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1.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e445-e465, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To replace educational opportunities lost during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Department of Neurosurgery at Lenox Hill Hospital produced an open-access webinar series ("BRAINterns") that covered a broad range of health care topics with a focus on neurosurgery. METHODS: This 8-week webinar series ran from July 1 to August 28, 2020. An optional exit survey was distributed to participants. Data were analyzed to characterize and better understand trends among a global cohort of participants. RESULTS: A total of 16,484 people registered for BRAINterns, and 6675 took the survey (40.5% response rate). Responders represented 87 countries, of which the majority were from the United States and Canada (90.48%, n = 6039). Responders were primarily female (82.9%, n = 5521). Racial and ethnic representation was majority Asian (42%, n = 2798), followed by White (22.7%, n = 1514), Hispanic/Latino (16.2%, n = 1080), and Black and African American (7.7%, n = 516). Participants reported hearing about BRAINterns through various social media platforms (72.18%, n = 4818)-the most popular was TikTok (33.4%, n = 2232). Overall, 93.4% of participants reported that the course was a good use of their time during the pandemic, and 86.7% reported that the course helped replace lost opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that webinar-based education is an effective method of expanding access to careers in medicine and in particular, neurosurgery, to traditionally underrepresented populations. Social media can be a powerful tool to combat barriers to early exposure and vastly improve diversity within the field.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Social Media , Videoconferencing/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Child , Cultural Diversity , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
World Neurosurg ; 142: 314-317, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has infected more than 13 million people on a global scale and claimed more than half million deaths across 213 countries and territories. While the focus is currently on recovery from the pandemic, the disease has significantly changed the way we practice medicine and neurosurgery in New York City and the United States. Apart from the emergency cases, several health systems across the country have similarly started to perform elective surgeries. Although COVID-19 screening and testing guidelines have been proposed and adopted by many hospitals, these may not adequately protect the operating room personnel who are in proximity to the patient for prolonged periods. There are concerning reports of especially high transmission rates of COVID-19 in transmucosal head and neck procedures conducted by otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons, despite attempts at wearing what constitutes appropriate personal protective equipment. METHODS: Here, we describe a simple technique of additional draping that can be used for all cranial, endonasal, spinal, and neurointerventional cases to limit the transmission of coronavirus. RESULTS: The proposed technique offers a simple, commonly available, cost-effective alternative that avoids the use of additional retractor systems. Moreover, this technique can be used in all neurosurgical procedures. CONCLUSIONS: With the rising concerns regarding airborne spread of the virus, we expect that these precautions will prove highly useful as we enter the recovery phase of this pandemic and hospitals attempt to prevent a return to widespread infection. In addition, its availability and cost effectiveness make this technique especially attractive to practical use in centers with limited resources.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurosurgical Procedures/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Surgical Drapes , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Nasal Cavity , Natural Orifice Endoscopic Surgery , Neuroendoscopy/instrumentation , Neuroendoscopy/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
5.
World Neurosurg ; 139: e859-e863, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-367037

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVD-19) pandemic has drastically disrupted the delivery of neurosurgical care, especially for the already at-risk neuro-oncology population. The sudden change to clinic visits has rapidly spurned the implementation of telemedicine. A recommendation care paradigm of neuro-oncologic patients limited by telemedicine has not been reported. METHODS: A summary of a multi-institution experience detailing the potential benefits, pitfalls, and the necessary considerations to outpatient care of neurosurgical oncology patients. RESULTS: There are limitations and advantages to incorporating telemedicine into the outpatient care of neuro-oncology patients. Telemedicine-specific considerations for each step and stakeholder of the appointment (physician, patient, scheduling, previsit, imaging, and physical examination) are examined. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine, pushed to prominence during this COVID-19 pandemic, is a powerful and possibly preferential tool for the future of outpatient neuro-oncologic care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/trends , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Medical Oncology/trends , Neurosurgery/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Telemedicine/trends , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Forecasting , Humans , Medical Oncology/standards , Neurosurgery/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards
6.
World Neurosurg ; 139: 289-293, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-232517

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has left a lasting mark on medicine globally. METHODS: Here we outline the steps that the Lenox Hill Hospital/Northwell Health Neurosurgery Department-located within the epicenter of the pandemic in New York City-is currently taking to recover our neurosurgical efforts in the age of COVID-19. RESULTS: We outline measurable milestones to identify the transition to the recovery period and hope these recommendations may serve as a framework for an effective path forward. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic offers unique opportunities to disrupt and rebuild the historical patient and office experience as we evolve with modern medicine in a post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, Urban/standards , Neurosurgery/standards , Neurosurgical Procedures/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Neurosurgery/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , SARS-CoV-2
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