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1.
Journal of Forensic Medicine Science and Law ; JOUR(1):8-12, 31.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2083969

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The present pandemic caused by COVID 19 has affected the world as a whole and social distancing became a part of our lives. Medical education like any other form of education was affected and online classes came to the rescue. Methods: This study was conducted with the rationale to find out how effective are online classes and what measures can be taken to further to simulate online classes as near as possible to physical classes. Google forms were given to undergraduate medical students. 183 students participated in this study. Likert’s scale was used to grade the scores from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Results: The observations revealed that only 2.73% students strongly agreed being comfortable with online classes and 6.55% participants strongly agreed that their internet connectivity was good. 1.64% strongly agreed and that they were able to follow the class and 14.98% strongly disagreed that there were no distracting agent. 16.94% strongly agreed that they are accustomed with the smart devices being used. About 25.13% disagreed that voice quality was good. Majority strongly agreed that recorded videos and hard copies of the class material would be helpful. On being asked if online classes are as good as the physical classes for theoretical knowledge and practical knowledge, most of them disagreed. Conclusion: Online classes is the important resource in hand for continuing medical teaching during pandemics, there is need to take more efforts for making it student-friendly by incorporating audio, video and texts which are interesting for the students. Technological support should be provided by institution and appropriate Faculty training is needed. © 2022, Medicolegal Association of Maharashtra. All rights reserved.

2.
Pediatric Blood & Cancer ; JOUR:S338-S338, 69.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083438
3.
Annals of Library and Information Studies ; 69(3):208-220, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2081660

ABSTRACT

The current study curates a list of authentic and open-access sources of alphanumeric COVID-19 pandemic data. We have gathered 74 datasets from 42 sources, including sources from 18 countries. The datasets are searched through the Kaggle and GitHub repositories besides Google, providing a representation of varieties of pandemic-related datasets. The datasets are categorized according to their sources-primary and secondary, and according to their geographical distribution. While analyzing the dataset, we came across some classes in which the datasets can be categorized. We present the categorization in the form of taxonomy and highlight the present COVID-19 data collection and use challenges. The study will help researchers and data curators in the identification and classification of pandemic data. © 2022, National Institute of Science Communication and Policy Research. All rights reserved.

5.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics ; 114(3):e344-e344, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2036105

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine enthusiasm and uptake in radiation oncology rapidly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, but it is unclear if and how telemedicine should be utilized after the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) ends. Despite ongoing COVID-19 risks and public payer support for telemedicine, several private payers have stopped reimbursing telemedicine weekly see video visits. We performed a large single-institution assessment of provider perspectives on telemedicine after we had achieved a more mature level of adoption to better understand factors considered when determining to use telemedicine and to estimate the percent of visits that could be safely performed with telemedicine. We distributed a survey to all radiation oncology attendings at our large academic institution in October 2021 to assess satisfaction, facilitators, and barriers to telemedicine implementation. We performed quantitative and qualitative analyses to characterize satisfaction and to identify factors influencing whether telemedicine is employed. For the qualitative analysis, two authors independently coded open-ended survey responses and identified categories and themes following established content analysis methodology. We calculated the average proportion of visits that providers expected could be appropriately performed with telemedicine without a clinically significant decline in the quality of care for each disease site and visit type. 60 of 82 eligible radiation oncologists (73%) responded to the survey. 78% of respondents were satisfied with telemedicine in the radiation oncology department, and 83% wished to continue offering video visits after the COVID-19 PHE ends. Common reasons providers endorsed for wanting to integrate telemedicine into practice included: patient and provider preference, increased access to care and clinical trials, allowing for greater relationship with the care team, and improved clinical safety, efficiency, and quality. Patient factors influencing whether physicians offer telemedicine included the patient's travel burden, patient preferences, and whether a physical exam is required. About 20% of new consultations and 50% of weekly management visits were estimated to be clinically appropriate for telemedicine. Central Nervous System/Pediatrics and Thoracic faculty considered telemedicine appropriate for the greatest proportion (50%) of new consultations. 93% of respondents felt comfortable determining whether telemedicine was appropriate. Surveyed radiation oncologists were satisfied with telemedicine in their practice and wished to continue offering video visits in the future. Although provider perceptions of clinical appropriateness of telemedicine varied widely based on disease site and visit type, providers felt comfortable determining when telemedicine would be appropriate for patients. Our data suggest payers should continue to support this patient-centered technology. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics is the property of Pergamon Press - An Imprint of Elsevier Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

6.
Machine Learning and Data Science: Fundamentals and Applications ; : 135-145, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2033873

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus is a pandemic nowadays around the globe. This epidemic started from China and spread to the other countries of the world rapidly. The effect of this deadly disease is causing a huge number of deaths per day around the globe. Initially, it started spreading in the countries where the temperature is relatively low like Europe and North America. India also started witnessing cases in the month of February, which is by and large not that hot a month in the country. This created a belief in India that when the summers are set in the country, the virus would not have any or very little effect, but gradually this belief faded away and the coronavirus surrounded India and affected the regions which are comparatively hotter than other areas. In this paper, we have taken this temperature effect as one criterion for coronavirus and shown the relationship between coronavirus and temperature. Our result of r2 (r-squared), which is a measure of independence, has a value of +0.75 indicating that the factor of temperature has no significance in the rise in the number of Covid cases in India. © 2022 Scrivener Publishing LLC.

7.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(8):LC12-LC17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2006502

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused considerable panic and anguish among the world's population, including India. So, besides physical health, COVID-19 has considerably left its mark on mental health. Aim: To describe the study population according to their clinico-social, demographic profile, the level of anxiety prior to COVID-19 rapid antigen testing, and to explore the determinants of anxiety among COVID-19 suspected patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in June, 2021-August, 2021 with a sample of 197 adult participants attending the fever clinic of Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. The data collection tool used was a predesigned, pretested structured schedule where the level of anxiety was measured with the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) self-administered questionnaire. Relevant frequencies, percentages, central tendencies, and dispersions were calculated. Results: Total of 197 responses were analysed, the mean age of respondents was 44.43 +/- 16.54 years with 58.4% male. Among the patients, 64.5% were vaccinated and around 50.3% of total patients were partially or fully vaccinated by Covishield. Of the 197 respondents included in the study, 11.7% had anxiety (GAD score >= 10) before Rapid Antigen Testing (RAT) and among the participants who tested positive (70 patients), 10 patients (14.3%) had anxiety. Education, occupation, number of the symptoms and the symptoms of sore throat, myalgia and joint pain were significantly associated with the anxiety level. Number of symptoms, joint pain, fatigue, weakness and current fever status was significantly associated with RAT positivity. Conclusion: One out of every 10 patients attending fever clinic with suspected COVID-19 suffered from significant anxiety before the RAT test. These findings mandates linking counselling services with RAT testing facility at the fever clinic.

8.
Journal of the Bahrain Medical Society ; 34(2):25-39, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1998417

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health crisis with a likely long-term psychological impact on healthcare workers (HCWs). As the pandemic moves towards endemic status, little knowledge exists on how it has affected HCWs in the Kingdom of Bahrain. This study aims to evaluate the psychological impact and related factors of HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Factors were assessed at two time periods: 1- July 2020 (T1: 6 months after the pandemic started in Bahrain) and 2- 6-month follow-up during January 2021 (T2: 12 months).

9.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ; 14(3):10247-10254, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939408

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess the perception of stress using the most widely used psychological assessment instrument perceived stress scale (PSS-10) during the lockdown in the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic among the late adolescents in Malaysian population. Materials and methods: Cross sectional study using the google form via WhatsApp among late adolescents in Malaysian population using the snowball sampling technique was used. PSSscoring is 0 = Never, 1 = Almost Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Fairly Often, 4 = Very Often. Scores are obtained by reversing responses to the four positively stated items. Cronbach's alpha was used to measure reliability. Results were analysed by SPSS. Results: Cronbach's alpha value was 0.634, indicates acceptable. Our results showed females have higher scores in the questions related to been upset, unable to control, could not cope and been angered. On the other hand, the males have higher scores compared to felt confident, control irritations. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study found females get higher level of stress symptoms than males to cope up with second wave of pandemic. Therefore, it is suggested to support with psychotherapy techniques during the management of COVID-19 pandemic.

10.
International Conference on Network Security and Blockchain Technology, ICNSBT 2021 ; 481 LNNS:369-378, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1919748

ABSTRACT

With the increase of COVID-19 instances worldwide, a reliable method for diagnosing COVID-19 cases is needed. The major issue in detecting COVID-19 clients is a lack of diagnostic techniques that are both reliable and affordable. Due to the virus’s rapid dissemination, medical professionals are having difficulties finding positive cases. The second real-life issue is sharing data across clinics worldwide but keeping in mind the organizations’ privacy concerns. Developing a collaborative approach and protecting personal information are two important issues while creating a global classifier. This article offers a system that uses Ethereum - based federated learning to gather a modest quantity of data from many sources and train a global deep learning model. The data is authenticated using blockchain technology, and federated learning trained the system worldwide while maintaining the institution’s anonymity. The suggested structure may make use of current data to enhance diseases recognition. Our findings show that our method is more effective in detecting COVID-19 participants. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

11.
Benchmarking-an International Journal ; : 28, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1853324

ABSTRACT

Purpose With the emergence of COVID-19 and increased infections, organizations urged their employees to work from home. Furthermore, with the on-going pandemic, employees take measures to ensure individual safety and their families. Hence, work from home culture can result in long-term employee satisfaction. However, no study addresses the development of work from the home culture in an integrated framework. Therefore, the current research explores the role of safety during the pandemic, organizational commitment and employee motivation on work from home culture, which may influence employee satisfaction. Furthermore, job demands and home demands were also evaluated for employee satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach The study used existing scales of the factors to develop the measures and collect perceptual responses from employees working from home, supported with a pre-test. The study executed a survey with effective responses from 132 individuals spread across different sectors to validate the hypotheses. The responses were analysed using partial least squares in ADANCO 2.2. Findings Findings suggest safety concerns along with organization commitment enhances work from home culture. Such work from home culture enhances employee motivation and employee satisfaction. Furthermore, job demands and home demands also influence employee satisfaction. Originality/value To the best of the authors knowledge, the study is the foremost to develop an integrated empirical framework for work from home culture and its antecedents and consequences. The study has several important implications for managers.

12.
12th International Conference on Computer Communication and Informatics, ICCCI 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1831789

ABSTRACT

The days when one used to engage with a service through keyboards are gone. Users nowadays interact with systems through Chatbots or voice assistants. They are most likely to benefit humans by providing intelligent and suitable answers. Chatbot's aim is to make a productive conversation between human and machine. Every time the chatbot receives user input, it saves the input and response, which aids Chatbots with some initial knowledge. The utilization of Chatbots for health has certainly been fruitful from aiding doctors with their schedules to helping the public with answering their tiny queries. We know how the global pandemic caused by corona virus has adversely affected everyone's lives. People need to be informed about various aspects. The goal of this particular paper is to discuss the implementation and model of a telegram based Chatbot system with respect to helping people with the facts, precautions, preventive measures, and various other aspects related to the corona virus. It also throws light on protecting one's mental health. © 2022 IEEE.

13.
International Management Conference, IMC 2021 ; : 229-236, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1826317

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has put a major impact on the children in conflict with law. This paper aims to capture the major key issues and the necessary steps taken by the state government to mitigate the negative consequences for children in conflict with law. It is found from various studies that during the beginning period of COVID-19, reduction in the rate of crime is observed, and the reason for this is due to drastic change in the routine activities of the individuals and with the closure of schools, colleges and other services. The pandemic effect of staying at home and social distancing led to decline in crime rate by the juveniles. The most concerning part was the staffing crisis seen at observation and special homes in the state of Odisha. The social factors such as parental supervision, love, care and affection play vital role against delinquent behaviour of children. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

14.
PubMed; 2020.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-333620

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This meta-analysis sought to determine the estimated association between obesity and adverse outcomes among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We followed the recommended PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect for published literature between December 1, 2019, and October 2, 2020. The data for the study were pooled from studies that contained the search terms "Obesity" AND (COVID-19 or 2019-nCoV or Coronavirus or SARS-CoV-2) AND ("ICU admission" OR "Hospitalization" OR "Disease severity" OR "Invasive mechanical ventilator" OR "Death" OR "Mortality"). All the online searches were supplemented by reference screening of retrieved studies for additional literature. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) from the retrieved studies were calculated using the random effect model (Inverse-Variance method). FINDINGS: Five studies with a combined sample size of 335,192 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled OR from the final analysis showed that patients who are severely obese were more likely to experience adverse outcome (death or ICU admission or needing IMV or hospitalization) compared to the normal patients [OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 2.33 - 3.40, I 2 = 29%]. CONCLUSION: Severe obesity is a risk factor in developing adverse outcomes among COVID-19 patients. The finding of the study signifies promotive, preventive, and curative attention to be accorded patients diagnosed with severe obesity and COVID-19.

15.
Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research ; 13(1):236-241, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1791337

ABSTRACT

After the COVID 19 pandemic, wide varieties of clinical manifestations were identified globally. In addition to major pulmonary manifestations SARS-COV2 virus also causes neurological symptoms particularly anosmia and dysgeusia. In this review article we describe an unusual manifestation of COVID-19 in the form of erectile dysfunction. Apparently healthy young man with COVID 19 presented with erectile dysfunction and asymptomatic hypoxemia. Early diagnosis and treatment of happy hypoxemia and erectile dysfunction in COVID19 patients is deemed necessary for better management and outcome.

18.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S187-S188, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746731

ABSTRACT

Background. Antimicrobials are empirically used in COVID-19 patients resulting in inappropriate stewardship and increased antimicrobial resistance. Our objective was to assess antimicrobial use among suspected COVID-19 in-patients while waiting for the COVID-19 test report. Methods. From March to August 2020, we collected data from in-patients of 12 tertiary-level hospitals across Bangladesh. We identified suspected COVID-19 patients;collected information on antimicrobial received within 24 h before and on hospitalization;and tested nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 using rRT-PCR. We used descriptive statistics and a regression model for data analysis. Results. Among 1188 suspected COVID-19 patients, the median age was 34 years (IQR:2-56), 69% were male, 40% had comorbidities, 53% required oxygen, and 1% required ICU or ventilation support after admission. Antibiotics were used in 92% of patients, 47% within 24 h before, and 89% on admission. Patients also received antiviral, mostly favipiravir (1%) and antiparasitic drugs particularly ivermectin (3%). Third-generation cephalosporin use was the highest (708;60%), followed by macrolide (481;40%), and the majority (853;78%) who took antibiotics were SARS-CoV-2 negative. On admission, 77% mild and 94% moderately ill patients received antibiotics. Before admission, 3% patients had two antibiotics, and on admission, 27% received two to four classes of antibiotics at the same time. According to WHO AWaRe classification, the Watch group antibiotics were mostly used before (43%) as well as on admission (80%). Reserve group antibiotic particularly linezolid was used in 1% patients includes mild cases on admission. Antibiotic use on admission was higher among severely ill patients (AOR = 11.7;95%CI:4.5-30.1) and those who received antibiotics within 24 h before hospital admission (AOR = 1.6;95%CI:1.0-2.5). Antimicrobials used among suspected COVID-19 patients and SARS-CoV-2 positive and negative patients 24 h before and on hospital admission at 12 selected hospitals in Bangladesh, March-August 2020 Antimicrobials used on admission among suspected COVID-19 patients according to disease severity at 12 selected hospitals in Bangladesh, March-August 2020 Conclusion. Antimicrobial use was highly prevalent among suspected COVID-19 in-patients in Bangladesh. Initiating treatment with Watch group antibiotics like third-generation cephalosporin and azithromycin among mild to moderately ill patients were common. Promoting antimicrobial stewardship with monitoring is essential to prevent blanket antibiotic use, thereby mitigating antimicrobial resistance.

19.
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis ; 26(3): 285-287, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707991
20.
European Respiratory Journal ; 58:4, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1705249
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