Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 16 de 16
Filter
1.
Neurol Clin Pract ; 12(3): 223-233, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957083

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically increased telehealth use. We assessed access to and use of telehealth care, including videoconferencing and usability of videoconferencing, among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In Fall 2020, we surveyed participants in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis Registry. Participants reported availability and receipt of MS care or education through telehealth. Participants who completed ≥1 live videoconferencing visit completed the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ). We tested factors associated with access to and receipt of telehealth care using logistic regression. We tested factors associated with TUQ scores using quantile regression. Results: Of the 8,434 participants to whom the survey was distributed, 6,043 responded (71.6%); 5,403 were eligible for analysis. Of the respondents, 4,337 (80.6%) were women, and they had a mean (SD) age of 63.2 (10.0) years. Overall, 2,889 (53.5%) reported access to MS care via telehealth, and 2,110 (39.1%) reported receipt of MS care via telehealth including 1,523 (28%) via videoconference. Among participants who reported telehealth was available, older age was associated with decreased odds of having a telehealth video visit; higher income and being physically active were associated with increased odds. Older age and moderate to very severe visual symptoms were associated with lower perceived usability of telehealth. Discussion: Older age, lower socioeconomic status, and disease-related impairments are associated with less access to and use of telehealth services in people with MS. Barriers to telehealth should be addressed to avoid aggravating health care disparities when using digital medicine.

2.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 65: 104028, 2022 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914837

ABSTRACT

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often of childbearing age. Thirty-six women with MS who were pregnant (n = 27) or within 6 weeks postpartum (n = 9) were reported in the North American COViMS registry and their COVID-19 outcomes were described. One pregnant and one postpartum woman were hospitalized. No deaths occurred. To compare COVID-19 clinical outcomes in pregnant and postpartum females with females who were not pregnant or postpartum, a 1:2 propensity score match was performed. While not powered to detect small differences, it was reassuring that no increased risks for those with MS who were pregnant/postpartum were revealed.

3.
Am J Med Sci ; 2022 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914120

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about satisfaction with different modes of telemedicine delivery. The objective of this study was to determine whether patient satisfaction with phone-only was noninferior to video visits. METHODS: We conducted a parallel group, randomized (1:1), single-blind, noninferiority trial in multispecialty clinics at a tertiary academic medical center. Adults age ≥ 60 years or with Medicare/Medicaid insurance were eligible. Primary outcome was visit satisfaction rate (9 or 10 on a 0-10 satisfaction scale). Noninferiority was determined if satisfaction with phone-only (intervention) versus video visits (comparator) was no worse by a -15% prespecified noninferiority margin. We performed modified intent-to-treat (mITT) and per protocol analyses, after adjusting for age and insurance. RESULTS: 200 participants, 43% Black, 68% women completed surveys. Visit satisfaction rates were high. In the mITT analysis, phone-only visits were noninferior by an adjusted difference of 3.2% (95% CI, -7.6% to 14%). In the per protocol analysis, phone-only were noninferior by an adjusted difference of -4.1% (95% CI, -14.8% to 6.6%). The proportion of participants who indicated they preferred the same type of telemedicine visit as their next clinic visit were similar (30.2% vs 27.9% video vs phone-only, p = 0.78) and a majority said their medical concerns were addressed and would recommend a telemedicine visit. CONCLUSIONS: Among a group of diverse, established older or underserved patients the satisfaction rate for phone-only was noninferior to video visits. These findings could impact practice and policies governing telemedicine.

4.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 323(1): L84-L92, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891936

ABSTRACT

Increased plasma mitochondrial DNA concentrations are associated with poor outcomes in multiple critical illnesses, including COVID-19. However, current methods of cell-free mitochondrial DNA quantification in plasma are time-consuming and lack reproducibility. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to characterize the size and genome location of circulating mitochondrial DNA in critically ill subjects with COVID-19 to develop a facile and optimal method of quantification by droplet digital PCR. Sequencing revealed a large percentage of small mitochondrial DNA fragments in plasma with wide variability in coverage by genome location. We identified probes for the mitochondrial DNA genes, cytochrome B and NADH dehydrogenase 1, in regions of relatively high coverage that target small sequences potentially missed by other methods. Serial assessments of absolute mitochondrial DNA concentrations were then determined in plasma from 20 critically ill subjects with COVID-19 without a DNA isolation step. Mitochondrial DNA concentrations on the day of enrollment were increased significantly in patients with moderate or severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) compared with those with no or mild ARDS. Comparisons of mitochondrial DNA concentrations over time between patients with no/mild ARDS who survived, patients with moderate/severe ARDS who survived, and nonsurvivors showed the highest concentrations in patients with more severe disease. Absolute mitochondrial DNA quantification by droplet digital PCR is time-efficient and reproducible; thus, we provide a valuable tool and rationale for future studies evaluating mitochondrial DNA as a real-time biomarker to guide clinical decision-making in critically ill subjects with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , Critical Illness , DNA, Mitochondrial/genetics , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reproducibility of Results , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics
5.
Mult Scler J Exp Transl Clin ; 8(2): 20552173221102067, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869015

ABSTRACT

Objective: We estimated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination rates in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) population and investigated reasons for vaccine hesitancy. Methods: In Spring 2021, we surveyed the NARCOMS participants about COVID-19 vaccinations. Participants reported whether they had received any COVID-19 vaccination; if not, they reported why not. They also reported whether they had received influenza vaccination. Using multivariable logistic regression, we assessed participant characteristics associated with uptake of COVID-19 and influenza vaccines. Results: Of 4955 eligible respondents, 3998 (80.7%) were females with a mean (SD) age of 64.0 (9.7) years. Overall, 4165 (84.1%) reported that they had received a COVID-19 vaccine, most often Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, and 3723 (75.4%) received a seasonal influenza vaccine. Reasons for not getting the COVID-19 vaccine included possible adverse effects (47.73%), possible lack of efficacy (13.7%), and lack of perceived need (17.1%). Factors associated with receiving the COVID-19 vaccine included receipt of influenza vaccine, older age, higher socioeconomic status, any leisure physical activity, and use of disease-modifying therapy. Conclusion: In this older cohort of people with multiple sclerosis, COVID-19 vaccine uptake was high, exceeding uptake of seasonal influenza vaccine. Concerns regarding safety, efficacy, and lack of perceived risk were associated with not obtaining the COVID-19 vaccine.

7.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 60: 103735, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and severity with disease modifying therapies (DMTs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear, with some studies demonstrating increased risks of infection with B-cell-depleting (anti-CD20) therapies and severity, while others fail to observe an association. Most existing studies are limited by a reliance on 'numerator' data (i.e., COVID-19 cases) only. OBJECTIVE: To assess the risks of COVID-19 by DMT, this study aimed to assess both 'numerator' (patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection) and 'denominator' data (all patients treated with DMTs of interest) to determine if any DMTs impart an increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection or disease severity. METHODS: We systematically reviewed charts and queried patients during clinic encounters in the NYU MS Comprehensive Care Center (MSCCC) for evidence of COVID-19 in all patients who were on the most commonly used DMTs in our clinic (sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1P) modulators (fingolimod/siponimod), rituximab, ocrelizumab, fumarates (dimethyl fumarate/diroximel fumarate), and natalizumab). COVID-19 status was determined by clinical symptoms (CDC case definition) and laboratory testing where available (SARS-CoV-2 PCR, SARS-CoV-2 IgG). Multivariable analyses were conducted to determine predictors of infection and severe disease (hospitalization or death) using SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals per DMT group and all individuals on a given DMT as denominator. RESULTS: We identified 1,439 MS patients on DMTs of interest, of which 230 had lab-confirmed (n = 173; 75.2%) or suspected (n = 57; 24.8%) COVID-19. Infection was most frequent in those on rituximab (35/138; 25.4%), followed by fumarates (39/217; 18.0%), S1P modulators (43/250; 17.2%), natalizumab (36/245; 14.7%), and ocrelizumab (77/589; 13.1%). There were 14 hospitalizations and 2 deaths. No DMT was found to be significantly associated with increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Rituximab was a predictor of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection (OR 6.7; 95% CI 1.1-41.7) but did not reach statistical significance when the entire patient population on DMT was used (OR 2.8; 95% CI 0.6-12.2). No other DMT was associated with an increased risk of severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of COVID-19 risk among all patients on the commonly used DMTs did not demonstrate increased risk of infection with any DMT. Rituximab was associated with increased risk for severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Dimethyl Fumarate/therapeutic use , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Natalizumab/therapeutic use , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMC Nephrol ; 23(1): 63, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690946

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV2 develop acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently, yet gaps remain in understanding why adults seem to have higher rates compared to children. Our objectives were to evaluate the epidemiology of SARS-CoV2-related AKI across the age spectrum and determine if known risk factors such as illness severity contribute to its pattern. METHODS: Secondary analysis of ongoing prospective international cohort registry. AKI was defined by KDIGO-creatinine only criteria. Log-linear, logistic and generalized estimating equations assessed odds ratios (OR), risk differences (RD), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AKI and mortality adjusting for sex, pre-existing comorbidities, race/ethnicity, illness severity, and clustering within centers. Sensitivity analyses assessed different baseline creatinine estimators. RESULTS: Overall, among 6874 hospitalized patients, 39.6% (n = 2719) developed AKI. There was a bimodal distribution of AKI by age with peaks in older age (≥60 years) and middle childhood (5-15 years), which persisted despite controlling for illness severity, pre-existing comorbidities, or different baseline creatinine estimators. For example, the adjusted OR of developing AKI among hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV2 was 2.74 (95% CI 1.66-4.56) for 10-15-year-olds compared to 30-35-year-olds and similarly was 2.31 (95% CI 1.71-3.12) for 70-75-year-olds, while adjusted OR dropped to 1.39 (95% CI 0.97-2.00) for 40-45-year-olds compared to 30-35-year-olds. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV2-related AKI is common with a bimodal age distribution that is not fully explained by known risk factors or confounders. As the pandemic turns to disproportionately impacting younger individuals, this deserves further investigation as the presence of AKI and SARS-CoV2 infection increases hospital mortality risk.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Confidence Intervals , Creatinine/blood , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Severity of Illness Index
9.
J Neurol ; 269(4): 1758-1763, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503921

ABSTRACT

Pandemic restrictions have led to changes in therapy plans and disrupted rehabilitation services for people with multiple sclerosis. CogEx is an international, multicentre MS dual-intervention (cognitive rehabilitation, aerobic exercise) randomized, controlled rehabilitation trial confined to people with progressive disease. The primary outcome is cognition (processing speed).There are 11 treatment sites in six countries with participants required to make 27 site visits over 12 weeks. Collectively, the large, in-person demands of the trial, and the varying international policies for the containment of COVID-19, might disproportionately impact the administration of CogEx. During the first lockdown, all centres closed on average for 82.9 (SD = 24.3) days. One site was required to lockdown on two further occasions. One site remained closed for 16 months. Ten staff (19.2%) were required to quarantine and eight staff (15.4%) tested positive for COVID. 10 of 264 (3.8%) participants acquired COVID-19. All survived. The mean duration of enrollment delay has been [236.7 (SD = 214.5) days]. Restarting participants whose interventions were interrupted by the pandemic meant recalculating the intervention prescriptions for these individuals. While the impact of the pandemic on CogEx has been considerable, all study sites are again open. Participants and staff have shown considerable flexibility and resilience in keeping a complex, international endeavour running. The future in general remains uncertain in the midst of a pandemic, but there is cautious optimism the study will be completed with sufficient sample size to robustly evaluate our hypothesis and provide meaningful results to the MS community on the impact of these interventions on people with progressive MS.Trial registration: The trial was registered on September 20th 2018 at www.clinicaltrials.gov having identifier NCT03679468. Registration was performed before recruitment was initiated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pandemics
10.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(5)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on people with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease (MOGAD). METHODS: The COVID-19 Infections in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Related Diseases (COViMS) Registry collected data on North American patients with MS and related diseases with laboratory-positive or highly suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. Deidentified data were entered into a web-based registry by health care providers. Data were analyzed using t-tests, Pearson χ2 tests, or Fisher exact tests for categorical variables. Univariate logistic regression models examined effects of risk factors and COVID-19 clinical severity. RESULTS: As of June 7, 2021, 77 patients with NMOSD and 20 patients with MOGAD were reported in the COViMS Registry. Most patients with NMOSD were laboratory positive for SARS-CoV-2 and taking rituximab at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis. Most patients with NMOSD were not hospitalized (64.9% [95% CI: 53.2%-75.5%]), whereas 15.6% (95% CI: 8.3%-25.6%) were hospitalized only, 9.1% (95% CI: 3.7%-17.8%) were admitted to the ICU and/or ventilated, and 10.4% (95% CI: 4.6%-19.5%) died. In patients with NMOSD, having a comorbidity was the sole factor identified for poorer COVID-19 outcome (OR = 6.0, 95% CI: 1.79-19.98). Most patients with MOGAD were laboratory positive for SARS-CoV-2, and almost half were taking rituximab. Among patients with MOGAD, 75.0% were not hospitalized, and no deaths were recorded; no factors were different between those not hospitalized and those hospitalized, admitted to the ICU, or ventilated. DISCUSSION: Among the reported patients with NMOSD, a high mortality rate was observed, and the presence of comorbid conditions was associated with worse COVID-19 outcome. There were no deaths reported in the patients with MOGAD, although these observations are limited due to small sample size.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein/immunology , Neuromyelitis Optica/mortality , Registries , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neuromyelitis Optica/drug therapy , North America/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Respiration, Artificial , Rituximab/administration & dosage
11.
Muscle Nerve ; 64(3): 270-276, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219308

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION/AIMS: Telemedicine may be particularly well-suited for myasthenia gravis (MG) due to the disorder's need for specialized care, its hallmark fluctuating muscle weakness, and the potential for increased risk of virus exposure among patients with MG during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic during in-person clinical visits. A disease-specific telemedicine physical examination to reflect myasthenic weakness does not currently exist. METHODS: This paper outlines step-by-step guidance on the fundamentals of a telemedicine assessment for MG. The Myasthenia Gravis Core Exam (MG-CE) is introduced as a MG-specific, telemedicine, physical examination, which contains eight components (ptosis, diplopia, facial strength, bulbar strength, dysarthria, single breath count, arm strength, and sit to stand) and takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. RESULTS: Pre-visit preparation, remote ascertainment of patient-reported outcome scales and visit documentation are also addressed. DISCUSSION: Additional knowledge gaps in telemedicine specific to MG care are identified for future investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Myasthenia Gravis/diagnosis , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Physical Examination/methods , Physicians , Telemedicine/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Myasthenia Gravis/therapy , Patient Education as Topic/standards , Physical Examination/standards , Physicians/standards , Telemedicine/standards
12.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(6): 699-708, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141278

ABSTRACT

Importance: Emergence of SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 prompted the need to gather information on clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with morbidity and mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and concomitant SARS-CoV-2 infections. Objective: To examine outcomes and risk factors associated with COVID-19 clinical severity in a large, diverse cohort of North American patients with MS. Design, Setting, and Participants: This analysis used deidentified, cross-sectional data on patients with MS and SARS-CoV-2 infection reported by health care professionals in North American academic and community practices between April 1, 2020, and December 12, 2020, in the COVID-19 Infections in MS Registry. Health care professionals were asked to report patients after a minimum of 7 days from initial symptom onset and after sufficient time had passed to observe the COVID-19 disease course through resolution of acute illness or death. Data collection began April 1, 2020, and is ongoing. Exposures: Laboratory-positive SARS-CoV-2 infection or highly suspected COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinical outcome with 4 levels of increasing severity: not hospitalized, hospitalization only, admission to the intensive care unit and/or required ventilator support, and death. Results: Of 1626 patients, most had laboratory-positive SARS-CoV-2 infection (1345 [82.7%]), were female (1202 [74.0%]), and had relapsing-remitting MS (1255 [80.4%]). A total of 996 patients (61.5%) were non-Hispanic White, 337 (20.8%) were Black, and 190 (11.7%) were Hispanic/Latinx. The mean (SD) age was 47.7 (13.2) years, and 797 (49.5%) had 1 or more comorbidity. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% (95% CI, 2.5%-4.3%). Ambulatory disability and older age were each independently associated with increased odds of all clinical severity levels compared with those not hospitalized after adjusting for other risk factors (nonambulatory: hospitalization only, odds ratio [OR], 2.8 [95% CI, 1.6-4.8]; intensive care unit/required ventilator support, OR, 3.5 [95% CI, 1.6-7.8]; death, OR, 25.4 [95% CI, 9.3-69.1]; age [every 10 years]: hospitalization only, OR, 1.3 [95% CI, 1.1-1.6]; intensive care unit/required ventilator support, OR, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.99-1.7]; death, OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.2-2.6]). Conclusions and Relevance: In this registry-based cross-sectional study, increased disability was independently associated with worse clinical severity including death from COVID-19. Other risk factors for worse outcomes included older age, Black race, cardiovascular comorbidities, and recent treatment with corticosteroids. Knowledge of these risk factors may improve the treatment of patients with MS and COVID-19 by helping clinicians identify patients requiring more intense monitoring or COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/mortality , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Registries , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
13.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 50: 102856, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has raised concerns for increased risk of infection in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and disrupted their routine MS care. The aim of this study is to characterize the extent of MS patients' perceptions of risk and adherence to care during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was emailed to patients from a large MS center in New York City during the local peak of the pandemic to assess perceptions of infection risk and adherence to MS care including appointments, laboratory studies, MRIs, and taking disease-modifying therapies (DMT). RESULTS: 529 patients from the MS center responded to the survey during two weeks in April 2020. Patients collectively showed concern about becoming infected with COVID-19 (88%) and perceived a higher infection risk due of having MS (70%) and taking DMTs (68%). Patients frequently postponed appointments (41%), laboratory studies (46%), and MRIs (41%). Noncompliance with DMTs was less common (13%). Decisions to alter usual recommendations for care were made by the patient more often than by the provider regarding adherence to appointments (68%), laboratory studies (70%), MRI (67%), and DMT (65%). Degree of concern for infection was associated with adherence to appointments (p=0.020) and laboratory studies (p=0.016) but not with adherence to MRI and DMTs. Thirty-five patients reported being tested for COVID-19, of whom fourteen reported a positive test. CONCLUSION: Patients with MS were highly concerned about becoming infected during the local peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Behaviors that deviated from originally recommended MS care were common and often self-initiated, but patients were overall compliant with continuing DMTs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Neurol ; 268(5): 1598-1607, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722251

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Individuals with pre-existing chronic illness have shown increased anxiety and depression due to COVID-19. Here, we examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emotional symptomatology and quality of life in individuals with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PMS). METHODS: Data were obtained during a randomized clinical trial on rehabilitation taking place at 11 centers in North America and Europe. Participants included 131 individuals with PMS. Study procedures were interrupted in accordance with governmental restrictions as COVID-19 spread. During study closure, a COVID Impact Survey was administered via telephone or email to all participants, along with measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, quality of life, and MS symptomatology that were previously administered pre-pandemic. RESULTS: 4% of respondents reported COVID-19 infection. No significant changes were noted in anxiety, quality of life, or the impact of MS symptomatology on daily life from baseline to lockdown. While total HADS-depression scores increased significantly at follow-up, this did not translate into more participants scoring above the HADS threshold for clinically significant depression. No significant relationships were noted between disease duration, processing speed ability or EDSS, and changes in symptoms of depression or anxiety. Most participants reported the impact of the virus on their psychological well-being, with a little impact on financial well-being. The perceived impact of the pandemic on physical and psychological well-being was correlated with the impact of MS symptomatology on daily life, as well as changes in depression. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, little change was noted in symptoms of depression or anxiety or overall quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , North America/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL