occurred in the open reading frame 1ab (ORF1ab) gene. Approximately, 20% of SNP changes occurred in spike glycoprotein (S) gene, such as p.Asp501Tyr, p.Pro681His, and p.Pro681Arg. In total, nine SNPs loci in S gene were significantly correlated with the severity of patients. It is worth mentioning that amino acid substitution of p.Asp614Gly was significantly positively correlated with the clinical severity of patients. The amino acid replacements of p.Ser316Thr and p.Lu484Lys were significantly negatively correlated with the course of disease. Conclusion: Sever acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may further undergo a variety of mutations in different hosts, countries, and weather conditions. Detecting the entry of different virus variants of SARS-CoV-2 into Jiangsu Province, China may help to monitor the spread of infection and the diversity of eventual recombination or genomic mutations.

7.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 165, 2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199266

ABSTRACT

The global spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) requires an urgent need to find effective therapeutics for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, we developed an integrative drug repositioning framework, which fully takes advantage of machine learning and statistical analysis approaches to systematically integrate and mine large-scale knowledge graph, literature and transcriptome data to discover the potential drug candidates against SARS-CoV-2. Our in silico screening followed by wet-lab validation indicated that a poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor, CVL218, currently in Phase I clinical trial, may be repurposed to treat COVID-19. Our in vitro assays revealed that CVL218 can exhibit effective inhibitory activity against SARS-CoV-2 replication without obvious cytopathic effect. In addition, we showed that CVL218 can interact with the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SARS-CoV-2 and is able to suppress the LPS-induced production of several inflammatory cytokines that are highly relevant to the prevention of immunopathology induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Computer Simulation , Drug Repositioning , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Humans
8.
J Virol ; 95(4)2021 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054610

ABSTRACT

Among seven coronaviruses that infect humans, three (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus [SARS-CoV], Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus [MERS-CoV], and the newly identified severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS-CoV-2]) are associated with a severe, life-threatening respiratory infection and multiorgan failure. We previously proposed that the cationically modified chitosan N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-3-trimethylammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC) is a potent inhibitor of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63). Next, we demonstrated the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of the compound, as it inhibited all low-pathogenicity human coronaviruses (HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-HKU1). Here, using in vitro and ex vivo models of human airway epithelia, we show that HTCC effectively blocks MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 infection. We also confirmed the mechanism of action for these two viruses, showing that the polymer blocks the virus entry into the host cell by interaction with the S protein.IMPORTANCE The beginning of 2020 brought us information about the novel coronavirus emerging in China. Rapid research resulted in the characterization of the pathogen, which appeared to be a member of the SARS-like cluster, commonly seen in bats. Despite the global and local efforts, the virus escaped the health care measures and rapidly spread in China and later globally, officially causing a pandemic and global crisis in March 2020. At present, different scenarios are being written to contain the virus, but the development of novel anticoronavirals for all highly pathogenic coronaviruses remains the major challenge. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of an HTCC compound, previously developed by us, which may be used as a potential inhibitor of currently circulating highly pathogenic coronaviruses-SARS-CoV-2 and MERS-CoV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chitosan/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Quaternary Ammonium Compounds/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Chitosan/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Pandemics , Respiratory Mucosa/drug effects , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
9.
J Infect Dis ; 222(5): 746-754, 2020 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990712

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We investigated the serum cytokine and chemokine levels in asymptomatic, mild, moderate, severe, and convalescent SARS-CoV-2-infected cases. Proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production induced by SARS-CoV-2 were observed not only in symptomatic patients but also in asymptomatic cases, and returned to normal after recovery. IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-18, G-CSF, M-CSF, MCP-1, MCP-3, IP-10, MIG, and MIP-1α were found to be associated with the severity of COVID-19. Moreover, a set of cytokine and chemokine profiles were significantly higher in SARS-CoV-2-infected male than female patients. The serum levels of MCP-1, G-CSF, and VEGF were weakly and positively correlated with viral titers. We suggest that combinatorial analysis of serum cytokines and chemokines with clinical classification may contribute to evaluation of the severity of COVID-19 and optimize the therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Chemokines/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Cytokines/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Chemokine CCL2/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/blood , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/blood , Viral Load
10.
Sci Total Environ ; 753: 141710, 2021 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713250

ABSTRACT

Respiratory and fecal aerosols play confirmed and suspected roles, respectively, in transmitting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). An extensive environmental sampling campaign of both toilet and non-toilet environments was performed in a dedicated hospital building for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and the associated environmental factors were analyzed. In total, 107 surface samples, 46 air samples, two exhaled condensate samples, and two expired air samples were collected within and beyond four three-bed isolation rooms. The data of the COVID-19 patients were collected. The building environmental design and the cleaning routines were reviewed. Field measurements of airflow and CO2 concentrations were conducted. The 107 surface samples comprised 37 from toilets, 34 from other surfaces in isolation rooms, and 36 from other surfaces outside the isolation rooms in the hospital. Four of these samples were positive, namely two ward door handles, one bathroom toilet seat cover, and one bathroom door handle. Three were weakly positive, namely one bathroom toilet seat, one bathroom washbasin tap lever, and one bathroom ceiling exhaust louver. Of the 46 air samples, one collected from a corridor was weakly positive. The two exhaled condensate samples and the two expired air samples were negative. The fecal-derived aerosols in patients' toilets contained most of the detected SARS-CoV-2 in the hospital, highlighting the importance of surface and hand hygiene for intervention.


Subject(s)
Bathroom Equipment , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Virology ; 549: 1-4, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684730

ABSTRACT

The current outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was reported in China firstly. A rapid, highly sensitive, specific, and simple operational method was needed for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. Here, we established a real-time reverse-transcription recombinase-aided amplification assay (RT-RAA) to detect SARS-CoV-2 rapidly. The primers and probe were designed based on the nucleocapsid protein gene (N gene) sequence of SARS-CoV-2. The detection limit was 10 copies per reaction in this assay, which could be conducted within 15 min at a constant temperature (39 °C), without any cross-reactions with other respiratory tract pathogens, such as other coronaviruses. Furthermore, compared with commercial real-time RT-PCR assay, it showed a kappa value of 0.959 (p < 0.001) from 150 clinical specimens. These results indicated that this real-time RT-RAA assay may be a valuable tool for detecting SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genes, Viral , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins , Humans , Limit of Detection , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/statistics & numerical data , Recombinases , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
12.
Virus Res ; 285: 198005, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-261608

ABSTRACT

Accumulating evidence shows that microbial co-infection increases the risk of disease severity in humans. There have been few studies about SARS-CoV-2 co-infection with other pathogens. In this retrospective study, 257 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients in Jiangsu Province were enrolled from January 22 to February 2, 2020. They were re-confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and tested for 39 respiratory pathogens. In total, 24 respiratory pathogens were found among the patients, and 242 (94.2 %) patients were co-infected with one or more pathogens. Bacterial co-infections were dominant in all COVID-19 patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The highest and lowest rates of co-infections were found in patients aged 15-44 and below 15, respectively. Most co-infections occurred within 1-4 days of onset of COVID-19 disease. In addition, the proportion of viral co-infections, fungal co-infections and bacterial-fungal co-infections were the highest severe COVID-19 cases. These results will provide a helpful reference for diagnosis and clinical treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , Betacoronavirus , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Virus Diseases/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Young Adult
13.
Virology ; 546: 122-126, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-186247

ABSTRACT

Since SARS-CoV-2 spreads rapidly around the world, data have been needed on the natural fluctuation of viral load and clinical indicators associated with it. We measured and compared viral loads of SARS-CoV-2 from pharyngeal swab, IgM anti-SARS-CoV-2, CRP and SAA from serum of 114 COVID-19 patients on admission. Positive rates of IgM anti-SARS-CoV-2, CRP and SAA were 80.7%, 36% and 75.4% respectively. Among IgM-positive patients, viral loads showed different trends among cases with different severity, While viral loads of IgM-negative patients tended to increase along with the time after onset. As the worsening of severity, the positive rates of CRP and SAA also showed trends of increase. Different CRP/SAA type showed associations with viral loads in patients in different severity and different time after onset. Combination of the IgM and CRP/SAA with time after onset and severity may give suggestions on the viral load and condition judgment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Viral Load , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Amyloid A Protein/analysis , Young Adult
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