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3.
Pediatr Radiol ; 51(11): 2083-2092, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Missed appointments can have an adverse impact on health outcomes by delaying appropriate imaging, which can be critical in influencing treatment decisions. OBJECTIVE: To assess for socioeconomic and imaging exam factors associated with missed appointments among children scheduled for diagnostic imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed children (<18 years) scheduled for outpatient diagnostic imaging during a 12-month period. In doing so, we obtained socioeconomic and radiology exam characteristics (modality, intravenous contrast administration, radiation and use of sedation) data from the electronic medical record. We employed multivariate logistic regression to assess the association of socioeconomic, demographic and imaging exam characteristics with imaging missed appointments. RESULTS: In total, 7,275 children met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 8.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.2 years) and the study population consisted of 52% female gender, 69% White race, 38% adolescent age group and 32% with a median household income by ZIP-code category of <$50,000. Logistic regression showed increased likelihood of missed appointments among children of Black/African-American race (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-2.5); with insurance categories including Medicaid (OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.6-2.4), self-pay (OR=2.1; 95% CI=1.3-3.6) and other (OR=2.7; 95% CI=1.3-5.4); with <$50,000 median household income by ZIP-code category (OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.4-2.0); and with examination wait time of 7-21 days (OR=2.7; 95% CI=2.1-3.5) and >21 days (OR=3.7; 95% CI=2.9-4.8). The use of radiation, intravenous contrast agent or sedation was not associated with increased likelihood of missed appointments. CONCLUSION: Expanding our knowledge of how different socioeconomic and imaging-related factors influence missed appointments among children can serve as a foundational step to better understand existing and emerging disparities and inform strategies to advance health equity efforts in radiology.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , Radiology , Adolescent , Child , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Socioeconomic Factors , United States
4.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(5): 663-668, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213302

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To implement a multifaceted wellness program in an academic radiology department to prevent burnout and to assess initial outcomes with special focus on the challenges related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A wellness program was established to address institutional and personal factors of burnout. The program focused on interventions to improve efficiency of practice, provide personal and career support, and create a culture of wellness. The components of the program were designed with input from radiology faculty, and the program was financially supported by the hospital's physician organization. A survey was performed 6 months after the initiation of the program to determine radiologist engagement and satisfaction. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new survey was administered to identify needs of faculty and adjust initiatives. This study was exempt from institutional review board approval. RESULTS: The majority of radiologists (79%) agreed or strongly agreed that the wellness program provided opportunities to connect with coworkers. All radiologists agreed that the program was helpful and should be continued. During the COVID-19 pandemic, 49% of physicians requested initiatives focused on well-being, emotional health, and mindfulness to support them during the crisis. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of a faculty wellness program in an academic radiology department addressed institutional and personal factors of burnout, allowed faculty to connect with coworkers, and was found to be helpful by all radiologists. The COVID-19 pandemic shifted needs to well-being and emotional health initiatives. Follow-up data are necessary to assess its effect on burnout reduction.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Radiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Health Promotion , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(7): 1027-1037, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207037

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 and the publicly documented deaths of countless Black individuals have highlighted the need to confront systemic racism, address racial/ethnic disparities, and improve diversity and inclusion in radiology. Several radiology departments have begun to create diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) committees to systematically address DEI issues in radiology. However, there are few articles that provide departments with guidance on how to create DEI committees to comprehensively address DEI issues in radiology. The purpose of this review is to provide readers with a framework and practical tips for creating a comprehensive, institutionally aligned radiology DEI committee. METHODS: The authors describe key components of the strategic planning process and lessons learned in the creation of a radiology DEI committee, on the basis of the experience of an integrated, academic northeastern radiology department. RESULTS: A hospital-based strategic planning process defining the DEI vision, mission, goals, and strategies was used to inform the formation of the radiology department DEI committee. The radiology department performed gap analyses by conducting internal and external research. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analyses were performed on the basis of consultations with institutional and other departmental DEI leaders as well as DEI leaders from other academic medical centers. This framework served as the basis for the creation of the radiology departmental DEI committee, including a steering committee and four task forces (education, research, patient experience, and workforce development), each charged with addressing specific institutional goals and strategies. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides academic radiology departments with a blueprint to create a comprehensive, institutionally aligned radiology DEI committee.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology , Academic Medical Centers , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(7): 1000-1008, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091800

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Disproportionally high rates of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been noted among communities with limited English proficiency, resulting in an unmet need for improved multilingual care and interpreter services. To enhance multilingual care, the authors created a freely available web application, RadTranslate, that provides multilingual radiology examination instructions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of this intervention in radiology. METHODS: The device-agnostic web application leverages artificial intelligence text-to-speech technology to provide standardized, human-like spoken examination instructions in the patient's preferred language. Standardized phrases were collected from a consensus group consisting of technologists, radiologists, and ancillary staff members. RadTranslate was piloted in Spanish for chest radiography performed at a COVID-19 triage outpatient center that served a predominantly Spanish-speaking Latino community. Implementation included a tablet displaying the application in the chest radiography room. Imaging appointment duration was measured and compared between pre- and postimplementation groups. RESULTS: In the 63-day test period after launch, there were 1,267 application uses, with technologists voluntarily switching exclusively to RadTranslate for Spanish-speaking patients. The most used phrases were a general explanation of the examination (30% of total), followed by instructions to disrobe and remove any jewelry (12%). There was no significant difference in imaging appointment duration (11 ± 7 and 12 ± 3 min for standard of care versus RadTranslate, respectively), but variability was significantly lower when RadTranslate was used (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Artificial intelligence-aided multilingual audio instructions were successfully integrated into imaging workflows, reducing strain on medical interpreters and variance in throughput and resulting in more reliable average examination length.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Limited English Proficiency , Artificial Intelligence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 50(3): 284-287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015060

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the capacity of interventional radiology departments worldwide to effectively treat COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients while preventing disease transmission among patients and healthcare workers. In this review, we describe the various data driven infection control measures implemented by the interventional radiology department of a large tertiary care center in the United States including the use and novel re-use of personal protective equipment, COVID-19 testing strategies, modifications in procedural workflows and the leveraging of telehealth visits. Herein, we provide effective triage, procedural, and management algorithms that may guide other interventional radiology departments during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and in future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Radiology Department, Hospital , Radiology, Interventional/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , United States
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