Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 32
Filter
2.
Int J Gen Med ; 14: 5111-5117, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817643

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) could be a predictive factor of severe COVID-19. However, most relevant studies are retrospective, and the optimal NLR cut-off point has not been determined. The objective of our research was identification and validation of the best NLR cut-off value on admission that could predict high in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Medical files of all patients admitted for COVID-19 pneumonia in our dedicated COVID-units between March and April 2020 (derivation cohort) and between October and December 2020 (validation cohort) were reviewed. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-nine patients were included in the study (198 in the derivation and 101 in the validation cohort, respectively). Youden's J statistic in the derivation cohort determined the optimal cut-off value for the performance of NLR at admission to predict mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The NLR cut-off value of 5.94 had a sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 64%. In ROC curve analysis, the AUC was 0.665 [95% CI 0.530-0.801, p= 0.025]. In the validation cohort, the best predictive cut-off value of NLR was 6.4, which corresponded to a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 64% with AUC 0.766 [95% CI 0.651-0.881, p <0.001]. When the NLR cut-off value of 5.94 was applied in the validation cohort, there was no significant difference in death and survival in comparison with the derivation NLR cut-off. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) analysis showed no significant classification change in outcome between both NLR cut-off values (NRI:0.012, p=0.31). CONCLUSION: In prospective analysis, an NLR value of 5.94 predicted high in-hospital mortality upon admission in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia.

3.
Kidney Medicine ; : 100470, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1805342

ABSTRACT

Rationale & Objective Neutralizing monoclonal antibody treatments have shown promising preliminary results in kidney transplant recipients infected with SARS-CoV-2. However, their efficacy in kidney transplant recipients infected with Omicron variant has not been reported yet. Study Design Single-center retrospective study. Setting & Participants We included all consecutive kidney transplant recipients treated with monoclonal antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 infection (positive polymerase chain reaction on nasopharyngeal swab) between June 10th 2021 and January 14th 2022. Forty-seven kidney transplant recipients were included. All patients had symptoms evolving for ≤ 7 days and no oxygen therapy need at monoclonal antibody infusion. Results Symptoms at diagnosis were mainly cough (n=25 [53%]) and fever (n=15 [32%]). Eighty-three percent of the cohort (n=39) had been vaccinated with at least 2 doses before infection, of whom 77% (n=30) had demonstrated a vaccine-induced humoral response. They were treated with either casirivimab-imdevimab (n= 16 [34%]) or sotrovimab (n= 31 [66%]) a median of 2 (ranges 0-6) days after the onset of symptoms. Except for one mild allergic reaction during casirivimab-imdevimab infusion, no side effects were reported. Median viral loads at admission (day 0) and 7 days after mAb infusion were 2,110,027 (ranges 1000-153,798,962) copies/mL and 1,000 (ranges 0-10,000,000) copies/mL, respectively. Genotypes were available for 22 kidney transplant recipients (47%). Omicron, Delta, and Gamma variants were identified in 13 (59%), 8 (36%), 1 (5%) patients, respectively. In kidney transplant recipients infected with Omicron variant, the median viral loads at day 0 and day 7 were 752,789 (ranges 4000-12,859,300) copies/mL and 1,353 (ranges 0-1,211,163) copies/mL, respectively. Two kidney transplant recipients required hospitalization immediately after sotrovimab perfusion for oxygen therapy that was weaned in 3 days allowing patients’ discharge. None were admitted to the intensive care unit or died. Limitations Small sample-size, no control group. Conclusions Neutralizing monoclonal antibody therapy is associated with positive outcomes in kidney transplant recipients with mild COVID-19, including those infected with the Omicron variant.

4.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1481-1487, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718392

ABSTRACT

In-center maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients are at high risk of acquiring coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by cross-contamination inside the unit. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission during the very first pandemic phase (March-July 2020) in a cohort of in-center maintenance HD patients and in nurses the same HD facility, using a phylogenetic approach. All SARS-CoV-2 quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction positive patients and nurses from our HD unit-respectively 10 out of 98, and 8 out of 58- and two other positive patients dialyzed in our self-care unit were included. Whole-genome viral sequencing and phylogenetic analysis supported the cluster investigation. Five positive patients were usually dialyzed in the same room and same shift before their COVID-19 diagnosis was made. Viral sequencing performed on 4/5 patients' swabs showed no phylogenetic link between their viruses. The fifth patient (whose virus could not be sequenced) was dialyzed at the end of the dialysis room and was treated by a different nurse than the one in charge of the other patients. Three nurses shared the same virus detected in both self-care patients (one of them had been transferred to our in-center facility). The epidemiologically strongly suspected intra-unit cluster could be ruled out by viral genome sequencing. The infection control policy did not allow inter-patient contamination within the HD facility, in contrast to evidence of moderate dissemination within the nursing staff and in the satellite unit. Epidemiologic data without phylogenetic confirmation might mislead the interpretation of the dynamics of viral spreading within congregate settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Infection Control/methods , Renal Dialysis , Aged , Belgium , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
5.
Transplant Direct ; 8(3): e1292, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707294

ABSTRACT

Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may have an increased risk of mortality compared with the general population and hemodialysis patients. As these patients are immunosuppressed, it might seem obvious to attribute this excess mortality to the impaired immunity induced by immunosuppression. In line with this reasoning is the low immune response, both cellular and humoral, that KTRs mount in response to the anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine; however, acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with coronavirus disease 2019 is triggered by a state of inflammation and cytokine release syndrome that lead to pulmonary damage and increased mortality. In that context, immunosuppressive treatment dampening the immune response could, in theory, be potentially beneficial. This review aims at analyzing the current knowledge on the impact of immunosuppressive treatment on mortality in SARS-CoV-2-infected KTRs, the optimal management of immunosuppression in the coronavirus disease 2019 era, and the vaccine response and management in immunosuppressed KTRs.

6.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(5): 1226-1232, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1681684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Treating hypoxemia while meeting the soaring demands of oxygen can be a challenge during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of the surgical facemask and the double-trunk mask on top of the low-flow oxygen nasal cannula on arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) in hypoxemic COVID-19 patients. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: Hospitalized adults with COVID-19 and hypoxemia treated with the low-flow nasal cannula were enrolled between November 13, 2020, and March 05, 2021. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive either the nasal cannula alone (control) or the nasal cannula covered by the surgical facemask or the double-trunk mask. Arterial blood gases were collected at baseline and 30 min after the use of each system. The oxygen output was adapted afterwards to retrieve the baseline pulse oxygen saturation. The final oxygen output value was recorded after another 30-min period. MAIN MEASURES: The primary outcome was the absolute change in PaO2. Secondary outcomes included changes in oxygen output, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), vital parameters, and breathlessness. KEY RESULTS: Arterial blood samples were successfully collected in 24/27 (8 per group) randomized patients. Compared to the nasal cannula alone, PaO2 increased with the surgical facemask (mean change: 20 mmHg, 95% CI: 0.7-38.8; P = .04) and with the double-trunk mask (mean change: 40 mmHg; 95% CI: 21-59; P < .001). Oxygen output was reduced when adding the surgical facemask (median reduction: 1.5 L/min [95% CI: 0.5-4.5], P < .001) or the double-trunk mask (median reduction: 3.3 L/min [95% CI: 2-5], P < .001). The double-trunk mask was associated with a PaCO2 increase of 2.4 mmHg ([95% CI: 0-4.7], P = .049). Neither mask influenced vital parameters or breathlessness. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of the surgical facemask or the double-trunk mask above the nasal cannula improves arterial oxygenation and reduces oxygen consumption.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Cannula , Humans , Masks , Oxygen , Pandemics
7.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1481-1487, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527446

ABSTRACT

In-center maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients are at high risk of acquiring coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by cross-contamination inside the unit. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission during the very first pandemic phase (March-July 2020) in a cohort of in-center maintenance HD patients and in nurses the same HD facility, using a phylogenetic approach. All SARS-CoV-2 quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction positive patients and nurses from our HD unit-respectively 10 out of 98, and 8 out of 58- and two other positive patients dialyzed in our self-care unit were included. Whole-genome viral sequencing and phylogenetic analysis supported the cluster investigation. Five positive patients were usually dialyzed in the same room and same shift before their COVID-19 diagnosis was made. Viral sequencing performed on 4/5 patients' swabs showed no phylogenetic link between their viruses. The fifth patient (whose virus could not be sequenced) was dialyzed at the end of the dialysis room and was treated by a different nurse than the one in charge of the other patients. Three nurses shared the same virus detected in both self-care patients (one of them had been transferred to our in-center facility). The epidemiologically strongly suspected intra-unit cluster could be ruled out by viral genome sequencing. The infection control policy did not allow inter-patient contamination within the HD facility, in contrast to evidence of moderate dissemination within the nursing staff and in the satellite unit. Epidemiologic data without phylogenetic confirmation might mislead the interpretation of the dynamics of viral spreading within congregate settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Infection Control/methods , Renal Dialysis , Aged , Belgium , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5416-5424, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363679

ABSTRACT

The kinetics of IgG antibodies after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain poorly understood. We investigated factors influencing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) IgG antibody levels and time to seronegativation during the follow-up of severe and critically ill patients. We retrospectively reviewed serological evaluations drawn during the follow-up of severe or critical laboratory-proven COVID-19 patients hospitalized at a large academic hospital. Specific IgG titers were measured using a chemiluminescent assay targeting anti-spike and anti-nucleocapsid protein IgG. The influence of time, demographic factors, clinical and paraclinical characteristics, and COVID-19 therapeutics on IgG levels were assessed through linear regression using a mixed-effect model, and delay until IgG negativation through a Weibull regression model. The cohort included 116 patients with a total of 154 IgG measurements drawn at a median of 79 days after diagnosis. IgG antibodies were increased with age (p = 0.005) and decreased significantly over time (p = 0.0002). Using elapsed time and age as covariates, we demonstrated higher IgG levels in patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.0026) and lower IgG levels in immunocompromised patients (p = 0.032). A high BMI was further found to delay and immunodeficiency to hasten significantly seronegativation, whereas no significant effect was observed with corticosteroids. These data highlight the waning over time of IgG antibodies after severe or critical COVID-19. Age, BMI, and immunosuppression also appear to influence the IgG kinetics, while short-term corticotherapy does not. Those data improve the understanding of SARS-CoV-2 serology while further research should determine the determinants of long-term seroprotection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Convalescence , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
18.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 212, 2021 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is highly variable between individuals, ranging from asymptomatic infection to critical disease with acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring mechanical ventilation. Such variability stresses the need for novel biomarkers associated with disease outcome. As SARS-CoV-2 infection causes a kidney proximal tubule dysfunction with urinary loss of uric acid, we hypothesized that low serum levels of uric acid (hypouricemia) may be associated with severity and outcome of COVID-19. METHODS: In a retrospective study using two independent cohorts, we investigated and validated the prevalence, kinetics and clinical correlates of hypouricemia among patients hospitalized with COVID-19 to a large academic hospital in Brussels, Belgium. Survival analyses using Cox regression and a competing risk approach assessed the time to mechanical ventilation and/or death. Confocal microscopy assessed the expression of urate transporter URAT1 in kidney proximal tubule cells from patients who died from COVID-19. RESULTS: The discovery and validation cohorts included 192 and 325 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, respectively. Out of the 517 patients, 274 (53%) had severe and 92 (18%) critical COVID-19. In both cohorts, the prevalence of hypouricemia increased from 6% upon admission to 20% within the first days of hospitalization for COVID-19, contrasting with a very rare occurrence (< 1%) before hospitalization for COVID-19. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 148 days (50-168), 61 (12%) patients required mechanical ventilation and 93 (18%) died. In both cohorts considered separately and in pooled analyses, low serum levels of uric acid were strongly associated with disease severity (linear trend, P < 0.001) and with progression to death and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in Cox (adjusted hazard ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 3.6-7.8, P < 0.001) or competing risks (adjusted hazard ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval 10.4-41.4, P < 0.001) models. At the structural level, kidneys from patients with COVID-19 showed a major reduction in urate transporter URAT1 expression in the brush border of proximal tubules. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalization, low serum levels of uric acid are common and associate with disease severity and with progression to respiratory failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Uric Acid/blood , Aged , Belgium , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organic Anion Transporters/metabolism , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Retrospective Studies
19.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 100(4): 115414, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252664

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence among health care workers (HCWs) and to assess self-reported risk factors for seropositivity. A total of 3255 HCWs were included and the overall seroprevalence was 7.8%. The likelihood of seropositivity was higher in participants reporting any COVID-19 symptoms within the last 4 months (OR 8.32, 95% CI 5.83-11.88, P < 0.001). Being a female HCW (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.11-2.32, P < 0.01), having a cohabitant who was infected with SARS-CoV-2 (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.78-3.66 P < 0.001) or a cohabitant who was a nursing home caregiver (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.59-8.65, P = 0.002) were independently associated with an increased risk of seropositivity. Working in a COVID-19 unit (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.21-2.23, P < 0.001) and being exposed to a SARS-CoV-2 infected co-worker (OR 1.30,95% CI 0.97-1.74, P = 0.016) resulted in higher seropositivity rate. Even if in-hospital exposure may play a significant role, increased infection risk is most likely attributable to household contact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Occupational Exposure , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL