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1.
Int J Cardiol Congenit Heart Dis ; 6: 100266, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773368

ABSTRACT

Background: real-world data on COVID-19 vaccine safety, immunogenicity and acceptance in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are lacking. Methods: ACHD patients who were offered COVID-19 vaccination from January to June 2021 were included. Data on adverse events, on patients' attitude towards vaccination and antispike IgG titre were retrospectively collected. A group of healthy individuals with similar age and sex undergoing vaccination was included for comparison. Results: 208 patients followed in a single ACHD tertiary centre (33.3 [26-45] years, 54% male) received COVID-19 vaccine, 65% vaccinated at our institution: 199 (96%) received Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 vaccine, 4 (2%) Moderna-1273 and 5 (2%) AstraZeneca-ChAdOx1. Median follow-up after vaccination was 79 [57-96] days. No major adverse event was reported and the incidence of minor events was not different between ACHD patients and the control group. One patient was diagnosed with acute pericarditis. There were two deaths unrelated to the vaccine during follow-up. Three (1.5%) vaccinated patients tested positive for COVID-19. Antispike IgG titre, available in 159 (76%) patients, was 1334 [600-3401] BAU/ml, not significantly different from the control group (p=0.2). One patient with Fontan failure was seronegative. Advanced physiological stage was associated with lower antibody response, independently from previous viral exposure (p<0.0001). Fourteen percent refused COVID-19 vaccination at our institution. However, 50% of vaccinated patients declared to have been influenced by the discussion with the ACHD cardiologist and 66% of those vaccinated in situ reported that undergoing COVID-19 vaccination at the ACHD centre made them feel safer. Conclusion: COVID-19 vaccines appear safe in ACHD with satisfactory immunogenicity. However, the most vulnerable patients showed lower antibody response. ACHD team may play a key role in vaccine acceptance.

2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390657

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a global threat that has spread since the end of 2019, causing severe clinical sequelae and deaths, in the context of a world pandemic. The infection of the highly pathogenetic and infectious SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been proven to exert systemic effects impacting the metabolism. Yet, the metabolic pathways involved in the pathophysiology and progression of COVID-19 are still unclear. Here, we present the results of a mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomic analysis on a cohort of 52 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, classified according to disease severity as mild, moderate, and severe. Our analysis defines a clear signature of COVID-19 that includes increased serum levels of lactic acid in all the forms of the disease. Pathway analysis revealed dysregulation of energy production and amino acid metabolism. Globally, the variations found in the serum metabolome of COVID-19 patients may reflect a more complex systemic perturbation induced by SARS-CoV-2, possibly affecting carbon and nitrogen liver metabolism.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Carbon/metabolism , Liver/metabolism , Metabolome , Nitrogen/metabolism , Amino Acids/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Discriminant Analysis , Humans , Least-Squares Analysis , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolomics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 2941, 2021 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062774

ABSTRACT

In recent months, Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread throughout the world. COVID-19 patients show mild, moderate or severe symptoms with the latter ones requiring access to specialized intensive care. SARS-CoV-2 infections, pathogenesis and progression have not been clearly elucidated yet, thus forcing the development of many complementary approaches to identify candidate cellular pathways involved in disease progression. Host lipids play a critical role in the virus life, being the double-membrane vesicles a key factor in coronavirus replication. Moreover, lipid biogenesis pathways affect receptor-mediated virus entry at the endosomal cell surface and modulate virus propagation. In this study, targeted lipidomic analysis coupled with proinflammatory cytokines and alarmins measurement were carried out in serum of COVID-19 patients characterized by different severity degree. Serum IL-26, a cytokine involved in IL-17 pathway, TSLP and adiponectin were measured and correlated to lipid COVID-19 patient profiles. These results could be important for the classification of the COVID-19 disease and the identification of therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Alarmins/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Discriminant Analysis , Female , Humans , Least-Squares Analysis , Lipids/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
4.
J Immunother Cancer ; 8(2)2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713881

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The inflammatory pathology observed in severe COVID-19 disease caused by the 2019 novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is characterized by elevated serum levels of C reactive protein (CRP) and cytokines, including interferon gamma, interleukin 8 (IL-8), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Initial reports from the outbreak in Italy, China and the USA have provided anecdotal evidence of improved outcomes with the administration of anti-IL-6 agents, and large-scale trials evaluating these therapies are ongoing. STUDY DESCRIPTION: In this retrospective case series, clinical outcomes and correlates of response to treatment with the IL-6 receptor antagonist sarilumab are described for 15 patients with COVID-19 from a single institution in Southern Italy. Among 10 patients whose symptoms improved after sarilumab treatment, rapid decreases in CRP levels corresponded with clinical improvement. Lower levels of IL-6 at baseline as well as lower neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio as compared with patients whose COVID-19 did not improve with treatment were associated with sarilumab-responsive disease. CONCLUSIONS: This observation may reflect a possible clinical benefit regarding early intervention with IL-6-modulatory therapies for COVID-19 and that CRP could be a potential biomarker of response to treatment.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Biomarkers, Pharmacological/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Interleukin-6/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Italy , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
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