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1.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(1): 2039017, 2022 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730547

ABSTRACT

Assessment of safety of COVID-19 vaccines is an ongoing process. This study aims to explore long-term adverse events reported by physicians and dentists who received at least two COVID-19 vaccine doses. A group of physicians and dentists were invited to complete a validated questionnaire that was composed of items on: socio-demographics, medical history, administered vaccines, and long-term adverse events (LTAE). Data of a total of 498 practitioners were included. Age ranged from 22 to 71 years (mean age= 35.75 ± 11.74) with a female majority (N = 348, 69.9%). The most frequently administered vaccines were Pfizer-BioNtech, Sinopharm and AstraZeneca vaccines. A total of 80 (16.0%) participants reported LTAEs which were mainly fatigue, menstrual disturbances, myalgia, arthralgia, dizziness, and headache (N = 32, 15, 8, 6, 4, and 4, respectively). There was no statistically significant association between LTAEs and: age, gender, or medical history (P > .05). The collective symptoms of fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, dizziness, and headache were significantly associated with Sinopharm vaccine (P = .04). This was further confirmed by general linear multivariate model analysis. Less than 20% of COVID-19 vaccine recipients may complain of LTAEs that are mostly fatigue-related. It seems that factors such as age, gender, and medical status play a negligible role in development of these AEs. On the other hand, Sinopharm vaccine showed the highest significant association with these AEs followed by AstraZeneca vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Adult , Aged , Arthralgia/chemically induced , Arthralgia/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Dentists , Dizziness , Fatigue/chemically induced , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Jordan , Middle Aged , Myalgia/chemically induced , Myalgia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Young Adult
2.
Cranio ; : 1-8, 2022 Jan 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655829

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to highlight jaw-related complications in COVID-19 manifestations, their etiology, and prevention methods. METHODS: A systematic review of literature was conducted. MEDLINE/PubMed, and Google Scholar were searched for the following keywords: "COVID-19" "Oral manifestations", "Musculoskeletal patients", "Mandible", "Jaw", "Osteonecrosis", "MRONJ", and "dry socket". RESULTS: Only nine articles were included in this review. Jaw-related disorders associated with COVID-19 were dry socket, osteonecrosis, and orofacial pain related to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and giant cell arteritis (GCA). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 potentially predisposes to osteonecrosis due to thrombotic inflammatory phenomena caused by the disease itself or its therapeutic modalities. All jaw osteonecrosis cases reported so far in relation to COVID-19 affected the upper jaw. Orofacial pain in COVID-19 patients was related to TMD and GCA. Clinical evidence-based studies are required to investigate the actual prevalence and possible correlation between COVID-19 and jaw-related disorders.

3.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(3)2020 07 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502400

ABSTRACT

Since the first cases of the novel corona virus disease (COVID-19) were diagnosed in China, outcomes associated with this infection in terms of total numbers of cases and deaths have varied widely between countries. While some countries had minimal rates of infections and deaths, other countries were hit hard by the pandemic. Countries with highest numbers of cases continued to change over time, but at the time of submission of this article they are: USA, Brazil, Russia, UK, India, Spain, Italy, Peru and Chile. This is in contrary to many countries in the Middle East, Far East, and Africa, which had lower cases or deaths/cases rates. This raised many questions pertaining to this variation. This overview explores the potential factors that contribute to spread, transmission and outcomes of the COVID-19 infection. It also uses an evidence-based approach in reviewing the available most recent literature that tackled the various factors that modify the populations' response to COVID-19, namely, factors pertaining to population characteristics, environmental and geographic factors.

4.
J Craniofac Surg ; 32(7): e652-e655, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486450

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 manifests mainly as respiratory symptoms. Extrapulmonary manifestations have also been detected and several vital organs may sustain irreversible or long-standing damage. These extrapulmonary manifestations can be detected in cardiovascular, hepatic, renal, and hematologic systems. Maxillofacial surgeons may encounter patients who have recovered from COVID-19 but are still suffering long-term morbidities as a result of this incompletely understood infection. Consequently, they have to be aware of the various systemic complications that may be encountered in these patients as they may interfere with their treatment plan or may necessitate certain modifications and precautions.In this report the authors present the long-standing systemic complications of COVID-19 reported so far, and discuss their implications within the context of maxillofacial surgery with regards to the modifications and precautions in the process of treatment planning.Graphical abstract shows the long-term complications of COVID-19 that may complicate maxillofacial surgical procedures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470872

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Close patient contact is an essential component of clinical dental education, which can expose students and faculty to risk of COVID-19 and its sequelae. METHODS: The study was a cross-sectional survey conducted among faculty and clinical students at an academic dental hospital in Al Madinah western Saudi Arabia. An online questionnaire was distributed to collect data on prevalence, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and long-term health and socioeconomic complications of COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Prevalence of COVID-19 was 19.6% among a total of 316 students and faculty. Participants cited family and friends as the primary source of infection (40.3%). Among cross-infection control practices, they cited failure to practice distancing as the primary reason for infection transmission (61.3%). The disease was symptomatic in 85.5% of infected personnel. Most frequently reported clinical manifestations were: fever, cough, malaise, and diarrhoea (74.1%, 56.5%, 40.3%, 32.3%, respectively). A proportion of 37.1% of infected personnel stated that they had long COVID-19, and 58.3% of infected students reported deteriorated academic achievement. CONCLUSIONS: One in five of clinical dental students and their faculty had COVID-19. Most cases were symptomatic, and a large proportion developed long COVID or adverse socioeconomic consequences. Regardless of the severity of symptoms encountered during the acute stage of COVID-19 infection, all infected dental healthcare personnel should be followed, especially those who report long COVID. Continuous follow-up and assistance for infected students may be warranted to mitigate the potential academic and mental drawbacks caused by the pandemic. Dental schools should adopt clear policies regarding COVID-19 transmission and prevention and should implement them in their infection-control education and training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
6.
Oral Dis ; 28 Suppl 1: 933-934, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388370
8.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(6)2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259632

ABSTRACT

Background Distribution of COVID-19 vaccines has been surrounded by suspicions and rumors making it necessary to provide the public with accurate reports from trustworthy experts such as healthcare professionals. Methods We distributed a questionnaire in Jordan among physicians, dentists and nurses who received a COVID-19 vaccine to explore the side effects (SE) they encountered after the first or the second dose of one of three vaccines namely: AstraZeneca Vaxzevria (AZ), Pfizer-BioNTeck (PB), and SinoPharm (SP) vaccines. Results A total of 409 professionals participated. Approximately 18% and 31% of participants reported no SE after the first dose and second dose, respectively. The remainder had mostly local side effects related to injection site (74%). Systemic side effects in the form of fatigue (52%), myalgia (44%), headache (42%), and fever (35%) prevailed mainly after the first dose. These were significantly associated with AZ vaccine, and age ≤ 45 years (p = 0.000 and 0.01, respectively). No serious SE were reported. Conclusions We can conclude that SE of COVID-19 vaccines distributed in Jordan are within the common range known so far for these vaccines. Further studies are needed to include larger sample size and longer follow-up period to monitor possible serious and long-term SE of the vaccines.

9.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 20(supl.1):e0122-e0122, 2020.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas), Grey literature | ID: grc-742321

ABSTRACT

In November 2002, a virus known as SARS-CoV was identified in Guangdong, China, and it was implicated as the etiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Seventeen years later, in the same month of November, a similar disease with more dramatic outcomes was identified in neighboring Wuhan. It has been six months since the identification of first cases of COVID-19 pandemic;however, unveiling clinical characteristics and modes of transmission of the disease are taking longer than expected. This overview aims to highlight some important points regarding the mode of transmission for which continuously surprising facts are being revealed every day. We also raise some vital questions to alert the scientific community to find the right answers and minimize the drastic fatal outcomes of this disease. It can be stated that SARS-CoV-2 could be transmitted as aerosol infection as well as through contacting infected surfaces. The possible role of abdominal gases as a route of spread of the virus should be considered and a fecal sample might be a useful diagnostic tool. Moreover, medical face masks are not protective from virus transmission during treating COVID-19 patients in settings where aerosol-generating procedures are performed. Doffing of PPE for healthcare workers needs more attention as this might be a source of infection unless additional measures of PPE disinfection are employed before doffing.

10.
J Dent Sci ; 16(3): 806-816, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Several pharmacotherapeutic methods have been used for the treatment of COVID-19 with varying degrees of success. No definitive treatment or vaccine has been officially approved to-date. This review aimed to highlight COVID-19 pharmacotherapeutic agents that are relevant to dental practice in terms of their clinical indications in COVID-19 and dental practice, as well as their adverse effects as they impact the dental patient. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Systematic search was performed using the following keywords combinations: Pharmacotherapy AND COVID-19 OR Pharmacotherapy AND SARS-CoV-2 OR Treatment AND COVID-19. Studies were categorized according to the type of pharmacotherapy used. Pharmacotherapeutic agents were extracted and only those relevant to dental practice were included for review. RESULTS: For analysis, a total of 79 clinical trials research articles were included that included COVID-19 pharmacotherapeutic agents relevant to dental practice. Those were analgesics (paracetamol; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents); antibiotics (azithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole); antivirals (penciclovir); and immunomodulatory agents (hydroxychloroquine, corticosteroids). While some COVID-19 drugs are less relevant to dental practice, as antivirals and hydroxychloroquine, their association with long-term adverse effects requires adequate knowledge among dental practitioners. CONCLUSION: Many of COVID-19 pharmacotherapeutic agents are used to treat oral diseases particularly orofacial pain and inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, some of these drugs may induce adverse effects that complicate dental treatment. Thorough knowledge of COVID-19 therapy and its dental implications is essential for dental practitioners, and is expected to contribute to a better understanding and effective utilization of these therapeutic agents.

11.
Eur J Dent ; 14(S 01): S20-S26, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841676

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to analyze Jordanian dentists' inquiries on oral infections and antimicrobial prescribing using dental professional WhatsApp groups during coronavirus disease lockdown period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three professional WhatsApp groups of Jordanian dentists were reviewed and analyzed for inquiries posted during the period from January to May 2020. Inquiries were sent from patients to their dentists who posted these inquiries to the professional WhatsApp dental groups for consultation and professional advice. All queries regarding oral infections and antimicrobial prescribing were extracted and analyzed. RESULTS: Three WhatsApp professional groups with a total numbers of members of 750 dentists who posted queries about their patients were included in this study. Dentist members posted queries about their patients to these professional WhatsApp groups. There was a total of 32 inquiries regarding oral lesions and 11 consultations regarding prescribing and dental management of medically compromised patients giving a total of 43 consultations. Among which there were 19 inquiries on oral infections and 9 inquiries on antimicrobial prescribing giving a total of 28 consultations. Most common inquiries were on bacterial infections (localized dentoalveolar abscess, pericoronitis, cellulitis, and lymphoid hyperplasia of the tongue), viral herpetic infections, and Candida infections (erythematous and pseudomembranous candidiasis). CONCLUSIONS: Many dental practitioners cannot distinguish the correct diagnostic features of oral infections particularly viral and fungal infections. Continuing education should be considered to focus on clinical manifestations of various oral infections. Further, educational activities that focus on variations in treatment protocols for various infections should be introduced particularly those that concern indications for antimicrobial prescribing.

12.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 20(supl.1): e0122, 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-699461

ABSTRACT

Abstract In November 2002, a virus known as SARS-CoV was identified in Guangdong, China, and it was implicated as the etiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Seventeen years later, in the same month of November, a similar disease with more dramatic outcomes was identified in neighboring Wuhan. It has been six months since the identification of first cases of COVID-19 pandemic; however, unveiling clinical characteristics and modes of transmission of the disease are taking longer than expected. This overview aims to highlight some important points regarding the mode of transmission for which continuously surprising facts are being revealed every day. We also raise some vital questions to alert the scientific community to find the right answers and minimize the drastic fatal outcomes of this disease. It can be stated that SARS-CoV-2 could be transmitted as aerosol infection as well as through contacting infected surfaces. The possible role of abdominal gases as a route of spread of the virus should be considered and a fecal sample might be a useful diagnostic tool. Moreover, medical face masks are not protective from virus transmission during treating COVID-19 patients in settings where aerosol-generating procedures are performed. Doffing of PPE for healthcare workers needs more attention as this might be a source of infection unless additional measures of PPE disinfection are employed before doffing.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , SARS Virus , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Health Services Needs and Demand
13.
Healthcare ; 8(3):216, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-652156

ABSTRACT

Since the first cases of the novel corona virus disease (COVID-19) were diagnosed in China, outcomes associated with this infection in terms of total numbers of cases and deaths have varied widely between countries. While some countries had minimal rates of infections and deaths, other countries were hit hard by the pandemic. Countries with highest numbers of cases continued to change over time, but at the time of submission of this article they are: USA, Brazil, Russia, UK, India, Spain, Italy, Peru and Chile. This is in contrary to many countries in the Middle East, Far East, and Africa, which had lower cases or deaths/cases rates. This raised many questions pertaining to this variation. This overview explores the potential factors that contribute to spread, transmission and outcomes of the COVID-19 infection. It also uses an evidence-based approach in reviewing the available most recent literature that tackled the various factors that modify the populations"response to COVID-19, namely, factors pertaining to population characteristics, environmental and geographic factors.

14.
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